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Old 06-04-2014, 07:33 AM   #1
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Mountain Towing- What To Watch For ?

My 2010 Dodge 1500,4.7 V8, 3.55 Gears and a 6500# Dodge rated towing cap. and towing a 25 ft TT rated at 4400# DW. I have yet to have it in the hills/moutains and looking to venture into some of the northern Georgia mountain areas. What should i be watching for if i'm getting into trouble, as far as handling the steeps ???
Thanks Jim
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Old 06-04-2014, 07:56 AM   #2
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Coolant temps (I have an Ultraguage which tells me the real numbers), and trailer brakes, Going is optional stopping is not. Temps van tell you it is time to down shift and or turn off the AC. I use a 60/40 mix for a higher boil point.
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Old 06-04-2014, 08:32 AM   #3
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My thoughts are: never let the speed get so high when going downhill, that you couldn't stop everything with just the truck brakes. Uphill is seldom a problem, unless you are blocking traffic; use the shift lever to put the trans in a lower gear if the rig is tending to gain speed faster than you like. Gas engines have a lot of engine braking, so it will just be a situation where you need to get used to how it goes downhill. And there is nothing wrong with applying the trailer brakes manually to slow things down.
And remember traffic courtesy--if you have more than 4-5 vehicles back up behind you, you are hindering traffic flow--find a pullout and let them by.
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Old 06-04-2014, 08:48 AM   #4
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Never ever ride the brakes down hill. They will quickly heat up the to point of being useless. Use short stiff brakeing to bring the rig down below the speed you want to travel. Then let off and allow the momentum to bring the speed back up to where you do it again. This allows the brakes to cool between brakeing. Your basically going fast, slow, fast, slow, repeat as necessary.
Use lower gears to let the engine do some, if not most, of the braking. Just pay attention to your RPMs.
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Old 06-04-2014, 08:53 AM   #5
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Never ever ride the brakes down hill. They will quickly heat up the to point of being useless. Use short stiff brakeing to bring the rig down below the speed you want to travel. Then let off and allow the momentum to bring the speed back up to where you do it again. This allows the brakes to cool between brakeing. Your basically going fast, slow, fast, slow, repeat as necessary.
Use lower gears to let the engine do some, if not most, of the braking. Just pay attention to your RPMs.
Very well said !!!! Take your time going down hill !!!!
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Old 06-05-2014, 07:14 PM   #6
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I tow in north Georgia often and the major mountain highways are not too bad regarding grades. The secondary roads are a "dukes" mixture. As said be very aware that you have a lot of weight behind you when descending a grade. The roads are curvy anyway but whatever the speed limit, stay well below it. What parts of N Ga are you planning to visit?
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Old 06-06-2014, 08:30 AM   #7
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I never worry about the traffic behind.
Just concentrate on my driving requirements as its most important to do it safely.
I hardly use the brakes with my diesels and gas engines have even more braking power. I always use engine braking and keep brakes for additional and emergency braking.
When there is a chance I will pull over.
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Old 06-06-2014, 09:09 AM   #8
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Also transmission temperature. Ultragauge or scangauge should provide this. Not much more cost than a simple transmission temperature gauge, and it provides much more information.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shadowcatche View Post
Coolant temps (I have an Ultraguage which tells me the real numbers), and trailer brakes, Going is optional stopping is not. Temps van tell you it is time to down shift and or turn off the AC. I use a 60/40 mix for a higher boil point.
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Old 06-06-2014, 11:12 AM   #9
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My thoughts are: never let the speed get so high when going downhill, that you couldn't stop everything with just the truck brakes. Uphill is seldom a problem, unless you are blocking traffic; use the shift lever to put the trans in a lower gear if the rig is tending to gain speed faster than you like. Gas engines have a lot of engine braking, so it will just be a situation where you need to get used to how it goes downhill. And there is nothing wrong with applying the trailer brakes manually to slow things down.
And remember traffic courtesy--if you have more than 4-5 vehicles back up behind you, you are hindering traffic flow--find a pullout and let them by.
Joe
I agree,. I do the same. See sig.
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Old 06-07-2014, 03:45 PM   #10
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Always mix the coolant with distilled water, especially at drain and refill time.
Look down the road and across to the next turns if possible. Be aware of TT cheeting on the turns. Lock out the OD if possible. Glance back at the TT tires on turns looking for smoke. Keep headlights on. Everytime you stop and get out do a walk around and lay hands on tires, not brakes. Make sure the fridge is really closed. I use tow-haul mode with exhaust brake on full.
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