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Old 02-21-2014, 05:49 AM   #29
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The advertised GVRW is 10,300, not that it makes that much difference.
The Blackstone website says "max trailer weight" =10,160. They don't mention GVWR specifically, but GVWR is normally defined as the max trailer weight.

However, they also show the dry trailer weight as 8,250 plus the net carrying capacity (NCC) of 2,050 = 10,300. Usually when the specs don't include GVWR, you use dry weight plus NCC to determine GVWR.

Quote:
I am far from being good in math but I went over my figures again and came up with the same numbers...Step 4, using my figures puts the trailer at 10,040 lbs,...
.

1,940 hitch weight for a TT that weighs 10,040 is over 19% hitch weight. "Normal" is 12.5% to 15%. So your trailer is loaded heavier than normal in the front part of the trailer. There's nothing particularly wrong with 19% hitch weight if your TV has the weight capacity to handle that much hitch weight without exceeding the GVWR of the TV, and provided your receiver and WD hitch are rated for over 1,940 pounds of hitch weight.

Quote:
The axels are rated at 5200 lbs.
So the combined GAWR is 10,400 pounds, which is slightly less than the GVWR. Most RV manufacturers rate the GVWR at a few percent more than the combined GAWR, because hitch weight of a TT is a minimum of 10% of gross trailer weight. And hitch weight is on the tow vehicle axles, not on the trailer axles. Your trailer axles could support a GVWR of up to 11,440 pounds. So something besides the trailer axles is limiting the GVWR of your trailer. If I had to guess, I'd guess it probably frame strength.

Quote:
The 15% tongue weight of 1,524 lbs is 24 lbs over the max receiver weight of 1,500 lbs, not to mention the max 1,400 lb bars.
So your actual tongue weight of 1,940 pounds far exceeds the weight limits of both the receiver and the WD hitch. I don't know the fix, but I would not want to tow that trailer on an RV trip until I could get the tongue weight numbers to less than the limits of receiver, hitch and tow vehicle.
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Old 02-21-2014, 11:36 PM   #30
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Today I removed everything from the front pass thru storage and weighed them. The total was 320 lbs, add another 100 lbs for the propane & batteries, = 420 lbs, add that to the dry weight of 1080 lbs = 1,500 lbs, the max for the hitch receiver. Buy the time we throw in our clothes, bedding and such I doubt I will be able to put much in the front pass thru. I will weigh everything I put in the trailer, then take it to the scales to get the actual weights. Not that it is funny, but that 420 lbs was in our prior 28' TT, most of it was in a front pass thru, the rest was stored in two smaller outside access compartments. Should have seen this with the high tongue weight, no one to blame but me. Thanks to all who have posted & provided information.
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Old 02-27-2014, 08:36 PM   #31
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I have found a receiver hitch rated at 2,500 lbs, and a WD rated at 1,700 lbs, (still looking for a WD with higher weight rating. Before I spend the $$ to replace the receiver and WD is there a way I can determine if my F 250 will handle the tongue weight of over 1,900 lbs?
Front GAWR is 4800 lbs
Rear GAWR is 6,084 lbs.
When I weighed the wet & loaded combo the figures were
Steer axle 4,000 lbs
drive axle 5,940 lbs
Trailer axle 8,180 lbs.
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Old 02-28-2014, 10:53 AM   #32
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I have found a receiver hitch rated at 2,500 lbs, and a WD rated at 1,700 lbs, (still looking for a WD with higher weight rating.
Check out the Blue Ox SwayPro model BXW2000. Max tongue weight of 2,000 pounds. SwayPro By Blue Ox

One source is Blue Ox BXW2000 SwayPro Hitch 2000 LB | American RV Company

Another source for Blue Ox hitches is www.pplmotorhomes.com, where the lowest prices are usually available. But right now they don't have the BXW2000 listed on their website. Maybe call them to check the price for a special order?

Quote:
Before I spend the $$ to replace the receiver and WD is there a way I can determine if my F 250 will handle the tongue weight of over 1,900 lbs?
Depends on your definition of "handle". My definition is to not exceed the GVWR of the F-250. You stated your truck axle weights are 4,000 plus 5,940 = 9,940 GVW.

Assuming your F-250 is a 2005-up, your GVWR is 10,000,

--- so if you don't add more tongue weight to your trailer,

---and you don't load the pickup with more weight such as people, pets, tools, whatever,

--- and you install the receiver and Blue Ox hitch parts noted above,

then your truck should "handle" up to 2,000 pounds hitch weight with no problem.
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Old 02-28-2014, 08:12 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokeyWren View Post
Check out the Blue Ox SwayPro model BXW2000. Max tongue weight of 2,000 pounds. SwayPro By Blue Ox

One source is Blue Ox BXW2000 SwayPro Hitch 2000 LB | American RV Company

Another source for Blue Ox hitches is Used RVs, Motorhomes for Sale, and Consigned sales - PPL Motor Homes, where the lowest prices are usually available. But right now they don't have the BXW2000 listed on their website. Maybe call them to check the price for a special order?



Depends on your definition of "handle". My definition is to not exceed the GVWR of the F-250. You stated your truck axle weights are 4,000 plus 5,940 = 9,940 GVW.

Your GVWR is 10,000,

--- so if you don't add more tongue weight to your trailer,

---and you don't load the pickup with more weight such as people, pets, tools, whatever,

--- and you install the receiver and Blue Ox hitch parts noted above,

then your truck should "handle" up to 2,000 pounds hitch weight with no problem.
My definition is the same, that is why I am asking all these questions. So I understand this correctly. The sticker on the cab reads the Front GAWR is 4800 lbs & the Rear GAWR is 6,084 lbs =10,884 lbs so wouldn't that be the GVWR? When I weighed the combination the WD hitch was not set up correctly and it was way tongue heavy. The ball height is now correct, but the bars are too light, even empty the rear of the truck sags and the front of the trailer sags, so I have more then one thing I am trying to figure out. If I can get the hitch set correctly and the TV and trailer correct, I will know I can tow the trailer safely (unloaded for now). I understand what you are saying & I agree with you, I am not going to tow unsafe nor at the max of my equipment. I can not tow this trailer with the 1,500 lb receiver I just put on, so I have to buy a higher rated receiver.

Thanks for your input here, please excuse my lack of knowledge, I really do appreciate your expertise and advise here.
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Old 03-01-2014, 09:35 AM   #34
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The sticker on the cab reads the Front GAWR is 4800 lbs & the Rear GAWR is 6,084 lbs =10,884 lbs so wouldn't that be the GVWR?
No. GAWRs are not additive. You could have a heavy grill guard on the front that would cause the front axle to have max GAW. Or you could have a heavy trailer that maxes out the rear GAW. That's okay as long as you don't exceed the GVWR. (The GVWR is on the same sticker as the GAWRs.)

A big factor when the engineers compute GVWR is braking power. So even though the combined weight rating of your axles could support more weight than the GVWR, maybe you wouldn't have enough braking power to safely stop the truck when overloaded over the GVWR.

My 1999.5 F-250 had GVWR of 8,800 pounds. The combined GAWR was 10,934 (4,850 + 6,084). So my GVWR was a lot less than the combined GAWR. That provides flexibility to load the truck heavy in either the front or rear without exceeding the GAWR, but I still had to live with that miniscule GVWR. (I was usually overloaded by a coupla hundred pounds over the GVWR when dragging my 8,000-pound 5er.)

Hmmmmmm. If your rear GAWR is 6,084 pounds, then you probably don't have a 10,000 pounds GVWR of the 2005-up F-250. Is your GVWR only 8,800 pounds?
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Old 03-01-2014, 02:07 PM   #35
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No. GAWRs are not additive. You could have a heavy grill guard on the front that would cause the front axle to have max GAW. Or you could have a heavy trailer that maxes out the rear GAW. That's okay as long as you don't exceed the GVWR. (The GVWR is on the same sticker as the GAWRs.)

A big factor when the engineers compute GVWR is braking power. So even though the combined weight rating of your axles could support more weight than the GVWR, maybe you wouldn't have enough braking power to safely stop the truck when overloaded over the GVWR.

My 1999.5 F-250 had GVWR of 8,800 pounds. The combined GAWR was 10,934 (4,850 + 6,084). So my GVWR was a lot less than the combined GAWR. That provides flexibility to load the truck heavy in either the front or rear without exceeding the GAWR, but I still had to live with that miniscule GVWR. (I was usually overloaded by a coupla hundred pounds over the GVWR when dragging my 8,000-pound 5er.)

Hmmmmmm. If your rear GAWR is 6,084 pounds, then you probably don't have a 10,000 pounds GVWR of the 2005-up F-250. Is your GVWR only 8,800 pounds?
TV is a 2002 and you are correct the GVWR is 8,800 lbs. Again I appreciate your patience in explaining this to me, the combined GAWR of the F-250 when hooked up is 9,940 lbs, meaning the TV is 1,140 lbs over weight? If that is the case it does not matter what receiver or WDH I put on, I am not able to distribute the weight so I can safely tow the TT, correct?
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Old 03-01-2014, 02:57 PM   #36
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TV is a 2002 and you are correct the GVWR is 8,800 lbs. ... the combined GAWR of the F-250 when hooked up is 9,940 lbs, meaning the TV is 1,140 lbs over weight?
You mean the combined GAW (= GVW) is 9,940. The max GVWR of the 2002 F-350 SRW was 9,900, so you are overloaded even for an F-350 SWR of that era.

Quote:
If that is the case it does not matter what receiver or WDH I put on, I am not able to distribute the weight so I can safely tow the TT, correct?
No, not exactly. You'll be overloaded over the GVWR of the F-250, but that does not necessarily mean you can't safely tow with that much GVW. On one trip from west Texas to near Lake George, New York, I grossed about 9,650 on the 4 truck tires with that '99.5 F-250 that had 8,800 GVWR. With excellent tires all around and a good Reese 5er hitch with 4-way tilt, plus excellent well-maintained brakes on both TV and trailer, I never felt I was not safe and in complete control of the rig. I held down the speed to 62 MPH, and planned ahead for every exit and stop sign or red light so I never was involved in an emergency situation. I never towed after sundown, so my headlights aiming at the stars did not attract any LEOs. With my years of experience towing heavy trailers, as long as I never grossed more than 9,900 pounds on the 4 truck tires, I wasn't worried about being unsafe. I hauled some of my daughter's inheritance from her deceased mom to Brooklyn, then attended a Ford diesel rally near Lake George. The return trip with a lot less weight in the trailer and GVW closer to 9,000 pounds was more relaxed driving.

Especially when overloaded with a TT, you want the correct receiver and WD hitch, properly set up and adjusted for the actual scaled weight of your trailer. So don't skrimp on those components. But being overloaded over the GVWR of the TV is not a big deal if your tow vehicle is well-maintained and you are a good driver and don't get into an emergency condition.
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Old 03-02-2014, 12:33 AM   #37
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SmokyWren

I am not sure what I am going to do.

Thanks again for your help.
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