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Old 04-20-2012, 06:48 PM   #1
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Picking a TV

We decided when we started looking at trailers we decided we would find the trailer we liked, and then pick the Tow Vehicle to go along with it. We would rather not be held back by a low tow rating this time around.

From what I think I understand we should take the GVWR of the TT and the GVWR of the TV and that needs to be less than the GCVW?

Maybe I am a little off, if that is the case some direction would be appreciated. As well as Vehicle Suggestions. Looking for something probably around 6 years old, with as much as we Tow 3 -5 times a year and the majority if not all of those trips are to the same campground within 100 miles round trip.

TT: 2012 Jayco JayFlight Swift 267bh
GVWR: 7500 - don't expect to have more than 500 - 700 lbs worth of stuff with us. We never travel with the water tanks filled.
Axle weight ratings are 3500/3500 for front and rear
not sure of the tongue weight.

If you need any more info please don't hesitate to ask. We would prefer Ford (haven't had good luck with chevy in the past), but are open to other options. Prefer gasoline, but possibly open to diesel (never owned one before)

edit:// I should also note I am looking for either Regular cab or extended cab short box if possible with either model.
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Old 04-21-2012, 08:43 AM   #2
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Here is a link to "Trailer Life Towing Guide". http://www.trailerlife.com/trailer-towing-guides/
Pick a year that you are interested in for a tow vehicle and then review the information on that vehicle. Keep in mind newer the vehicle is the higher the tow ratings will be for that said model. The main reason is the design improvements to the tow vehicles that have been made in the last years.
The 2012 towing guide also explains what you should look for in a towing vehicle and also what the max tow ratings are for each vehicle.
Jim w.
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Old 04-21-2012, 09:29 AM   #3
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Depending on your area, you may have a problem finding a Ford gas engine in a Superduty model. They tend to be more available the farther north you go. In older Fords, the gas engines were the 5.4L V8 and the 6.8L V10. I would suggest that you find a V10 if you want to stay with the gas engine, and get the 3-valve model rather than the 2 valve. You will be a lot happier with the V10 over the V8 for towing, but both use a lot of fuel.
If you happen to opt for a diesel, try for the 6.0L in '06/'07 models--older ones tended to have more problems.
Or you could spend more money and get the new F150 with EcoBoost engine and 11000 tow rating...
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Old 04-21-2012, 05:52 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tracert View Post
From what I think I understand we should take the GVWR of the TT and the GVWR of the TV and that needs to be less than the GCVW?
Good summary. If you load the tow vehicle to the max, and load the RV to the max (without overloading either one), then the gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of the tow vehicle needs to be the total of the two GVWRs or more.

Quote:
As well as Vehicle Suggestions. Looking for something probably around 6 years old, ...
2006. I don't know anything about Dogs and Government Motors, so I'll stick to Ford.

That RV has a dry hitch weight of about 13.2% of unloaded trailer weight, so I would expect that percentage to continue as you load it up. So if you load it to the GVWR, then you'll have 990 pounds hitch weight.

So you need a tow vehicle with enough GVWR to add 990 pounds of hitch weight to the wet and loaded vehicle without exceeding the GVWR of the tow vehicle. And that tow vehicle needs enough GCWR to be able to tow a 7,500 pound trailer without exceeding the GCWR of the tow vehicle.

Example 1: 2006 F-150, 5.4L 3V engine, 3.73 axle ratio, 4x4 , heavy duty payload option, either regular cab with 8' bed or SuperCab with 6.5' bed.

GCWR = 15,000
GVWR = 8,200

Typical truck will weigh about 6,000 pounds before you add passengers and other payload. So that's enough truck for your 7,500 pound trailer with 1,000 pounds hitch weight if you don't haul a bunch of passengers, or stuff in the bed.

But pay attention! If it doesn't have 7-lug 17" wheels, then it doesn't have the heavy duty payload pkg, which is required if you don't want to be overloaded.

GVWRs of truck and trailer is 700 pounds more than the GCWR of the truck. I wouldn't worry about that unless you plan to do a lot of towing in mountains. If you do plana lot of towing in mountains, then go for the F-250.

Example 2. 2006 F-250 SuperDuty diesel, 3.73 axle ratio, 4x4, either regular cab 8' bed or SuperCab 6.5' bed. (No such thing as a SuperDuty regular cab shorty.)

GVWR 9,600 RC, 9,800 SC
GCWR 23,000

Ignore the GCWR of the F-250 diesel. The GVWR will be your limiter. But you won't get within 1,000 pounds of the GVWR with only 1,000 pounds of hitch weight unless your sweetheart goes crazy with loading pretty rocks in the bed.

The GCWR is thousands of pounds greater than the combined GVWRs of truck and trailer. No problem with the worst mountain pass in the USA with a 7,500 pound TT.

Example 3. Much more rare, but the V-10 engine in a 2006 SuperDuty will be more than enough truck for your TT. But expect 12 to 14 MPG with a diesel and maybe 10 MPG with the V-10.

Quote:
...with as much as we Tow 3 -5 times a year and the majority if not all of those trips are to the same campground within 100 miles round trip.
If you get in an accident and hurt or kill someone while overloaded, it doesn't matter if you are one block from home or 2,500 miles from home. The lawyers will make certain your never have any money to buy things such as RVs and tow vehicles again. So don't take the chance of towing overloaded.
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Old 04-22-2012, 06:00 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tracert View Post
TT: 2012 Jayco JayFlight Swift 267bh
GVWR: 7500 - don't expect to have more than 500 - 700 lbs worth of stuff with us. We never travel with the water tanks filled.
Axle weight ratings are 3500/3500 for front and rear
not sure of the tongue weight.
I noticed you said your trailer GVWR is 7500 lbs, but I noticed you said your axles are only rated for 3500 lbs each for a total of only 7000 lbs possible for the GVWR.

Did I get that right? Did they sell you a trailer with undersized axles?
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Old 04-22-2012, 06:49 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by FishaPalooza View Post
I noticed you said your trailer GVWR is 7500 lbs, but I noticed you said your axles are only rated for 3500 lbs each for a total of only 7000 lbs possible for the GVWR.

Did I get that right? Did they sell you a trailer with undersized axles?


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Old 04-22-2012, 07:06 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FishaPalooza View Post
I noticed you said your trailer GVWR is 7500 lbs, but I noticed you said your axles are only rated for 3500 lbs each for a total of only 7000 lbs possible for the GVWR.

Did I get that right? Did they sell you a trailer with undersized axles?
You're not accounting for the tongue weight. At 7500 lbs GVWR, if the trailer were fully loaded, ~12% of that weight would be carried by the tongue and transferred to the tow vehicle as hitch weight. Therefore, 7500 lbs - 900 lbs (12% of 7500 lbs) = 6600 lbs carried by the axles.

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Old 04-22-2012, 07:26 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wingnut60
Depending on your area, you may have a problem finding a Ford gas engine in a Superduty model. They tend to be more available the farther north you go. In older Fords, the gas engines were the 5.4L V8 and the 6.8L V10. I would suggest that you find a V10 if you want to stay with the gas engine, and get the 3-valve model rather than the 2 valve. You will be a lot happier with the V10 over the V8 for towing, but both use a lot of fuel.
If you happen to opt for a diesel, try for the 6.0L in '06/'07 models--older ones tended to have more problems.
Or you could spend more money and get the new F150 with EcoBoost engine and 11000 tow rating...
Joe
I would not buy a ford with 6.0 they had alot of problems the older fords with the 7.3 are way more reliable
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Old 04-22-2012, 07:28 AM   #9
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What Rusty said. The actual GVWR of the trailer should be several hundred pounds more than the combined GAWR because hitch weight is not weight on the trailer axles. However, you will find some trailers where the GVWR is rated the same as the combined GAWR.
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Old 04-22-2012, 07:48 AM   #10
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I would not buy a ford with 6.0 they had alot of problems the older fords with the 7.3 are way more reliable
The first 6.0L diesels of 2003 and 2004 were trouble prone. Ford fixed those under warranty, and that cost Ford so much money that they began the process of severing their relationship with the engine manufacturer, Navistar. But by the 2006 model, Navistar and Ford had pretty much fixed the trouble spots.

The last 7.3L was produced in 2002 and put in an early 2003 SuperDuty. So if you're wanting a 7.3L in a SuperDuty pickup, you'll be looking at trucks that are 10 to 15 years old. The engine in a 10 to 15 years old truck may still be reliable, but the rest of the truck is getting long in the tooth. Plus the 4R100 tranny behind the 7.3L was the weak point in the drivetrain and was not reliable unless you spent more than $4,000 to have BTS rebuild it to make it reliable.

The 6.0Ls have a much better 5R110 automagic tranny with tow-haul mode that is much more reliable than the 4R100 it replaced.

So I would not hesitate to buy a 2006 SuperDuty diesel, provided it checked out. But that puppy is over 6 years old too, so don't expect it to be a new truck.
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Old 04-22-2012, 08:33 AM   #11
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The first 6.0L diesels of 2003 and 2004 were trouble prone. Ford fixed those under warranty, and that cost Ford so much money that they began the process of severing their relationship with the engine manufacturer, Navistar. But by the 2006 model, Navistar and Ford had pretty much fixed the trouble spots.

The last 7.3L was produced in 2002 and put in an early 2003 SuperDuty. So if you're wanting a 7.3L in a SuperDuty pickup, you'll be looking at trucks that are 10 to 15 years old. The engine in a 10 to 15 years old truck may still be reliable, but the rest of the truck is getting long in the tooth. Plus the 4R100 tranny behind the 7.3L was the weak point in the drivetrain and was not reliable unless you spent more than $4,000 to have BTS rebuild it to make it reliable.

The 6.0Ls have a much better 5R110 automagic tranny with tow-haul mode that is much more reliable than the 4R100 it replaced.

So I would not hesitate to buy a 2006 SuperDuty diesel, provided it checked out. But that puppy is over 6 years old too, so don't expect it to be a new truck.
Thank you for the insight, I've experienced all to well the troubles of the 4R100 my uncle had one.

I am still young enough only 28 so I don't have much experience with anything really new either. We upgraded to this TT from a 1983 YellowStone Camino. Obviously a HUGE upgrade.

I had heard of the badness of the 03/04 models. Chances are when I buy it will be 05 - 07. I have had terrible luck with anything Chevy, I loved my ranger, and wife has had a tempo, windstar, and a newer focus. Dodge we don't have alot of experience with other than my parents 2010 Ram 1500 that they bought brand new. (very nice truck tho)

I am not a fan of "huge trucks" manly because we deal with alot of traffic over here sometimes, where it was hard enough getting around in the Windstar.

Thank you for your previous insight as well, just going to take my time, and do my research and make sure I get something I will be happy with, and can tow with safely. Funny thing is this trailer was marked as "easily half ton towable" Need to remember to always do my research but, happy wife , happy life was more important than it being towed by a half ton truck lol
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Old 04-22-2012, 08:34 AM   #12
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You're not accounting for the tongue weight. At 7500 lbs GVWR, if the trailer were fully loaded, ~12% of that weight would be carried by the tongue and transferred to the tow vehicle as hitch weight. Therefore, 7500 lbs - 900 lbs (12% of 7500 lbs) = 6600 lbs carried by the axles.

Rusty
Thank you for that lol, I was ready to load her up, and head for Indiana
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Old 04-23-2012, 03:49 AM   #13
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Copy that! I thought I might be missing something but wasn't sure.
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Old 05-18-2012, 04:15 PM   #14
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My '04 6.0 is an absolute workhorse now, after I had the head bolts replaced and the EGR fixed the right way! If you consider one, make sure it has this work done, or factor in enough ($4000ish) to make the deal worthwhile.
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