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Old 07-29-2011, 08:40 AM   #1
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Tires on my TV..........

Good morning All:

I was just reading a thread about cracks in Michelin tires. My question is, other than wearing your tires out, or replacing tires due to cracks, what is the average life span of tires on your TV? The reason I'm asking, is that I have 32000 miles on my Michelin tires, but they are 4 years old. So do I change them as I would on the 5er, if those tires were 4 to 6 years old?
Thanks
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Old 07-29-2011, 09:04 AM   #2
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What type of TV is it?
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Old 07-29-2011, 09:09 AM   #3
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Hello "dogpatch:

It's the vehicle in my sig. a 2004 GMC 2500HD..........
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Old 07-30-2011, 12:59 PM   #4
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A same exact tire on a trailer and truck operate in a completly different inviroment. Apples vs oranges.
The tires on the trailer may sit for months with close to max loads/slides sideways around cornors/endure constant weight changes rolling down the road in strong sidewinds or around curves/etc.

The same tire on a truck may be driven dailey with little weight on them while the front set steer around the cornor and the rear set follows.

I ran the OEM Michelin LT265/70-17 E LTX AS for 115k miles in 7 years on a 2500 Dodge/Cummins. I generally run tires on a vehicle down to the tread wear indicators or maybe a bit sooner if winter in comming on.
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Old 07-30-2011, 01:44 PM   #5
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Like any oher automobile tire you can pay attention to tread wear---your tires get plenty of exercise which is what they need to distinguish them from RV tires----due diligence is too watch for any anomolies as you would any tire and ----motor on.

I assume that with such a beautiful car you also carry the appropriate air pressure etc;

For the record my RV Michelins are 1002 DOT and have preformed flawlessly---no cracks---I am replacing them just short of the (Michelin) stated life of the tire 10 years.
There are skeptics to this but I can only recount the experience I am having with my Michelins---which has been eveything I could have ask for from a tire.
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Old 07-30-2011, 02:15 PM   #6
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My understanding is that 7 years is the limit (if not worn below tread wear indicators BEFORE).

Below was a post based on what little I know about tire rot (not trying to sound like a "know-it-all-ski" this is just what I've heard, read, been told over the years. I am sure there are solid SMEs (Subject Matter Experts) posting on this subject as some of these guys obviously have a ton of experience. Below was my response to another poster recently:

GoReds2,
There has been a great deal of talk in recent years regarding the serviceability of tires; the dry-rot versus tire wear conundrum. I have read that all tire manufactures seem to have an opinion regarding just how long a tire is safely kept in service, but only know of Michelin giving a firm date: seven years. Goodyear – like others -discusses service life but does not pin down a life-span like Michelin – at least from what I’ve read on the subject. So in my mind, seven years is my limit.
DOT mandates that the date of manufacture be molded on to each tire, the code is year then week made within that year.
The evil effect of parking on concrete long-term is to me a relatively newer discussion, but it makes sense I suppose given what’s in concrete. The earlier post about using old mud flaps seems like a good idea. Specifically made plastic block “kits” are available at RV stores like Camping World and can not only be used to better distribute the weight of your vehicle to avoid that occasional sinking feeling RVers can experience but also they interlock and can be stacked to help level your ride.
In Porsche’s club magazine, there is always an ad for “tire cradles” that distribute the vehicles weight around a greater portion of the tire’s circumference though I’ve never seen a product like that offered for heavier RV use. But that seems a little anal retentive, doesn’t it? By the way, if you are a Skyline Chili eating Reds Fan (given your call sign) and living in the Cinci area, P2O (Porsches to Oxford) is THIS weekend in, you guessed it, Oxgord, OH.
Me, under the KISS* principle – a principle that has served me so well – I have a couple of 2x10s with a bevel cut on one end on which to plant the load; especially while boon docking in primative Wildlife Management Areas as that’s where the little lady likes to camp to decompress.
You’ve probably also witnessed the use of “skirts” that are hung around RV tires to avoid UV caused damage. I’ve also seen a product in some of the mags for the same purpose that can be applied like paint – I’ve never heard a review on the effectiveness of that stuff, it may be junk, and who knows, cause warts or skin lesions if you get it on you; I don’t know.
Finally, if I could humbly and respectfully offer ANY advice it would be keep close track of your tire pressures – like once a week at the minimum. I’m lucky in that I have an installed air system on our RV that includes a 40’ air whip I can couple in for this purpose. I also have a really loud compressor in my man-cave the neighbors seem to appreciate.
Take care and Go Cubbies.
KISS: Keep It Simple Stupid (That’d be ME).
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Old 07-30-2011, 02:28 PM   #7
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I find the below link instructive, especially the following lines about trailer tire "lifespan":

" Trailer tires are not designed to wear out.
The life of a trailer tire is limited by time and duty cycles.
The mileage expectation of a trailer tire is 5,000 to 12,000 miles."


Link: Trailer Tire Facts - Discount Tire
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Old 07-30-2011, 02:46 PM   #8
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Francesca,

Good call, didn't think about grabbing info from Discount Tire. tire rack may have a simular link.

More importantly, Port Hadlock, huh? Have you ever been to the Chimicum Cafe? (not sure of spelling) If so, do they still feature that great "Marion Berry [sic] Pie" and the best rhuebarb/strawberry pie found in this sector of the galaxy? Sorry, getting hungry.
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Old 07-30-2011, 03:05 PM   #9
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USN, retired, huh?
I'll bet you were stationed at Indian Island or Bangor!
I live about five miles from the Cafe- used to work there, as a matter of fact.
And yes- the pie's still killer.
Hmmm....haven't had any for awhile....
I think I'll run over and get some right now!
Okay, I'm back.
Let me just get the Webcam set up here...
There!
See that Marionberry Pie, still steaming a bit from the oven?
I bought a whole one so there'd be plenty to share...
Let's dig in!

Francesca
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Old 07-30-2011, 03:46 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Francesca View Post
USN, retired, huh?
I'll bet you were stationed at Indian Island or Bangor!
I live about five miles from the Cafe- used to work there, as a matter of fact.
And yes- the pie's still killer.
Hmmm....haven't had any for awhile....
I think I'll run over and get some right now!
Okay, I'm back.
Let me just get the Webcam set up here...
There!
See that Marionberry Pie, still steaming a bit from the oven?
I bought a whole one so there'd be plenty to share...
Let's dig in!

Francesca
Made some interesting dives for the Navy with some guys out of there, but never stationed there. Have a few retired diver pals that still live up there and keep the Naval Undersea Museum working (and hold uncontrolled parties!!!!)...but LOVE the area! (and God as my witness I've never had a bad meal at Salty's on Alkai Bay in West Seattle when I visit tadd Pacific Shipyard)...sheeze, now I'm REALLY hungry.

Have my pie ready? On my way.
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Old 07-30-2011, 06:15 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OleBlue View Post
Good morning All:

The reason I'm asking, is that I have 32000 miles on my Michelin tires, but they are 4 years old. Thanks
Do you mean you have had them for four years or are they four years old? Check the date code, my guess is that when you bought them they were already a few years old...Michelins usually last longer than four years.
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Old 07-31-2011, 08:50 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Francesca View Post
I find the below link instructive, especially the following lines about trailer tire "lifespan":

" Trailer tires are not designed to wear out.
The life of a trailer tire is limited by time and duty cycles.
The mileage expectation of a trailer tire is 5,000 to 12,000 miles."


Link: Trailer Tire Facts - Discount Tire
Wow, Thanks all for your great answers. "OK" here is the other part of my question. First and foremost the Michelin tires that I mentioned have been on my TV for four years. I bought them new, so I do know their history. Basically they have been well maintained. So what I want to do is put these tires (the Michelins) on our 5th wheel (same size tire) Then buy new tires for the TV. This way I only have to buy one set of tires, instead of 8. If it works out to be a good practice, I can always swap the tires from the TV to the 5er. So what does everyone think, good idea or not? Thanks again!
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Old 07-31-2011, 09:36 PM   #13
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Well, you don't say which Michelins you have on your TV-
but I'd be surprised if they are trailer tires (ST's).
From my own experience I can tell you that trailer tires, partly due to their stiffer sidewall construction, give better handling performance on the road.
I don't know that I'd trust my trailer to 4 year old tires that had been switched off a TV...
A blowout can have a very negative effect on the folks up front in the tow vehicle!
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Old 07-31-2011, 09:45 PM   #14
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Great idea however it depends on the size of the tire.

When I pulled for hire I ran either LT235/85-16 E or LT215/85-16 E as they can be ran a narrow 6" trailer wheel with no abnormal wear issues. I ran the tires for 35k-40k on the truck the mounted them on the trailer wheels.

Many of the newer GM trucks use LT265/70-16 E which require a 8" wide wheel so their simply not a good match. Another point is axle and trailer manufactures use and recommend a narrow wheel and tire as a wide tire like the 265 or 285 series has lots of traction as it slides sideways around a cornor. This adds more stress to the tire internal belts/wheels/bearings/U bolts and other suspension parts.
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