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Old 07-27-2015, 01:33 AM   #1
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New to towing - some clarification please? !

First off, I am a noob to TT's, so go easy on me
I have posted this question elsewhere, as I am trying to get as many ideas and opinions as possible. I have targeted our first TT purchase, and it will be an Arctic Fox 19B, or a Nash 19B. Both are preowned units. The AF is year 2000, and the Nash is a 2007.

I wonder if I'm good to tow one of the above TT's with my 2008 Silverado 1500.
It seems like there are so many half ton pickups towing big TT's, yet the on-line towing calculator I used seemed to suggest that these two trailers would be too much. Either there are many people towing while overweight out there, or I am missing something. (I'm betting it's me!) I must be inputting something wrong, or interpreting the results incorrectly... Hopefully someone can set me at ease here.

Specs:
The Nash has a dry weight of 3750lbs, GVW of 7000.
Hitch weight is about 350lbs.
The AF is slightly heavier with a dry weight of 4380lbs, but still a GVW of 7000. Hitch weight about 400.

My Silverado is an extended cab standard box. GVW of 7000lbs, GAWR front and rear are both 3950. From my manual, the max combined GVW is 13000, and the max trailer weight is 7500, and my truck has the 5.3l V8, 3:73 gearing.

I will have my DW and 2 dogs in the truck. What say you?
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Old 07-27-2015, 03:57 AM   #2
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You might be able to tow them, but I don't think you will be happy. Your tongue weight should be 10 percent of your trailer weight, making it 700 lbs loaded.

From your GVW, you must subtract anything you put in the truck, passengers, pets, extra camping gear etc. As you can see as soon as you put anything in the truck other than the driver and a full tank of fuel, you rapidly run our of towing capacity.

I would suggest a larger truck or smaller trailer.
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Old 07-27-2015, 04:52 AM   #3
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You don't need a bigger truck. The heavier AF is 4400 lbs empty. I know you will not tow empty so estimate 1500lbs of stuff added the trailer. That is only 5900 lbs. well under your 7500 lb max trailer weight.
For an example I had a larger trailer and loaded for a week at the beach I was only 1400lbs over the unloaded weight of my trailer.
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Old 07-27-2015, 04:55 AM   #4
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Those trailers are not big, I would tow either one of them with a half ton.
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Old 07-27-2015, 06:22 AM   #5
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Those trailers can be towed by your truck easy. You can buy either trailer, test tow and then report back. Typically you will need weight distribution hitch and / or a sway control hitch.

Make sure all tires, both on the truck and on the trailer are fully inflated.

I was able to tow a 5,500 lb trailer with a F-150 comfortably. I knew the trailer was there but with a WD hitch I was good to go.

Good luck
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Old 07-27-2015, 06:36 AM   #6
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I don't think you should have a problem towing either trailer. But, check the tires on your truck and if they are "P" rated tires, replace them with a good LT tire. I pulled my trailer with P tires and then realized that they weren't a good tire for towing and replaced with LT tires and towing performance is much better. Unless you really need any extra features of the AF, I'd go with the Nash trailer and take advantage of getting a much newer trailer and avoid the extra weight of the AF.

Enjoy!
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Old 07-27-2015, 08:55 AM   #7
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Sounds like either trailer will be a good match for the truck. LT tires and a good WDH will make for easier and more comfortable towing. Check the age of the trailer tires as they should be replaced at 6 years of service (4 digit code on sidewall - last 2 digits is year, 1st 2 digits is week of the year) and FYI, trailer tires are rated to 65 mph. Happy Camping!
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Old 07-27-2015, 09:19 AM   #8
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Think you are good to go !!! Artic Fox great
all season trailler.
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Old 07-27-2015, 10:15 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by popcan View Post

Specs:
The Nash has a dry weight of 3750lbs, GVW of 7000.
Hitch weight is about 350lbs.


The AF is slightly heavier with a dry weight of 4380lbs, but still a GVW of 7000. Hitch weight about 400.
Dry weight is understated, therefore the hitch weight is understated. Expect actual dry weight of the Artic Fox to be closer to 4,800 pounds, with wet and loaded weight around 6,000 pounds if you travel light and with empty holding tanks. Hitch weight will average 12.5% but could go as high as 15% of gross trailer weight. So assume hitch weight of at least 750 pounds.

Quote:
From my manual, the max combined GVW is 13000, and the max trailer weight is 7500, and my truck has the 5.3l V8, 3:73 gearing.
You have plenty of truck to PULL the 6,000-pounds trailer. But you'll probably be overloaded over the payload capacity of the Chevy with 750 pounds of tongue weight.

Quote:
I will have my DW and 2 dogs in the truck. What say you?
My rig is similar with GVWR of 7,100 dragging a 5,000 pound TT with 650 pounds tongue weight. When on the road with DW and 2 dogs (40-ound Border Collie and 10-pound Chihuahua), I'm slightly overloaded by 100 pounds over the GVWR. But I haul a toolbox full of tools and a camper shell to weatherproof the bed, so if you haul minimum tools and no shell, you could probably tow my TT without being overloaded, and maybe you could tow the Nash without exceeding the GVWR of your half-ton pickup.

Assuming you don't want to be overloaded, then load the truck with everyone and everything that will be in it when towing - including the head from your weight-distributing hitch. Drive to a truckstop that has a CAT scale and fill up with gas. Then weigh the wet and loaded tow vehicle (TV). Subtract the weight of the TV from the GVWR of the TV, and the answer is the max tongue weight you can tow without being overloaded. If the answer is less than 750 pounds, then skip the Artic Fox. The Nash is less weight because it's not a 4-seasons trailer. If you don't need the 4-seasons capability, then go for the lighter trailer.
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Old 07-27-2015, 12:54 PM   #10
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Get good tires for the truck and trailer and a good WDH with built in sway control and you will be fine with either of those trailers and your current truck.
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Old 07-27-2015, 01:28 PM   #11
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Remember not all that long ago all the Auto Companies were running commercials where their small pickups were towing loads that would give a Semi-Tractor pause and they were yammering about how strong their trucks were... Well they can tow immense loads.. On a closed course, at very low speed. But do not try it in real life situations.

The next thing you need to know is the definition of PROBLEM to a salesman. To a salesman there is one and only one problem.... You walking out the door without a signature on the contract.

So if you ask him "Can my way too small truck tow this way too big trailer" he will say "NO PROBLEM" because to him.. that is not a problem. epically if you put your signature on the line. (He is telling the truth from his standpoint,, it's your problem, not his).

You are doing the right thing by researching online as you might actually find truth here.. It seems you have a decent handle on it.

If you want a truck that CAN tow the trailer (I do not care what trailer you choose. Biggest Voltage made.. NO PROBLEM) See if you can track down Trail-Haulers.. I used to have a link to Wil-Ro trucks but alas it's not working last I( checked.. Their trucks can do the juob.

(Peterbuilt Semi Tractors rigged for RV towing).
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Old 07-27-2015, 02:35 PM   #12
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good to go

buy the one you like, get the right hitch check the tires. tow it for awhile

and see how it goes. you can always get a larger truck but i think

you'll be fine.

Jim
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Old 07-27-2015, 04:23 PM   #13
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Thanks all, for the informative replies.
I believe I will aggressively try to make a deal on the Arctic Fox first, and if not, then the Nash. But really, either one will make me happy.

I will be investing in a good WDH, with sway control etc. It seems like that is not a good place to go cheap on.


Hopefully I can report back in a couple weeks with pics....
thanks again!
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Old 07-27-2015, 05:48 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by popcan View Post
First off, I am a noob to TT's, so go easy on me
I have posted this question elsewhere, as I am trying to get as many ideas and opinions as possible. I have targeted our first TT purchase, and it will be an Arctic Fox 19B, or a Nash 19B. Both are preowned units. The AF is year 2000, and the Nash is a 2007.

I wonder if I'm good to tow one of the above TT's with my 2008 Silverado 1500.
It seems like there are so many half ton pickups towing big TT's, yet the on-line towing calculator I used seemed to suggest that these two trailers would be too much. Either there are many people towing while overweight out there, or I am missing something. (I'm betting it's me!) I must be inputting something wrong, or interpreting the results incorrectly... Hopefully someone can set me at ease here.

Specs:
The Nash has a dry weight of 3750lbs, GVW of 7000.
Hitch weight is about 350lbs.
The AF is slightly heavier with a dry weight of 4380lbs, but still a GVW of 7000. Hitch weight about 400.

My Silverado is an extended cab standard box. GVW of 7000lbs, GAWR front and rear are both 3950. From my manual, the max combined GVW is 13000, and the max trailer weight is 7500, and my truck has the 5.3l V8, 3:73 gearing.

I will have my DW and 2 dogs in the truck. What say you?
===================
If you stay 10% (some say more) under your TV and TT maximum ratings to allow for safety reserve capacity (it seems more attention is warranted for risk/worst case scenarios) you will have a good TV/TT match, IF you address the following considerations as you indicated you are a "noob";
Truck
-tires/spare load range E min.
-trans cooler
-HD cooling
-High capacity alternator
-class IV hitch receiver
-Weight distribution/Sway control hitch
-trailer brake controller

TT
-tires/spare (I carry two) load range D min.
-install TPMS
-distribute tongue weight to achieve ~12% of TT weight
-install backup camera
-Speed under 60 mph, contrary to the opinion of others

Go to a CAT scale loaded as you would for a trip and then afterward based on the actual weight/distribution, make weight distribution adjustments (keeping track of the weight being redistributed) to achieve your desired weight numbers If you moved a lot of weight around you may want to weight again after. BTW, on each future trip you will want to be consistent with this baseline load analysis.

These were the basics for my rig setup plus others to address my risk tolerance level.
Happy Travels!
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