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Old 07-07-2004, 04:39 PM   #15
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A pyrometer is the device that mounted in the exhaust system, and connected to a guage in the cab, gives you the EGT (exhaust gas temp.) Since my primary interest was turbo cool down, I mounted mine post turbo, but now and then when pulling a long grade with the fiver, I wish I had manifold temps too. Some mount a pyrometer in both the exhaust manifold and in the turbo housing. They can both feed the same guage with a selector switch.

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Old 07-08-2004, 04:49 PM   #16
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Have a look at a couple of references.

First, The Diesel Stop at http://forums.thedieselstop.com/ubbthreads/? is an excellent discussion forum for all thing Ford Diesel. If you search there for EGT gauges and Turbo Temperature Monitor or TTM, you will get a million hits. Those subject are regularly discussed. There are probably equivalent sites for the Dodge or Chevy drivers, but I've never visited them.

Second, for guages and the TTM, have a look at Diesel Injection Service at http://www.dieselpage.com/iss32.htm . They have a pretty good explanation of what this thing does and why it is important. They also offer very good customer service.
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Old 07-08-2004, 06:52 PM   #17
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I abused my truck until I got a Banks EGT gage. Today I towed 10,000# from Los Vegas to Bakersfield. In the past I would just put the pedal to the metal on a hill, now I watch the EGT and when it reaches 1250 I back off and keep it between 1200 and 1250. It means slowing to 50 mph on some hills. When stopping I used to wait 30 seconds to a minute and then shut down the engine. Now I wait till the EGT gets to 350, which can take several minutes before I shut down. Without an EGT readout you can be damaging your turbo charger. A pyrometer reads out the temperature in a gage that most of us calll the EGT. If you are adding gages also add at least a transmission temperature gage too.
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Old 07-09-2004, 04:29 AM   #18
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Quote "I went to a diesel seminar last year and was told that the cool down period was ~3 minutes. Dave is right on about fueling with the engine ideling- diesel is only 40 octaine and you would have a hard time igniting it from a spark. I've never seen a trucker shut down while fueling and they do it for a living. keep the enging hot!"
Having owned several "big" diesels I'm going to disagree with you. With the new electronic diesels and you're pulling a load the EGT is high. BUT by the time you pull off and park or stop at the fuel pump the temp is down. As for "never seen a trucker shutting down engines while fueling" you haven't watched or been around owner operators very much. Idling costs money my last "Cummins" used about 1 gallon of fuel an hour while idling, to keep warm which is very expensive heat.
Diesel fuel is not measured by octane but by "Cetane" (sp).
Also starting a cold engine it is ok to move, as soon as you have oil and/or air pressure, slowly until everything has reached operating temperatures.
I don't mean to imply I'm an expert nut I never had a diesel engine failure in over 1 1/2 millions miles of being a O/O.
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Old 07-09-2004, 07:38 PM   #19
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Mounting the pyrometer is a personal decision. Some folks swear by the pre-turbo as the most accurate exhaust reading.
Others ( like myself) added a Banks system and the downpipe off the turbo had a bung welded in place for the pyrometer and that is post-turbo.
The difference between pre and post is around 300 degrees. That means my red line EGT is 900 degrees post turbo. Which is equal to 1200 degrees preturbo.
Towing and guages should be a package option offered by all of the Big Three.
Cool down is essential. One way to let the truck do its thing is to install a Turbo Temp Monitor made by ISSPRO. The work with the Pyrometer and monitor the EGT's after the ignition is turned off. It allows the engine to idle until EGT;s are at 300 degrees then shuts the engine down. Works well and is fairly inexpensive.
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Old 07-10-2004, 04:02 AM   #20
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Well, Im learning alot and thank all.. I have been doing seaches and cant seem to figure out what you mean by post or pre.. (oh ohhh Stupid alert..)
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Old 07-10-2004, 10:12 AM   #21
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One of the folks at www.ford-diesel.com should be able to advise how to mount EGT.

Mine is post turbo. george
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Old 07-10-2004, 10:24 AM   #22
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pre turbo (before the turbo) post turbo (after the turbo). The reason for the pyrometer is to have an indication of the temperature of the exhaust gas that is entering the turbo. If you feed the turbo exhuast gas that is above 1200 degrees F or so and you will cook the turbo. Pre turbo just does not make sense to me. First off, you need to constantly make this conversion of 300 degrees. Which I cant believe is a constant and suitable for all trucks. Second, why not know what is going in the turbo, not out? Some have concerns of preturbo. First, if the pyrometer probe ever breaks off it will get flung into the turbo. My answer is big deal, turbo wheels are $60 and a day of labor. Second, the metal shavings will get into the turbo. My answer is...if that really worries you, take the exhuast manifold off first, then drill and tap. I drilled mine with it installed, used a magnet and shop vac to remove what little metal shavins remained. Fact is, unless you are going to add an after market down tube with a threaded bung in it, you are going to have to drill a hole and most likly tap it. Drilling holes is really not a big deal, in fact towing an RV is an exercise in hole drilling. Ya gotta drill a hole for the hitch, wiring, aux. fuel tank, gauges. Besides drilling holes (removing weight) decreases you curb weight, thus increasing your towing capacity. But seriously, if you are going to tow heavy and/or have made horsepower modifications, you need to know what the temperature of your exhaust gas is as well as you turbo boost and automatic transmission temperature. You then will know when the turbo has cooled down and then shutdown your truck. If you are lazy like me, I have a TTM (turbo temp minder) which automatically shuts down the truck at 250 degrees F of pre-turbo temperature. Happy drillng!
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Old 07-16-2004, 05:49 AM   #23
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When towing, I sometimes had to idle my Ford as long as five minutes for the turbo to cool properly. A pain when you stop at a rest stop to use the rest room and cool down takes as long as the potty break. (I suppose I could leave it running if someone stays with truck.)

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Old 07-16-2004, 06:10 PM   #24
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I believe I abused my truck until I got three gages installed. Exhaust Gas Temperature I now know that climbing some hills towing 10K I overheated my turbo charger by flooring my truck. Now at 1250 I disengage cruise control and back off the throttle to 1200. When shutting down I watch the EGT and don't turn off the truck untill the EGT drops to 350. The other gages are turbo air pressure and transmission oil temperature. At slow speeds I watch tranny temperature and shift down as necessary to control tranny temperature. When stopped when the tranny temp reaches 200 I put the brake on ans shift to neutral. Get these gages and protect your truck from damage.
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Old 07-17-2004, 08:55 AM   #25
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Technical correction: Diesel fuel tendency to ignite spontaneously is normally not measured by octane but by cetane numbers.


CETANE NUMBER AND
OCTANE NUMBER
Cetane number (diesel fuel) and octane
number (gasoline) both measure the
tendency of the fuel to ignite spontaneously.
In the cetane number scale,
high values represent fuels that ignite
readily and, therefore, perform better
in a diesel engine. In the octane number
scale, high values represent fuels
that resist spontaneous ignition and,
therefore, have less tendency to knock
in a gasoline engine. Because both
scales were developed so that higher
numbers represent higher quality for
the respective use, high cetane number
fuels have low octane numbers, and
vice versa.

From the Chevron diesel Fuels Review
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Old 07-17-2004, 09:58 AM   #26
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Smokey from www.thedieselstop.com has had both the pre and post probes in at the same time. The statement is correct that the 300 degrees the exhaust drops from pre to post is not constant is very true. He claims it can be less than that to almost double that which is 600 degrees.
The caution of the probe braking off and destroying the turbo, if it does happen, is so rare that it is a non issue. Knowing the temp of the gas going into the turbo is important for the protection of the turbo but more important, it is a better indication of the closeness of the pistons to do a meltdown as well.
Post turbo tells you very little except what the exhaust temp is coming out of the turbo. If you check, Banks puts the bung in the down tube but recommends pre turbo monitoring for the best in protecting you engine.
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Old 07-17-2004, 10:02 AM   #27
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by george1:
One of the folks at http://www.ford-diesel.com should be able to advise how to mount EGT.

Mine is post turbo. george <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Now www.thedieselstop.com
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Old 07-18-2004, 07:41 AM   #28
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"EGT" is Exhaust Gas Temperature, "Pyrometer is a sensor to detect "EGT", and the "EGT Gauge" is the device to display the "EGT" detected by the "Pyrometer".
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