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Old 09-13-2014, 08:42 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnandcaren View Post
I agree and understand BUT where the heck can I get pin weight capacities for a truck.
I have looked online a lot, and I have found many truck towing capacity charts and lists. They all give the towing capacity, but ONLY one number, the total weight. So for a given truck it may say you can tow 12,000 or 16,000 pounds. But NOWHERE can I find a chart / table of "PIN WEIGHT capacities.

I have read its on the door of the truck, but we will purchase both a truck and a 5th wheel over the next month and I need data to be informed and safe in our travels. So I can't look on a door. I need to know if I'm looking at say a 2006 Ford F-350 SRW what will that handle and do I need OR Not need a DRW.


Any ideas? Anyone?
Pin weight is no more than cargo carrying capacity and axle load. Just buy a truck that will carry a xxxxx# box in the bed. That box is your pin weight capacity. Your hitch will put your load directly over your rear axle or slightly ahead of it.
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Old 09-13-2014, 08:48 PM   #16
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I have a question for the OP, any insight on why you are making the switch? We have been thinking the opposite (going to a 36' class A). After getting close to pulling the trigger I got stage fright on the repair costs (ie, freight liner /cummins/etc). The repair costs to keep my 3500 cummins dually and 35' trailer running are pretty small by comparison.
You hit the nail square and true. i had a 350 Cat in my Freightliner chassis DP36. You go in for an oil change and come out with an $1100 bill.

Extra costs for filters, fuel and oil, extra for generator, extra for air filter. On and on and on. It is great to own if you can afford it.

I am much much happier buying a new well designed all aluminum framed ultra light trailer and towing beautifully with F150 XLT. I have a 31 foot. A trailer a few years older -- stick and tin -- slightly smaller (29') weighed 2500 pounds dry more than mine. Just enough to need a 3/4 ton and diesel.
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Old 09-13-2014, 10:27 PM   #17
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From OP:

1. What does "problematic" mean on the 6.0 L diesel?

2. How about a GM Duramax with an Allison? I had the Allison in my MH and loved it. But is the Duramax "problematic"?

3. Any "years" on GM to avoid since you guys know about the Ford year 2011 deal?

As far as pin weight, I'll figure it out. I was hoping for a table with clear info, but the math is easy. Just some digging.

PS The unit we've found and like the most is an older National 5er, 32 ft, with UVW of 12,225 and GVWR of 16,000 although it will never get over 13 to 13.5k actual weight.
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Old 09-14-2014, 08:19 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnandcaren View Post
From OP:

1. What does "problematic" mean on the 6.0 L diesel?
Using the language of Consumer Reports, much worse than average reliability for stock engines. It's not the end of the world, because there are ways to modify the engine to make it bulletproof, but the fixes are complicated and cost a few thousand bucks, so most folks don't bother getting it done until they're broke down on the side of the road a coupla thousand miles from home.

You can become an expert on the 6.0L engine and it's problems and fixes by reading the 6.0L forum on Diesel Forum - TheDieselStop.com

One advantage of the lousy reputation of the 6.0L engine is that you can buy a used one for several thousand dollars less than it would otherwise sell for. That may be enough to pay for the mods necessary to bulletproof the engine, if you have the time and knowledge of what needs to be done.

Another advantage of the 6.0L engine is the 5R110 automatic tranny that it comes with. Outstanding modern tranny with tow/haul mode.

Quote:
PS The unit we've found and like the most is an older National 5er, 32 ft, with UVW of 12,225 and GVWR of 16,000 although it will never get over 13 to 13.5k actual weight.
It's okay to underestimate the gross weight of the trailer as long as you don't use that estimate to justify an SRW pickup instead of a dually to tow it with. That trailer requires a dually to tow it without overloading the tow vehicle. And even an older dually won't be enough truck. For a Ford, you need at least a 2005-up F-350 DRW with 23,500 pounds GCWR and 13,000 GVWR to tow that trailer without being overloaded.
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Old 09-14-2014, 12:56 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by johnandcaren View Post

PS The unit we've found and like the most is an older National 5er, 32 ft, with UVW of 12,225 and GVWR of 16,000 although it will never get over 13 to 13.5k actual weight.
??? If you put propane, water, clothing, dishes, cooking utensils and bedding on board you will be at that.

What about BEER?
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Old 09-14-2014, 02:55 PM   #20
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I have had 5 fifth wheels and now I'm in our 2nd class A. I have had Chevy and Ford diesel trucks both single and dual rear wheel. Long story short - get a Ford F350 dually, in as nice a level as you can afford. (King ranch, lariat, etc) My experience has been that towing a fifth wheel is actually easier than driving the class A's, because... you can back up a 5th wheel if you get in a real tight situation. Not so easy when towing a class A with a toad - you better know you can make that turn! You need about the same logistics turning and such but you can always unhook at the camp ground and go get fuel for the truck. Hope this helps.
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Old 09-14-2014, 06:32 PM   #21
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There is a currently unspoken problem with duallys that has not been mentioned in this forum. The four wheels per axle have less traction than SRW trucks. If you can get a SRW 350 with proper rating, or even a 250 with proper rating you will do better in slippery conditions. I had a friend who called his dually "the lead sled" Could not pull squat on ice.
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Old 09-14-2014, 10:40 PM   #22
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There is a currently unspoken problem with duallys that has not been mentioned in this forum. The four wheels per axle have less traction than SRW trucks. If you can get a SRW 350 with proper rating, or even a 250 with proper rating you will do better in slippery conditions. I had a friend who called his dually "the lead sled" Could not pull squat on ice.
Kiwi is right. Duallys are like a pig on ice skates. I had a 08 F450 4X2, the truck could pull but it was ridiculous in snow or mud. One day I was stuck 5 times. I have the Ram now and its four wheel drive, but the truth of it is that when it isn't pulling its a garage queen.

The big caveat to this is that "most" of us are using our duallys for pulling. I'm not trying to say that a 1 ton dually is in the Heavy Duty Truck category but payload and trailer weights pushed me to a dually plus they make for more stable ride in crosswinds with 3 or 4000 lbs on the pin box.



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Old 09-15-2014, 01:44 PM   #23
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I traded my 37' 4 slide Cedar Creek 5er for a motor home. you dont have to swing any wider than you did with your bus. (i have a 40' bus) I have towed it with a 2007 Ford F-260 with the power stroke diesel and did just fine up and down hills and mountains. Sometimes you forget its behind you till you go to stop ha. I have fueled up at most of the stations around and can get in and out without any problems, You just have to plan your stops to make sure you can get in and out fairly easily. the truck can usually pull more with a 5th wheel than a bumper pull but as far as pin weight, I dont think you will have any problem with ANY fifth wheel. Mine weighed 14200 empty and I jerked it all over the states..Good luck
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Old 09-15-2014, 06:34 PM   #24
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There is a currently unspoken problem with duallys that has not been mentioned in this forum. The four wheels per axle have less traction than SRW trucks. If you can get a SRW 350 with proper rating, or even a 250 with proper rating you will do better in slippery conditions. I had a friend who called his dually "the lead sled" Could not pull squat on ice.
Probably like me had ribbed tires on it cause he thought he would only use it for towing. Once changed to lug tires the traction is quite acceptable.

Not as good as a 4 x 4 of course but will work OK. If there are issues throw a couple hundred pounds of weight in the back. Makes the ride better as well.
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Old 09-15-2014, 08:51 PM   #25
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Probably like me had ribbed tires on it cause he thought he would only use it for towing. Once changed to lug tires the traction is quite acceptable.

Not as good as a 4 x 4 of course but will work OK. If there are issues throw a couple hundred pounds of weight in the back. Makes the ride better as well.
+1,

Think lugged tires make a big difference, and adding a few hundred pounds over or in front of the rear axle helps a lot. My last Fire / EMS assignment operated a one ton GMC response truck with 2 wheel drive, in the Sierras near Tahoe. Having a 200 gallon water tank, self contained pump engine and a bunch of equipment in the utility sides helped a lot. Prior to that drove 3/4 ton 4x4's that didn't do any better on slick pavement. Frankly preferred that 4x2 with appropriate weight distribution and lower center of gravity...And saw many 4x4's that had lost control and run off the road.
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