RV Trip Planning Discussions

Go Back   iRV2 Forums > TRAVEL TRAILER, 5th WHEEL & TRUCK CAMPER FORUMS > Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-10-2019, 08:56 AM   #15
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 6
The cracks on the rims were located on the inside and where the spoke hits the outside edge of the rim. Not near the lug nuts.

My other thought is to go back to stock 18" rims with larger tires. My truck came with the Moto wheels and I added the 35's.

Are the stock rims strong enough? I would guess so since that is what would have originally come with the truck.

Also, I do have the cracked rim and I am going to try to contact Moto Metal about the issue to see what they have to say.
__________________

makolab is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 01-10-2019, 09:01 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 1,356
Stock rims should be strong enough
__________________

__________________
2014 Raptor 300MP, 2014 Cowboy Cadillac - Ram 3500 Crew Cab Long Bed Longhorn 6.7 Cummins Turbo Diesel DRW 4.10 Rear End, 5588 Payload, Firestone Airbags, Curt Q20, TST507
raineman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2019, 07:24 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
jimcumminsw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Oswego IL
Posts: 1,474
Quote:
Originally Posted by makolab View Post
The cracks on the rims were located on the inside and where the spoke hits the outside edge of the rim. Not near the lug nuts.

My other thought is to go back to stock 18" rims with larger tires. My truck came with the Moto wheels and I added the 35's.

Are the stock rims strong enough? I would guess so since that is what would have originally come with the truck.

Also, I do have the cracked rim and I am going to try to contact Moto Metal about the issue to see what they have to say.
You need to do a google search on your brand of aftermarket rims. I did this and picked out Mickey Thompson SideBiter II rims these are rated for 3,640 LBS each, were other rims in Mickey Thompson line were rated for 2,600 each. Not all aftermarket rims will support the weight required for towing a heavy fiver.

Just a suggestion as to why the rims may have cracked.
__________________
Jim & Jill
Sold: 2010 318SAB Cougar:New: 2016 Cedar Creek 34RL. 2008 Dodge 6.7LCummins the original 6.7L engine, w/68RFE Auto
jimcumminsw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2019, 06:41 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 453
Quote:
Originally Posted by makolab View Post
Are the stock rims strong enough? I would guess so since that is what would have originally come with the truck.

Trucks are designed where the tires are the weakest link in the drive train and the gvwr is based, a large part, on the tires. Hence, stock rims are strong enough if your anywhere close to your gvwr. Get rims that exceed the rating of the tires.
fvstringpicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2019, 08:27 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 876
Quote:
Originally Posted by fvstringpicker View Post
Trucks are designed where the tires are the weakest link in the drive train and the gvwr is based, a large part, on the tires. Hence, stock rims are strong enough if your anywhere close to your gvwr. Get rims that exceed the rating of the tires.
Not sure about that. Every truck I have owned the OEM tires where higher rated than axle or gross rating.
ScoobyDoo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2019, 08:50 AM   #20
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 6
Thanks for all of your input. Yesterday I was able to contact the wheel manufacturer about my issue with the rims. I must say that the rep I spoke with was an absolute smarta** and was of no help whatsoever. He did not seem to interested in the problem and blamed it on "hitting curbs and potholes." The only help I received was that he was willing to sell me a new wheel. How nice. How generous. I declined.
makolab is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2019, 04:38 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 453
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScoobyDoo View Post
Not sure about that. Every truck I have owned the OEM tires where higher rated than axle or gross rating.

If you check with a junk yard with a crusher, they tell you the axles are the last. A typical full size automobile axle is designed to take a load in excess of 10,000 lbs before it will bend.
Most important if the OEM tires will carry the load, the OEM rims specs out higher than the OEM tires and will carry the load.

Of course with the cheap metal and material coming out of China, the specs are likely over generous.
fvstringpicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2019, 04:50 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 876
Quote:
Originally Posted by fvstringpicker View Post
If you check with a junk yard with a crusher, they tell you the axles are the last. A typical full size automobile axle is designed to take a load in excess of 10,000 lbs before it will bend.
Most important if the OEM tires will carry the load, the OEM rims specs out higher than the OEM tires and will carry the load.

Of course with the cheap metal and material coming out of China, the specs are likely over generous.
There is no doubt that axle shafts are the hardest part of a vehicle. Very unlikely to bend. Hit a OEM wheel with a grinder, you will see it's pretty hard. But put your face cross to the load tag on the pillar, read the front and rear axle load ratings. While there, look at GVWR. Now stick face next to the tire, check the load rating on it...
ScoobyDoo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2019, 04:55 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 453
Quote:
Originally Posted by makolab View Post
He did not seem to interested in the problem and blamed it on "hitting curbs and potholes." The only help I received was that he was willing to sell me a new wheel. How nice. How generous. I declined.

Looking back at your post, the likely problem with the rims is they are cast constructed. The cast process of pouring molten aluminum into molds often leads to inconsistencies in the material and reduction in structural integrity, causing the cracks. You need to consider is going to stronger and lighter forged rims.

They are more expensive but look at it like hammers and other tools. Forged tools are head an shoulders above cast tools.
fvstringpicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2019, 05:22 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 453
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScoobyDoo View Post
T But put your face cross to the load tag on the pillar, read the front and rear axle load ratings. While there, look at GVWR. Now stick face next to the tire, check the load rating on it...

Scooby, my rear axle rating is higher, albeit only slightly higher, than the OEM tires. Of course the drive train components are higher than the GVWR. But I have a 2007 vehicle.
Notwithstanding, I think I am right advising Makolab to ditch the cast rims. You couldn't give me a set of cast rims. Not these days.
fvstringpicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2019, 06:12 AM   #25
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 876
Quote:
Originally Posted by fvstringpicker View Post
Scooby, my rear axle rating is higher, albeit only slightly higher, than the OEM tires.
If this is true, it is rare. Are you sure the tires are to OEM specs?

Quote:
Of course the drive train components are higher than the GVWR. But I have a 2007 vehicle.
Don't understand what you are saying here. Of course the drive train is designed for the GCVWR.

Quote:
Notwithstanding, I think I am right advising Makolab to ditch the cast rims. You couldn't give me a set of cast rims. Not these days.
I will agree about cast rims. But unless he weighs it he can't know where he stands.
From running wide tires on hot rods, I know that what helps performance on dry pavement can make you grab a double handful of seat, with both hands on the wheel when it gets wet. Ok, as long as I have something else to drive if I need to go every day. And towing with oversized tires? Not even getting into problems with ride height, the OEMs decrease GCWR when they install higher speed gear ratio. Most people that mount big tires on there pickup can't regear to match OEM performance with MT truck. Add the multiplied effect of a trailer to poor traction...What do we call non-repairable?
ScoobyDoo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2019, 12:57 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
keymastr's Avatar
 
Outdoors RV Owners Club
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 1,941
Well, you listed the brochure weights which is never very accurate but assuming the gross trailer weight is accurate your loaded trailer will be pushing around 2500 pounds of pin weight, (12,500 X 20% = 2500), and could be as high as 3000 depending on how you are loaded. Add to that the hitch and everything you carry in the truck besides yourself and you could very well be over the capacity of your truck by 1000 pounds depending on what you carry. A 2 pass scale trip is less than $20, can be done from your drivers seat with the exception of dropping the trailer for 1 pass, and takes seconds other than dropping trailer and hooking back up.

Get the CAT scale app for your phone and watch a youtube video showing how to use the scale. No need to interact with a clerk or even talk to anyone, the app does it all for you. No reason not to know your weights and how they are distributed across your axles. That will go a long way to showing why parts are failing. Just a guess but pretty sure you are overweight or right on the edge.
__________________
2017 Creekside 23 RBS
2016 F250 Super Crew XLT
Kennewick, WA.
keymastr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2019, 02:27 PM   #27
Senior Member
 
Wireman1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 310
To much offset with the aftermarket wheel could be putting a lot of stress on the wheel when towing.

Also more stress on the axle bearings and components.
__________________

__________________
Wireman
Wireman1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
tow



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Numerous Electrical Issues norcalhemi Monaco Owner's Forum 11 05-09-2016 01:01 PM
Numerous Issues with Baroness norcalhemi Monaco Owner's Forum 11 09-30-2014 11:35 AM
MCD Shades Featured by Numerous Exhibitors at 5th Annual Elkhart Open House DriVer RV Industry Press 0 09-20-2012 10:26 PM
Numerous Motorhome issues mythplaced Class A Motorhome Discussions 22 05-02-2010 01:33 PM
Outlook Express sends numerous emails RedT Technology: Internet, TV, Satellite, Cell Phones, etc. 6 04-26-2010 11:35 AM

» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.