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Old 11-07-2018, 03:21 PM   #15
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If you buy a RAM diesel with the 6.7L engine it will come with an exhaust brake standard and it will be very effective at retarding speed. If you buy an older 5.9L RAM there will be no engine braking and you will have to rely on the trailer and truck's service brakes. I have the latter and a PacBrake was my first add. Don't think I would want to tow a fiver without one.
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Old 11-07-2018, 04:21 PM   #16
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If you do go with a gasser, you may want to check into a fifth wheel with disc brakes. I tow a 17,000 GVW fifth with a 08 Dodge 3500 diesel, (and yes, I know I'm overloaded). For the first two years, I had the standard drum brakes. The braking was marginal, even after being replaced and adjusted for the famous, "Lippert greasy brake fiasco." With the disc brakes, it will brake very well, even if I don't use the exhaust brake.

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I agree! Drum brakes only self-adjust when in reverse, something you seldom do with a trailer. Disc brakes are always adjusted and much better, that's why most every vehicle has changed to disc from drum brakes. Whether you go diesel/exhaust brake or not, I'd look for disc brakes on the trailer. The newer Ford trucks have a transmission Tow/Haul mode that does make use of engine compression to reduce speed. I wouldn't be afraid to tow a trailer with disc brakes and the Tow/Haul mode.
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Old 11-07-2018, 08:57 PM   #17
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I bought a 2 month new used '96 3500 DRW 5.9 Cummins with a 5 speed manual tranny I put in service pulling all sizes of non rv trailers. Made on trip out and a reload back to the yard and has a B-D exhaust brake installed. Huge difference.

Bought a new '01 2500 Dodge/Cummins with the 47RE auto tranny some said would never need a exhaust brake. First trip was to the hills in TN/MO/AR pulling a 11k 5er....wow no engine braking ....2800-3200 rpms did nothing. I had another B-D installed before the next trip.

Next was a new '03 Dodge/Cummins NV5600 tranny which was the first year model for a all new truck from the tires up to the roof. Jeez...going down a hill was like shifting to neutral. No engine braking at any rpm. Exhaust brake mfg were late getting the 4" exhaust brake out for the new Cummins HO engine . I got a Jacobs through Dodge dealers buisnesslink program for 299 bucks. Love the exhaust brake with the 6 speed manual tranny. It works in every gear even reverse plus winter time fast idle for quick warm ups.
Makes coming down passes like Monarch/Wolf Creek a one or two braking events. No hot brakes.
My Jacobs has been flawless. It comes with a inline mechanical vacuum pump which requires a very long serpentine belt .

If I was going to go with a exhaust brake on the 5.9 Cummins it would be a PRXB Pacbrake as it come with a remote air pump which operates the brake and can be used to pump up tires or toyz.
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Old 11-08-2018, 07:48 AM   #18
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My input - 40' 5th wheel and Ram 2500 6.4 do not go together at all.

A 40' 5th wheel goes with a Ram 3500 Dually diesel.

Now, a lot of redesigned trucks will he out as 2020 models in 8 - 12 months. Rumor has it that both Ford and Ram are will have new gasoline engines in the 7 liter range.

Rumored new redesigned trucks for 2020.

Ram 2500 / 3500
Chevy 2500 / 3500
Ford 150/250/350/450

Typically a redesign means more capability.
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Old 11-08-2018, 02:37 PM   #19
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A pound of torque is a pound of torque whether generated by gasoline or diesel. You're difference is that a truck powered by a diesel is turning out +-200% more torque than the gasoline powered truck at half the RPM. Diesel contains more energy per unt of weight and packs more punch than gasoline so less diesel is required in to do the same amount of work .

Maybe I been lucky, I haven't experienced inordinate maintenance cost with my LBZ Duramax. (but I haven't replaced the injectors either )

My observation is if gasoline engines are equal or better than diesel engines in terms of capability, maintenance and operating costs, big rigs would be running gasoline engines.
I use my 1500 Z-71 for "daily" driving and my diesel for towing. Its worked well for me.
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Old 11-08-2018, 03:26 PM   #20
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I agree! Drum brakes only self-adjust when in reverse, something you seldom do with a trailer. Disc brakes are always adjusted and much better, that's why most every vehicle has changed to disc from drum brakes. Whether you go diesel/exhaust brake or not, I'd look for disc brakes on the trailer. The newer Ford trucks have a transmission Tow/Haul mode that does make use of engine compression to reduce speed. I wouldn't be afraid to tow a trailer with disc brakes and the Tow/Haul mode.
Are regular electric trailer brakes even self adjusting?
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Old 11-08-2018, 04:05 PM   #21
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Are regular electric trailer brakes even self adjusting?
At least some are, A quick search shows 'self-adjusting electric trailer brakes' by many manufacturers. As far as I can tell, they only adjust when backing up, just like automotive and truck self-adjusting brakes. If you don't back up and firmly apply them, I'd suspect after hard stops or descending a mountain would have them out of adjustment. That's why I'd prefer disc brakes.
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Old 11-14-2018, 12:13 PM   #22
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It's why diesel engines have to have a separate vacuum pump since the engine has no restriction on air intake




It's because a turbocharged engine does not make vacuum. The air intake sde of the engine is under pressure from the turbo. A non turbo (naturally aspirated) engine has to suck it's own air in with the piston moving down in the cylinder, and that is what creates the vacuum.


The separate vacuum pump is to run accessories, like brake booster, move vent doors, etc.
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Old 11-15-2018, 05:16 PM   #23
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It's why diesel engines have to have a separate vacuum pump since the engine has no restriction on air intake




It's because a turbocharged engine does not make vacuum. The air intake sde of the engine is under pressure from the turbo. A non turbo (naturally aspirated) engine has to suck it's own air in with the piston moving down in the cylinder, and that is what creates the vacuum.


The separate vacuum pump is to run accessories, like brake booster, move vent doors, etc.
A naturally aspirated diesel will not pull a vacuum.

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My observation is if gasoline engines are equal or better than diesel engines in terms of capability, maintenance and operating costs, big rigs would be running gasoline engines.
.
Back in the mid '70s I would, on a good day, start with a truck+trailer load of sand, grossing 110,000+. Drop the trailer, and haul 40,000-44,000 lbs loads on the truck most of the day. Quitting time, hook up the trailer, run little over a hundred miles, load coal for power plant. Gross +/- 80,000. For 2 summers I did all this with a 427 GMC. The next year, same work 568 CID, diesel. Then I got a 855 inch. Yes, I burned a lot of gas with that 427, but a lifetime of bigger and bigger engines to do the work running the numbers, has shown me something. If I could earn a living grossing 60,000, and running 5000 miles a year I would want to run a old gas motor, compared to the expense of a modern emission controlled diesel...
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Old 11-15-2018, 09:40 PM   #24
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Scooby, that 427 is got to be one of the boss engines of all time. Somebody wrote in a said the new big block V-8s would produce more than 400 lbs of torque. The 427 would produce that right off the showroom floor.

The best towing gas truck that I'm personally aware of is a 454 one an a half ton dually owned by a guy that owns a land clearing business.
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Old 11-15-2018, 10:10 PM   #25
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If you do go with a gasser, you may want to check into a fifth wheel with disc brakes. I tow a 17,000 GVW fifth with a 08 Dodge 3500 diesel, (and yes, I know I'm overloaded). For the first two years, I had the standard drum brakes. The braking was marginal, even after being replaced and adjusted for the famous, "Lippert greasy brake fiasco." With the disc brakes, it will brake very well, even if I don't use the exhaust brake.

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Do you know the legal aspects of towing overweight?
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Old 11-16-2018, 06:18 AM   #26
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Scooby, that 427 is got to be one of the boss engines of all time. Somebody wrote in a said the new big block V-8s would produce more than 400 lbs of torque. The 427 would produce that right off the showroom floor.
Yes, the 427 would do the job. My trucks where old. Most of the guys I worked with where running diesels. Working in the city, not pulling the trailers, the 6-71s where in my way. A 318 Detroit, or a NA Cummins would load behind me all day long. (Carrying the same loads their Gross Weight was 3-4,000 heavier) And a point to this thread, when I switched to the diesels, brakes did not last as long. The plant was at the top of a pretty steep 1/4 mile long hill. Going up with a big load of sand, main in 1, aux in 2, and just hold the RPM with throttle. Coming down, 2+direct, let the air tank "mufflers" talk. The diesels, much faster up, but down, the brakes will be hot when get to the street...
I would still like to see a comparison, like sized engines, a diesel with exhaust brake/ gas engine with throttle plate, for braking hp.
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