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Old 11-04-2014, 08:18 AM   #1
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To Tow or Not to tow, what is the answer?

Hi everyone. We just purchased a Silverback 30WRE fifth wheel with a UVW of 10870lbs and a GVWR of 13,941lbs. We were looking at a 2014 Ford F250 CC gasser with a GVWR of 9900lbs. Here's where it got tricky. We were initally told it had a 4.30 axle ratio which would have put the GCWR at 22,000lbs and the max trailer load at 15,100 - all within limits. We just found out it is actually a 3.73 which drops the numbers to 19,000 and 12,100. The guy who sold the truck to the dealer had a 5th wheel with a GVWR of 14,500lbs and said that he had no issues pulling it (i did see the rig still connected at the site). The dealer said that this truck could easily pull 17,000 and ours would be no issue. He has been very honest up until now. Me and the DW are weekend warriors who will only be putting about 5k - 10k per year on the truck. My question is do i trust the dealer or go with the sticker weights.
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Old 11-04-2014, 10:20 AM   #2
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MOHO - go with the weights stickers. The dealer has one goal - sell the truck. It is not his family that is in jeopardy. He is correct in only one area - an F250 can certainly pull the trailer. No dispute from me. But you also need to safely control that trailer and I'm sure there will be times when you need to stop it. That is when overloading a truck can get dicey. Spend a few $$$ more and get an F350 SRW. You'll get more GVWR and it is not any different than driving an F250.
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Old 11-04-2014, 11:45 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Portert View Post
We just purchased a Silverback 30WRE fifth wheel with a UVW of 10870lbs and a GVWR of 13,941lbs. We were looking at a 2014 Ford F250 CC gasser with a GVWR of 9900lbs.
You'll be severely overloaded over the GVWR of the F-250. Ignore the "tow rating" because you can't get close to the tow rating before you run out of payload capacity for hitch, passenger and cargo weight.

If you load that trailer down to around 13,000 pounds when on the road, your pin weight will 2200 to 2600 pounds. That much pin weight will overload any F-250, and may even be too much for an F-350 SRW 4x4.

Since you already have the trailer, I'd strongly encourage you to buy a dually to tow it with. As a minimum, you need at least an F-350 SRW, then pay close attention to how much weight you load into the pickup and trailer. With a dually, you won't have to worry about overloading the pickup with that trailer.
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Old 11-04-2014, 01:12 PM   #4
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So just i understand correctly, when it says the hitch weight is 1941lbs, that is based on the dry weight?
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Old 11-04-2014, 01:29 PM   #5
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Exactly! The manufacturer has no way to know what you will load into any of their products. The only weight they can publish is dry and a GVWR which is the MAX they designed that product to weigh.
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Old 11-04-2014, 02:38 PM   #6
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Let me guess, the guy who traded it in bought a new F-350 right? That is what you should buy and probably a duelly diesel.
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Old 11-04-2014, 03:07 PM   #7
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Hmmm. I thought about that also. Seeing as it was only one year old. He bought a Sunseeker Class C
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Old 11-04-2014, 03:35 PM   #8
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How much a gas truck can pull has nothing to do with braking capacity. It's mostly determined by the heat/cooling capacity of the power train. Reason why larger capacity with greater rear end ratio. If I would have listened to this site I would have a 27ft 5th wheel RV that I had 20 years ago. Most trailer over 12000lbs here is recommended to be pulled with a duelly. While 3/4 of the similar units are safely towed by SRW trucks.
Personally I would choose a diesel to tow that much trailer. But the feelings for many is to stay with gas due to the late model diesel issues. My truck is a 2005 and no way will I trade for a while. It tows my unit with great comfort. And in addition I can use it for my everyday construction work.
In addition most low mileage gas trucks available used are trade ins by owners that found the gas truck being overworked with heavy trailer. I did tow with an overworked gas truck for 3 years and survived. But a good used diesel surely made the towing a breeze.
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Old 11-04-2014, 05:46 PM   #9
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thank you all for your help. at least I know have a better understanding and a more clear picture on what I am looking for.
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Old 11-04-2014, 07:00 PM   #10
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Wren is wrong, as he always is, when referring to Ford SD trucks. The F250 SRW is IDENTICAL to the F350 SRW with a 2" rear spacer block as opposed to a 4" and an upper overload spring. (If the 250 has the camper package it will already have the overload spring, just not the taller spacer block.) Everything else is 100% the same. The axles, brakes, frame, everything. So, if the 250 is the right price then go for it. It is more than enough truck for the trailer weights you list. If the rear end sags under load you can swap to the 4" blocks (about $125 in parts), add air bags, or both. Whatever you do, don't listen to anyone who tells you that you need a DRW truck for that trailer. The only shortcoming you have is the 6.2. It will do the job, you just won't win any races getting there.
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Old 11-04-2014, 07:50 PM   #11
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Quote:
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The F250 SRW is IDENTICAL to the F350 SRW with a 2" rear spacer block as opposed to a 4" and an upper overload spring.
Ford's specs do not agree with you.

From 2009 Ford Truck Source Book:

F-250:
GVWR 10,000
rGAWR 6,100
rear axle actual rating 6,200

F-350 SRW
GVWR 11,500
rGAWR 7,000
rear axle actual rating 7,280

Very similar differences from 1999 models through the 2014 models.
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Old 11-04-2014, 07:53 PM   #12
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Ford's specs do not agree with you.

Check the part numbers and show me ONE that is different between the two other than the blocks and one spring. ONE. You can't and you won't. The specs are for marketing purposes just like in certain states you can order a de-rated F350 to comply with registration requirements. Period. It's a sticker on the door jamb. Plain and simple. It's certainly not a "spec." What's worse is you know they are the same truck because you have checked the part numbers and yet you continue to spill false info to people who need real and honest advice. You should be ashamed of yourself.
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Old 11-04-2014, 07:56 PM   #13
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Thanks Taken for the advice. I am now completely confused 😊. The main issue I am having is regarding the torque difference between gas and diesel. My concern is will it be able to pull up hills. Flat land is probably OK.
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Old 11-04-2014, 08:03 PM   #14
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Thanks Taken for the advice. I am now completely confused 😊. The main issue I am having is regarding the torque difference between gas and diesel. My concern is will it be able to pull up hills. Flat land is probably OK.

It will, but it will be reving to do so. I had my previous 09 F250 V10 gasser pulling almost the same load as I have now with my 350 6.7. It revved but it got the job done without any of the "white knuckle" or "puckering" moments that the rather conservative crowd at IRV2 will assure you is coming to ruin your life...LOL. Just FYI, you are on the most conservative forum on the net. People here are constantly warning of things that are more rare than being struck by lighting. If you want real answers on what your potential Ford will do, go to the Ford Truck Enthusiasts forum.
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