Go Back   iRV2 Forums > TRAVEL TRAILER, 5th WHEEL & TRUCK CAMPER FORUMS > Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-15-2016, 09:38 PM   #57
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 50
I do see the 50 pound difference, in the sample on the sheet it's 40.

My belief was since it was on the front that it wasn't really part of the pin weight. Thinking about it though it does make sense that it should be the total weight placed onto the vehicle as a result of the tongue/pin weight. I'll change that calculation. I'll change it to total the GCVW automatically. It was a formula at one time. I must have removed them by accident.


I think you guys figured this out but I'll explain it:

GCWR is the maximum weight for your vehicle. When you pull onto the scale, whatever weight is shown can not exceed GCWR.

Gross COMBINED weight rating. It's a rating (maximum, limit, etc).

GVW is Gross vehicle weight is the actual gross vehicle weight. If you're towing a trailer, the GVW would be the weight of the truck PLUS the tongue/pin weight. If you aren't towing a trailer, it's just the total weight of the truck.

GCWV is truck, people, trailer and all. If the GCWV is GREATER than the GVWR then you are overweight. It's a fancy way of saying total weight. That's why in the sample data it's 15k GCVW (truck+trailer) and only 9k for GVW (truck + pin). On a CAT scale slip you'll see it as GROSS WEIGHT.

Thank you for the feedback.
__________________

__________________
2002 Timberland Timberlodge 255RLS
2000 F350 Supercab SRW 4x4 w/ B&W Companion hitch
merc123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 07-15-2016, 10:13 PM   #58
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclone Dave View Post
FifthWheelSt.com
Fantastic work on the website. Lots of info there. I do like your calculators also.
__________________

__________________
2002 Timberland Timberlodge 255RLS
2000 F350 Supercab SRW 4x4 w/ B&W Companion hitch
merc123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2016, 10:34 AM   #59
Senior Member
 
Gordon Dewald's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 8,437
Quote:
Originally Posted by merc123 View Post
I do see the 50 pound difference, in the sample on the sheet it's 40.

My belief was since it was on the front that it wasn't really part of the pin weight. Thinking about it though it does make sense that it should be the total weight placed onto the vehicle as a result of the tongue/pin weight. I'll change that calculation. I'll change it to total the GCVW automatically. It was a formula at one time. I must have removed them by accident.


I think you guys figured this out but I'll explain it:

GCWR is the maximum weight for your vehicle. When you pull onto the scale, whatever weight is shown can not exceed GCWR.

Gross COMBINED weight rating. It's a rating (maximum, limit, etc).

GVW is Gross vehicle weight is the actual gross vehicle weight. If you're towing a trailer, the GVW would be the weight of the truck PLUS the tongue/pin weight. If you aren't towing a trailer, it's just the total weight of the truck.

GCWV is truck, people, trailer and all. If the GCWV is GREATER than the GVWR then you are overweight. It's a fancy way of saying total weight. That's why in the sample data it's 15k GCVW (truck+trailer) and only 9k for GVW (truck + pin). On a CAT scale slip you'll see it as GROSS WEIGHT.

Thank you for the feedback.
I am having some issues with your definition of GCWR which you refer to as GCWV. Here is a link to the GCWR definition that is commonly used. I have not been able to find any reference to GCWV.
How Gross Combined Weight Rating (GCWR) Works | HowStuffWorks
__________________
Gordon and Janet
Tour 42QD/inTech Stacker
Gordon Dewald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2016, 03:32 PM   #60
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon Dewald View Post
I am having some issues with your definition of GCWR which you refer to as GCWV. Here is a link to the GCWR definition that is commonly used. I have not been able to find any reference to GCWV.
How Gross Combined Weight Rating (GCWR) Works | HowStuffWorks
GCWR and GCVW (transposed VW) are two different numbers. GCWR is the max total weight your truck and trailer can be.

GCVW is the actual, scaled gross (total) weight of everything.
__________________
merc123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2016, 08:25 AM   #61
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 50
For simplicity and to conform more to common terms I changed GCVW to Gross Weight.
__________________
2002 Timberland Timberlodge 255RLS
2000 F350 Supercab SRW 4x4 w/ B&W Companion hitch
merc123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2016, 09:47 AM   #62
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Plantation, Fl
Posts: 937
Quote:
Originally Posted by merc123 View Post
For simplicity and to conform more to common terms I changed GCVW to Gross Weight.
I'd suggest using Gross Weight for the TV vehicle only, and Gross Combined Weight for the TV and whatever is being towed, makes more sense to me.
__________________
2014 Itasca Spirit 31K
Mich F is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2016, 09:40 AM   #63
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 1
Blog Entries: 1
Looking to purchase a jay flight 212qbw

Hi everyone im looking to purchase a jayco 212qbw trailer. My main concern is can my truck handle it especially up hills. I own a f150 4.6 liter ford if its to much do you have suggestions on a similar floor plan .but
__________________
leohacker76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2016, 11:30 PM   #64
Member
 
Cyclone Dave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Returned to home in CA to become a grandparent for the first time.
Posts: 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by leohacker76 View Post
Hi everyone im looking to purchase a jayco 212qbw trailer. My main concern is can my truck handle it especially up hills. I own a f150 4.6 liter ford if its to much do you have suggestions on a similar floor plan .but
The very best thing to do is answer your own question by using the app at RVtowCheck.com.
__________________
David W. Gray - Fifth Wheel St. - Provides the only 13 point weight safety report.
Cyclone Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2017, 11:23 AM   #65
Senior Member
 
Gordon Dewald's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 8,437
Quote:
Originally Posted by leohacker76 View Post
Hi everyone im looking to purchase a jayco 212qbw trailer. My main concern is can my truck handle it especially up hills. I own a f150 4.6 liter ford if its to much do you have suggestions on a similar floor plan .but
I would be more concerned down hills. Up hill you will have sufficient power to get to the top. Coming down will you have enough brakes to slow down?
__________________
Gordon and Janet
Tour 42QD/inTech Stacker
Gordon Dewald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2017, 11:34 AM   #66
Senior Member
 
Mr_D's Avatar
 
iRV2 No Limits Club
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 23,334
Quote:
Originally Posted by merc123 View Post
For simplicity and to conform more to common terms I changed GCVW to Gross Weight.
RATINGS are LIMITS established by the manufacturer, which are not to be exceeded. Ratings are based on structural strength, drive train strength, braking power, stability, controllability, and performance. Exceeding a rating invites unsafe conditions, potential damage, may void a warranty, may complicate an insurance claim, and in some cases, may violate a law.

GVWR:
Gross Vehicle Weight Rating

The MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE WEIGHT of the fully loaded vehicle, including liquids, passengers, cargo, and the tongue weight of any towed vehicle.



GAWR:
Gross Axle Weight Rating

The MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE WEIGHT each axle assembly is designed to carry, as measured at the tires, therefore including the weight of the axle assembly itself. GAWR is established by considering the rating of each of its components (tires, wheels, springs, axle), and rating the axle on its weakest link. The GAWR assumes that the LOAD IS EQUAL ON EACH SIDE.

GCWR;
Gross Combined Weight Rating

The MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE COMBINED WEIGHT of the tow vehicle and the attached towed vehicle. GCWR assumes that both vehicles have functioning brakes, with exceptions in some cases for very light towed vehicles, normally less than 1,500 pounds. (Check your chassis manual or towing guide.)



HITCH RATINGS

GTWR:
Gross Trailer Weight Rating
The MAXIMUM TOWED VEHICLE WEIGHT. Each component (receiver, drawbar, ball) of a ball-type hitch has its own rating. Some ball-type hitches have separate ratings when used with a weight distributing system.



TWR/TLR/VLR:
Tongue Weight, Tongue Load, Vertical Load Rating Different terms for the MAXIMUM VERTICAL LOAD that can be carried by the hitch.



TIRE RATINGS
The MAXIMUM LOAD that a tire may carry is engraved on the sidewall, along with a corresponding COLD inflation pressure. A reduction in inflation pressure requires a reduction in load rating. Tire manufacturers publish charts that establish the load capacity at various inflation pressures



WEIGHT and LOAD.
These terms are generally used interchangeably. For the purposes of understanding RV applications, vehicles have WEIGHT, which impart LOADS to tires, axles, and hitches. Scale measurements taken when weighing are LOADS carried by the tires. These measured loads are used to calculate Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW), Gross Axle Weight (GAW), Gross Combination Weight (GCW), and hitch loads.



UVW: Unloaded Vehicle Weight (1996 RVIA Definition)
The WEIGHT of a vehicle as built at the factory with full fuel, engine(generator) oil and coolants. It does not include cargo, fresh water, LP gas, occupants, or dealer installed accessories.



NCC: Net Carrying Capacity
(1996 RVIA Definition, but no longer used) The MAXIMUM WEIGHT of all personal belongings, food, fresh water, LP gas, tools, dealer installed accessories, etc., that can be carried by the RV.

SCWR:
Sleeping Capacity Weight Rating (2000 RVIA Definition)
The manufacturers designated number of sleeping positions multiplied by 154 pounds (70 kilograms)

CCC:
Cargo Carrying Capacity (2000 RVIA Definition)
Equal to GVWR minus each of the following: UVW. full fresh potable water weight (including water heater), full LP gas weight and SCWR.



LIQUID WEIGHTS (pounds per gallon)

* Water: 8.3
* Gasoline: 5.6
* Diesel Fuel: 6.8
* Propane: 4.2
__________________
2009 45' Magna 630 w/Cummins ISX 650 HP/1950 Lbs Ft
Charter Good Sam Lifetime Member, FMCA, SKP
RV'ing since 1957, NRA Benefactor Life, towing '14 CR-V
Mr_D is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2017, 11:38 AM   #67
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 6,519
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon Dewald View Post
I would be more concerned down hills. Up hill you will have sufficient power to get to the top. Coming down will you have enough brakes to slow down?
Not sure I understand the comment about the brakes. The trailer will have brakes that should be capable of stopping itself. There would be no extra braking needed on the tow vehicle.
__________________
twinboat is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2017, 10:25 AM   #68
Senior Member
 
Gordon Dewald's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 8,437
Quote:
Originally Posted by twinboat View Post
Not sure I understand the comment about the brakes. The trailer will have brakes that should be capable of stopping itself. There would be no extra braking needed on the tow vehicle.
You are assuming the trailer brakes are working properly, have been maintained properly and have been set properly. Not always the case as electric trailer brakes can be problematic.
__________________
Gordon and Janet
Tour 42QD/inTech Stacker
Gordon Dewald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2017, 01:21 PM   #69
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 6,519
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon Dewald View Post
You are assuming the trailer brakes are working properly, have been maintained properly and have been set properly. Not always the case as electric trailer brakes can be problematic.
I agree, but thats the case with any large trailer ( think 5er ) on a smaller tow vehicle.
__________________
twinboat is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2017, 05:29 PM   #70
Member
 
Cyclone Dave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Returned to home in CA to become a grandparent for the first time.
Posts: 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by twinboat View Post
Not sure I understand the comment about the brakes. The trailer will have brakes that should be capable of stopping itself. There would be no extra braking needed on the tow vehicle.
True, the truck and trailer have brakes. However, if the truck's GVWR or GAWR are exceeded, then braking capacity may be overwhelmed. You need to weigh your tow ready truck even to begin to know what the realistic vehicle towing capacity is. After getting the scaled truck weight, the GCWR and the GVWR, you then can use RV Tow Check.

There are so many different configurations of the F150, there no one size fits all answer.
__________________

__________________
David W. Gray - Fifth Wheel St. - Provides the only 13 point weight safety report.
Cyclone Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 3 (1 members and 2 guests)
Dojo1228
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tow vehicle too small? Wiley870 Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion 5 02-10-2011 05:35 PM
Tow Vehicle hippyman Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion 1 01-16-2011 06:05 PM
Tow Vehicle Wiring Problem Roger L. Alpine Coach Owner's Forum 22 12-30-2009 11:16 AM
Time to replace the Tow Vehicle.....I think jab3143 Toy Haulers Discussion 17 10-27-2005 10:04 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.