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Old 02-01-2014, 08:42 AM   #29
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Special Driving Licence

Possum,

In B.C., towing a recreational trailer over 4,600 kg (10161 lbs.) requires an endorsement to your licence. To get the endorsement a written and practical test is required.
This requirement is set out in the ICBC section on driver's licences at the following link

ICBC | Towing a recreational trailer

If the trailer is not a recreational vehicle such as an enclosed car trailer over 4,600 kg you would require a heavy trailer licence which also requires a driver's medical.

Failure to have the proper endorsement could have profound effects on your insurance coverage in the event of an accident whether in your home province or elsewhere.
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Old 02-01-2014, 01:55 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidz_driver View Post
Possum,

In B.C., towing a recreational trailer over 4,600 kg (10161 lbs.) requires an endorsement to your licence. To get the endorsement a written and practical test is required.
This requirement is set out in the ICBC section on driver's licences at the following link

ICBC | Towing a recreational trailer

If the trailer is not a recreational vehicle such as an enclosed car trailer over 4,600 kg you would require a heavy trailer licence which also requires a driver's medical.

Failure to have the proper endorsement could have profound effects on your insurance coverage in the event of an accident whether in your home province or elsewhere.
I went to the government agents office in Courtenay to ask what was expected of me to tow my trailer. They asked if it was a commercial unit and I said no my portable fishing and hunting lodge and they told me all I need was my class 5.

BTW on the same day I transferred the ownership of the travel trailer I had bought and got the insurance. The insurance agent (ICBC) did not ask anything and just charged me for the insurance and plate. I used it for a few years and then got a class "C" motorhome. It too is now gone and I have a 30 foot class "A"
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Old 02-07-2014, 05:36 AM   #31
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dbear,

If you are legally licensed to drive any vehicle in NYS, you are legal in all the other states. It is a reciprocal agreement between states.
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Nope. Driver's licenses are one of the few things that all states recognize based on your home states rules. Live in X, have X license following their weight rules, you're legal in the other 49.
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IN all 50 states plus a couple of possessions and selected Canadian Provences (Not sure about all of those or Mexico)

If you are PROPERLY LICENSED for the vehicle you are operating at home, You are Properly Licensed period.. All the states and so on respect the home state license.. As the home state does theirs.

However, if your home state has a rule "Any vehicle over 26000 pounds needs a CDL" for example. and your rig tips the scales at 26001.. You may have a problem epically in red-lined areas (AAA map underlines some places in red, AVOID those)

Nice to believe all the above but it may NOT be the case. I'm legally licensed in Michigan to pull a trailer behind my 5th wheel. (special license) Apparently that license is NOT recognized in several states. Or so I'm told.
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Old 02-07-2014, 07:55 AM   #32
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Nice to believe all the above but it may NOT be the case. I'm legally licensed in Michigan to pull a trailer behind my 5th wheel. (special license) Apparently that license is NOT recognized in several states. Or so I'm told.
floridasnow
Yeah, pretty much everywhere on the east coast double towing is not allowed, but that's a separate issue and not license dependent, except for maybe semi's pulling multiple trailers on the interstates. Although, that does bring up the point that if you have a Class A with proper endorsements and can legally pull tandem 53' trailers behind a Class 8 truck, why shouldn't you be able to pull your 5er & boat(?) together behind a properly spec'd, rated and capable tow vehicle?

Towing World Official Website
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Old 02-07-2014, 05:25 PM   #33
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I may not have been clear - my bad. If you are legally licensed to drive a vehicle in your home state your are licensed in the other states by reciprocal agreement. That does not include the "Rules of the Road" for the states you travel through. You have to follow the rules and restrictions of the state. Example: In my state I may drive a 45 foot MH anywhere, but if I go to California I can only drive it on the highways designated for the length and follow any restrictions for that length. So in your state you are allow a double tow, but in another state there is a restriction on double towing. You have to follow the rules and restrictions. For a 45 footer weighing 45,000 pounds you may only need a simple drivers license in your state. That license is good for all other states and it doesn't matter if that state requires a special license or not.

Here is a link to State Towing Laws

Will you get stopped? Depends on the patrolman sitting on the side of the road and what type day he has had.

In Florida it is against the law to triple tow.
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Old 02-07-2014, 06:53 PM   #34
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I may not have been clear - my bad. If you are legally licensed to drive a vehicle in your home state your are licensed in the other states by reciprocal agreement. That does not include the "Rules of the Road" for the states you travel through. You have to follow the rules and restrictions of the state. Example: In my state I may drive a 45 foot MH anywhere, but if I go to California I can only drive it on the highways designated for the length and follow any restrictions for that length. So in your state you are allow a double tow, but in another state there is a restriction on double towing. You have to follow the rules and restrictions. For a 45 footer weighing 45,000 pounds you may only need a simple drivers license in your state. That license is good for all other states and it doesn't matter if that state requires a special license or not.

Here is a link to State Towing Laws

Will you get stopped? Depends on the patrolman sitting on the side of the road and what type day he has had.

In Florida it is against the law to triple tow.
I probably wasn't clear either with my last semi-rhetorical "question". It was really more of a statement about the inconsistencies in the states' reciprocal agreements. Sometimes I think maybe it would be a good idea if there was a universal set of rules that applied to every state, but then I think about how scary that might be, especially if NY had any say in it.
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Old 02-07-2014, 06:53 PM   #35
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Yeah, pretty much everywhere on the east coast double towing is not allowed, but that's a separate issue and not license dependent, except for maybe semi's pulling multiple trailers on the interstates. Although, that does bring up the point that if you have a Class A with proper endorsements and can legally pull tandem 53' trailers behind a Class 8 truck, why shouldn't you be able to pull your 5er & boat(?) together behind a properly spec'd, rated and capable tow vehicle?

Towing World Official Website
That's only because you have not crossed the states palm with enough prerequisite silver. At one time I had the proper license in Ontario to haul double trailers behind my semi but that still did not allow me to pull my boat behind my travel trailer. That required two trips to the camp ground.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne M View Post
I may not have been clear - my bad. If you are legally licensed to drive a vehicle in your home state your are licensed in the other states by reciprocal agreement. That does not include the "Rules of the Road" for the states you travel through. You have to follow the rules and restrictions of the state. Example: In my state I may drive a 45 foot MH anywhere, but if I go to California I can only drive it on the highways designated for the length and follow any restrictions for that length. So in your state you are allow a double tow, but in another state there is a restriction on double towing. You have to follow the rules and restrictions. For a 45 footer weighing 45,000 pounds you may only need a simple drivers license in your state. That license is good for all other states and it doesn't matter if that state requires a special license or not.

Here is a link to State Towing Laws

Will you get stopped? Depends on the patrolman sitting on the side of the road and what type day he has had.

In Florida it is against the law to triple tow.
Hmmm You go to CA. I stay away and my nephew is a state trooper there. He advised the family against it because of the ticket quota system they don't enforce.
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Old 02-10-2014, 11:01 PM   #36
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In Florida it is against the law to triple tow.[/QUOTE]

Actually it is only legal to triple tow in a few states.
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Old 02-11-2014, 07:51 AM   #37
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Pulling multiple trailers does vary from state to state, Most only allow it for SEMIs and then not all Semi's and not in all places. Michigan, for example, allows a gravel hauler to be "Double Bottom" (Two trailers) but not a Gasoline tanker,, Except in some places where the Gravel hauler has to drop his 2nd trailer and come back for it later. And I think they allow TRIPPLE trailers in some cases (I'm thinking UPS).

As for your license: If you are legal on the street where the address your vehicle and license are both registered to.. you are legal anywhere in the US, and a good part of Canada.. (I do not know about all of Canada or Mexico)
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Old 02-11-2014, 11:06 AM   #38
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When I worked in the steel industry in Ontario CA Transport would haul huge loads on "B" trains from Sault Ste Marie to Detroit along I-75 almost daily.
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Old 02-11-2014, 11:28 AM   #39
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States cannot restrict what the feds allow on the Interstate system. That's why you'll see double and tipples on the Interstates and yards right ourside the exits where drivers have to drop their excess boxes. Different rules for what you can drive over a state's roads and what license is permitted to be used to haul it. That's one of the reasons why they went to a CDL for the commercial guys. Uniform rules and testing. The states are starting to head that way with some of their non-CDL licenses, but they haven't got their act together yet and I don't think they will as the feds can regulate interstate commerce, so they can specify licenses, but the feds can't just regulate all licenses as it usurps states' rights. I'll be long dead before that one settles out, but I have a CDL anyway, so it doesn't matter to me. No dog in THAT fight, and it WILL be a big fight.
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Old 02-12-2014, 07:29 AM   #40
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States cannot restrict what the feds allow on the Interstate system. That's why you'll see double and tipples on the Interstates and yards right ourside the exits where drivers have to drop their excess boxes. Different rules for what you can drive over a state's roads and what license is permitted to be used to haul it. That's one of the reasons why they went to a CDL for the commercial guys. Uniform rules and testing. The states are starting to head that way with some of their non-CDL licenses, but they haven't got their act together yet and I don't think they will as the feds can regulate interstate commerce, so they can specify licenses, but the feds can't just regulate all licenses as it usurps states' rights. I'll be long dead before that one settles out, but I have a CDL anyway, so it doesn't matter to me. No dog in THAT fight, and it WILL be a big fight.
Are you saying that triple towing is legal on interstates in all states?

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Old 02-12-2014, 08:16 AM   #41
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Since I don't triple tow I've never looked into it, and I just don't know. What I do know is that Interstate rules can be and are different than those on state and local roads. Whether the Interstate rules are uniform throughout the US or even throughout an individual state would be a good thing to explore if you're interested. Of course where the rules say you can triple tow on the Interstate but if you get off you need to drop the last trailer within a short distance of the exit, probably wouldn't help you much unless you are just traveling through.

I also know that rules for state routes vary depending on the state. Here in Delaware I have different requirements for escorts and lighting when I'm moving large farm equipment (harvesters, combines, heads, etc) on state routes or marked Federal highways. Lots of quirks in these laws, and these are all over the board.

Seems like we have answered the OP's question regarding pulling legally in his state and others under general provisions of the states' reciprocal license provisions. Once you get beyond that, things can get real sticky real fast. As someone who has trained State, County and Local LEO's, it was my observation that very few of them know or are current on their own locales differences, especially in regard to oversize and outsize vs a guy pulling an RV. Many times you'll get different answers if you talk to regular patrol folks or truck enforcement guys and gals. Not their fault, just outside their world.
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Old 02-12-2014, 08:21 AM   #42
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Since I don't triple tow I've never looked into it, and I just don't know. What I do know is that Interstate rules can be and are different than those on state and local roads. Whether the Interstate rules are uniform throughout the US or even throughout an individual state would be a good thing to explore if you're interested. Of course where the rules say you can triple tow on the Interstate but if you get off you need to drop the last trailer within a short distance of the exit, probably wouldn't help you much unless you are just traveling through.

I also know that rules for state routes vary depending on the state. Here in Delaware I have different requirements for escorts and lighting when I'm moving large farm equipment (harvesters, combines, heads, etc) on state routes or marked Federal highways. Lots of quirks in these laws, and these are all over the board.

.
Thanks. I do believe that states CAN legislate restrictions on what can take place on interstates within their boarders. You won't see triple towing on California interstates.

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