Go Back   iRV2 Forums > TRAVEL TRAILER, 5th WHEEL & TRUCK CAMPER FORUMS > Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-16-2015, 05:41 PM   #15
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 1,346
Quote:
Originally Posted by jayman_1975 View Post
Mine is a 2012 2500HD Duramax GFX. The tire max load is 3300lbs per tire. There is no way I'm exceeding 6600lbs on the back axle. But I don't know what the rear axle limit is, I'll have to try and find it on the truck when I get home from work.

My other option would be to remove my quad deck and just carry one quad in the back of the truck and look into something like this unit to carry the other one on the back of the trailer. Not sure if this is a safe idea or not.

ATV Carrier for RV | RV ATV Carrier | Motorhome ATV Carrier | Electric ATV Carrier | ATV Lift

Do not exceed 6,600# on the rear tires. Weigh your rear axle! Don't be so sure.
__________________

__________________
Cummins12V98 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 08-16-2015, 08:34 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,082
Quote:
The GVWR on my truck alone is 10000lbs. When my quads are loaded on my quad deck and then my camper hitch is attached to my receiver, the truck weighs 10800lbs. As much as I would like to think I would be ok.... I'm sure that puts my truck overweight. I'm not referring to my towing capacity.
DOT doesn't give out overweight tickets for being over any truck makers GVWR.
Nor will you face any civil lawsuits or insurance refusal to pay out scenario for being over a truck manufacturers GVWR. Hell drive drunk and cause a wreck with injury and insurance still pays out....however they can drop you as a customer.

Your '12 2500 GM product has a 6200 RAWR which includes the axle/ties and wheels.
I doubt your combo exceeds the 6200 RAWR or the trucks FAWR/tire loads ratings which is your biggest safety issue and legal issue unless your state/province has a certain gross weight/tonnage/gross combined weight/etc for tagging and registration purposes.
__________________

__________________
'03 Dodge 2500 Cummins HO 3.73 NV5600 Jacobs
'98 3500 DRW 454 4x4 4.10 crew cab
'97 Park Avanue RK 28' 2 slides
JIMNLIN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 10:52 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 117
Well I will be definitely weighimg my axles seperately to make sure I have plenty of reserve there. Thanks for all the info
__________________
jayman_1975 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 11:12 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
Gordon Dewald's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 10,174
If you are under your rear GAWR as suggested it will mean that your front GAWR is over by more than 800 lbs. This is not usually the case.

Having the front end overloaded is asking for trouble.
__________________
Gordon and Janet
Tour 42QD/inTech Stacker
Gordon Dewald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 03:51 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
Gordon Dewald's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 10,174
Quote:
Originally Posted by JIMNLIN View Post
DOT doesn't give out overweight tickets for being over any truck makers GVWR.
Nor will you face any civil lawsuits or insurance refusal to pay out scenario for being over a truck manufacturers GVWR. Hell drive drunk and cause a wreck with injury and insurance still pays out....however they can drop you as a customer.

Your '12 2500 GM product has a 6200 RAWR which includes the axle/ties and wheels.
I doubt your combo exceeds the 6200 RAWR or the trucks FAWR/tire loads ratings which is your biggest safety issue and legal issue unless your state/province has a certain gross weight/tonnage/gross combined weight/etc for tagging and registration purposes.
I have not heard of DOT Enforcement Branch giving any RV a ticket. I have seen DOT writing small trucks and trailers hauling firewood tickets for being overloaded. These were half and 3/4 tons.

Our Enforcement Branch is also charged with vehicle safety. They can and will inspect any vehicle to ensure it is being operated within its operating capabilities and is not in an unsafe condition.

In our jurisdiction the heavy trucks are licensed for capacity. During the licensing process the truck had to be shown to be able to carry the weight they were licensing for. Thus when you looked at the registration you knew the truck was at or below the manufacturers GVWR. Also the axles were listed.

When we started a gravel or asphalt haul I would contact the Enforcement Branch and each truck that wanted to haul on the project was given a complete inspection. At that time many aspects of the truck were inspected including axle and tire capacity in relation to the licensed weight.

Our biggest issue was the trucks would license a heavy weight with larger tires and then change back to smaller tires. When we caught this we would turn the haul records over to the DOT who would write some fairly substantial tickets. Even though the truckers knew there was a very high chance of getting caught there were a few who could be relied on to give it a try. (There are no or very few secrets on a gravel or asphalt haul).
__________________
Gordon and Janet
Tour 42QD/inTech Stacker
Gordon Dewald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 08:28 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,082
This guy has. If I remember this guy has a toy hauler.

Quote:
JS Kid

Elk Grove, calif.

Full Member

Joined: 01/12/2006
Posted: 05/19/14 09:05pm Link | Quote | Print | Notify Moderator
The requirements to double tow in California:
Commercial Class A with Doubles Endorsement

I have been doing it for 15 years, have been stopped and checked 2 times for proper licenses, weight, length, lights and everything else


John
Its more common than some want to believe ..... .

Quote:
FHWA... Questions and Answers about Vehicle Size and Weight

23 CFR 658.5 Definitions

Q.. What are recreational vehicles?
They are generally a vehicular-type unit primarily designed as temporary living quarters for recreational, camping, travel, or seasonal use that either has its own motive power or is mounted on, or towed by, another vehicle. (From ANSI)

Back to Top
Q.. Are recreational vehicles subject to Federal size and reasonable access requirements?
No, because they are not commercial motor vehicles.

Back to Top
Q.. Are recreational vehicles subject to Interstate axle weight limits?
Yes.

Back to Top
Q.. Are recreational vehicles required to stop at State scale sites?
Each State may set its own requirements.
The registration purpose I was referring to in my reply above wasn't for commercial purposes but for buying a tag or registering a non commercial vehicle which some states require some type of weight number.
Which is foreign to me as my state as others, do not register a non commercial vehicle at any kind of weight.
__________________
'03 Dodge 2500 Cummins HO 3.73 NV5600 Jacobs
'98 3500 DRW 454 4x4 4.10 crew cab
'97 Park Avanue RK 28' 2 slides
JIMNLIN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 10:02 PM   #21
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cummins12V98 View Post
I would be most concerned with the weight on the rear tires. Have you weighed it?
This is important.
That and the tire load rating. Do not exceed the load rating for the tires.
The RAWR is based on the tire load rating capacity!
__________________
bighatnohors is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 10:09 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
Gordon Dewald's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 10,174
Quote:
Originally Posted by bighatnohors View Post
This is important.
That and the tire load rating. Do not exceed the load rating for the tires.
The RAWR is based on the tire load rating capacity!
I think if you look at both the Ford and GM websites you will find a disclaimer that adding airbags, etc does not change the GAWR or GVWR on their vehicles.

It would be way too simple if the tires were the limiting factor. That would mean if any manufacturer wanted a higher load rating all they would have to do is put bigger tires on. If if were only that simple.
__________________
Gordon and Janet
Tour 42QD/inTech Stacker
Gordon Dewald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 10:27 PM   #23
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Florida Keys as often as we can
Posts: 30
"Back to Top
Q.. Are recreational vehicles subject to Interstate axle weight limits?
Yes."

That bit would refer to the federal bridge formula which is (in general) 16000# per axle and not applicable to a small rig like the OP, and doesn't mean you need to stop at scales.

I agree with most everyone else here and get a loaded weight (with full tanks, gear and your buddies in the truck to be accurate) for each axle and make sure you are well within the weight rating of the tires for each axle. I say "well within" and not right on the edge of rated capacity, as that is asking for trouble.

I'd also suggest a set of air bags for the rear axle with separate fill valves. With that much weight that high up, your center of gravity is less than optimum and coupled with the trailer tongue weight could get you into handling issues if you have to make a panic move or a crosswind. I understand that you say it is not too sagged out, but the appearance of a fairly level ride height can be deceiving as that overloaded situation isn't too bad sitting still or going straight and level, it will be magnified in a situation where you get into curves or a crosswind, or porpoising from road conditions. A good set of separate properly inflated air bags will minimize that chance, along with a good sway bar on the trailer.
__________________
dduerden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 11:19 PM   #24
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 76
While this post is for a trailer, the real problem is with motorhomes. I am pretty sure that many are exceeding their GVWR, especially if they are towing. Most never weigh theirs and are ignorant to the fact that they are overweight. Most rely on the manufacturers brooches and guess at the weight they are adding. But most of the Motorhomes need to have their storage spaces mostly bare to be under the GVWR.

Then there is the trick of listing the "unloaded weight" before the options like an awning, tv, refrigerator, microwave, etc. That make the cargo capacity zilch when a driver and passenger are added. A few years ago I was at a shop where the RV owner was seeking to sue the dealer/manufacture because he could not get the rig down to the advertised empty weight, after he removed all the fluids and all of the options. They had the unit on scales and all the options had been removed.

What I am curious about and why I wrote this response, is if anybody has ever heard of some one being sued for negligence because the motor home was over weight? It seems to me that would be hard to prove after the fact unless it was a few thousand pounds over weight. But even if it could be proven would not the manufactures share some blame. I know they constantly warn people not to exceed GVWR, but I also know that manufactures know that many people do.
__________________
pokgunner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2015, 09:45 AM   #25
Senior Member
 
Gordon Dewald's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 10,174
I dont know personally of anyone who has been sued but all you have to do is search for RV lawyers and there are pages of them advertising on the internet.

We seem to assume that no one is aware (other than discussions on the forum) that folks go out with overloaded or poorly set up or maintained rigs. IMO we are foolish if we think that lawyers are not aware of the situation and many are making a good living recovering damages from those situations.
__________________
Gordon and Janet
Tour 42QD/inTech Stacker
Gordon Dewald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2015, 01:48 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
justafordguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 399
In my state if you are registered at or more than your actual weight and stay within the tire weight limits you are 100% legal as far as weight goes.

Also, if you cause an accident for whatever reason, (speed, not paying attention, equipment failure) it's your fault no matter what you are driving and that is what insurance is for.
__________________
2015 Gateway 3650BH
2005 F250 CC 4x4
justafordguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2015, 01:59 PM   #27
Senior Member
 
justafordguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 399
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon Dewald View Post
It would be way too simple if the tires were the limiting factor. That would mean if any manufacturer wanted a higher load rating all they would have to do is put bigger tires on. If if were only that simple.
It is that simple but they don't do it because if they did they would have to cover warranty repairs for trucks that broke because they were overloaded beyond what the rest of the truck could handle.
__________________
2015 Gateway 3650BH
2005 F250 CC 4x4
justafordguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2015, 05:48 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 2,215
There's 1000's of people towing over weight every year. If DOT person or a LEO wanted to issue a ticket all they'd have to do is hangout near the exit of any campground or RV park. Sorta like hanging out near a bar at closing time.
As far as getting sued, well that can happen even if you're under weight. Failure to maintain control of the vehicle and causing an accident can happen anytime.
JMO but on my 3/4 ton I go buy my RAWR and GCVWR. The tow rating is limited by gears. The GVW is limited by the fact that it's a 3/4 ton and needs to fall into the 10,000 and under category for registration purposes.
__________________

__________________
Cumminsfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
GVWR and axle capacity cb1000rider Toy Haulers Discussion 7 05-30-2015 08:33 PM
TT axle and tires below GVWR, is this a problem? Normal? The Tiger Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion 12 04-07-2015 02:28 PM
Travel Trailer GVWR and axle rating don't leave much margin, is this normal? The Tiger Travel Trailer Discussion 4 03-23-2015 11:32 PM
Why the difference in GVWR on 2006 chevy 3500 gas vs Duramax gottular1249 Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion 7 05-28-2014 09:11 PM
Gvwr gas class A--compare 20500 vs 24000 tvolk Class A Motorhome Discussions 5 01-26-2014 02:47 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:29 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.