Go Back   iRV2 Forums > TRAVEL TRAILER, 5th WHEEL & TRUCK CAMPER FORUMS > Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-06-2008, 06:50 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 70
Hello all,

I want to draw on the experience of others concerning E load rated tow vehicle tires.

First:
Concerning dry/wet/light snow traction, tread wear/tread life, noise/comfort, fuel economy, and price. What is the best tire?

Second:
Concerning tire air pressure unloaded is there any benefit to running at higher pressure than 60 psi.?

Third:
Loaded the truck sticker says 60 psi front and 75 rear. Would I benefit from running at 80 psi?

Thanks,
Ralph
__________________

__________________
RSmoak is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 10-06-2008, 06:50 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 70
Hello all,

I want to draw on the experience of others concerning E load rated tow vehicle tires.

First:
Concerning dry/wet/light snow traction, tread wear/tread life, noise/comfort, fuel economy, and price. What is the best tire?

Second:
Concerning tire air pressure unloaded is there any benefit to running at higher pressure than 60 psi.?

Third:
Loaded the truck sticker says 60 psi front and 75 rear. Would I benefit from running at 80 psi?

Thanks,
Ralph
__________________

__________________
RSmoak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2008, 09:06 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
450Donn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Dallas,OR
Posts: 2,554
Personally I really like Michelin tires for their longevity, quiet ride and wet/snow traction. As an example, we do not normally get much snow around here, so when it snows it can be a really slick mess. Installed new Michelins on the wife's Tahoe and on the way to the store there was a mini truck in the ditch. being a good samaritan that day, I turned around and pulled him out with noting more than auto 4WD and never spun a tire.
__________________
Don and Lorri
2007 Dodge 3500 dually
Resident Dummy.
450Donn is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2008, 10:14 AM   #4
Moderator Emeritus
 
K-Star's Avatar


 
Texas Boomers Club
Mid Atlantic Campers
Ford Super Duty Owner
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Fulltime - Currently somewhere in the lower 48
Posts: 2,215
I too used Michelin LTX tires. NJ does get snow albeit not as much as we used to. Very good traction in snow.

During the towing season I kept the fronts at 70# and the rears at 80# (recommended pressure based on my 5er weight) so it was always ready to tow at a moments notice. It was a little bumpier without the weight of the 5er but bearable. During the off [winter] season I lowered the pressure to 55# all around.
__________________
John, Joyce & Zoie the Terrier. - Fulltime since `08

2017 Solitude by Grand Design
2012 Ford F-450 Lariat
K-Star is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2008, 10:19 AM   #5
Moderator Emeritus
 
RustyJC's Avatar


 
Texas Boomers Club
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Cypress, Texas USA
Posts: 8,854
On our dually, I went with the Michelin XPS Ribs due to the unique conditions we live with in Texas:

1. Little or no snow

2. Scorching summertime temperatures

3. Long stretches of sustained higher speeds

These commercial all-steel construction tires aren't cheap, but experience with them on heavy 5th wheels indicates that they can handle the heat, speed and high loads and the hotshot rigs consistently get 80K miles or better with them.

Rusty
__________________
2016 Ram Longhorn 3500 Dually 4x4 CCLB, 385/900 Cummins, Aisin AS69RC, 4.10
2014.5 DRV Mobile Suites 38RSSA #6972
Come join us on a TEXAS BOOMERS rally!
RustyJC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2008, 02:22 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
ParTheCourse's Avatar
 
Newmar Owners Club
Nor'easters Club
Ford Super Duty Owner
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Chittenango, (Syr) NY
Posts: 980
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Third: Loaded the truck sticker says 60 psi front and 75 rear. Would I benefit from running at 80 psi? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I would run what it says on the wall of the tire.

They are referring to the tires that came out of the factory.

Depending on the manufacturer you choose you can go their web sight and get tire inflation recommendations for various weights.
__________________
'4? Wife Lynda
'08 F450 PSD CREW
'08 Newmar Cypress 36LKSH
ParTheCourse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2008, 05:07 PM   #7
Moderator Emeritus
 
TXiceman's Avatar


 
Vintage RV Owners Club
Texas Boomers Club
Oklahoma Boomers Club
Ford Super Duty Owner
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Full Time, TX Home Base
Posts: 17,150
Blog Entries: 21
I went tot he Michelin LTX on our dually. I have never had a problem with Michelin tires or Bridgestone tires. cannot say the same of Goodyear, Firestone of Goodrich.

Ken
__________________
Amateur Radio Operator (KE5DFR)|Full-Time! - 2012 6.7L Ford Crew Cab Dually -2013 HitchHiker Champagne 38RLRSB - Travel with one Standard Schnauzer and one small Timneh African Gray Parrot
TXiceman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2008, 07:18 PM   #8
North Central Texas Area Leader
 
allendp's Avatar
 
Thor Owners Club
Texas Boomers Club
Oklahoma Boomers Club
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Killeen, Texas, USA
Posts: 2,633
My truck came with Michelin's and they were very good. Got about 50K miles out of them before I replaced them. They were not worth anything in snow as I learned on a trip with them to the Northwest. I replace them with BF Goodrich in Grand Junction, CO because the Discount Tire Store did not have the Michelin in stock and recommended the tire for winter weather. I must say say they were very good in snow, nice ride, and show very little wear after 40K miles. I run 70 lbs in rear and 65 lbs in front all the time.
__________________
Don & Pat Allen - Texas Boomers - Honorary Oklahoma Boomers
2017 Keystone Sprinter 269FWRLS - 2003 Dodge Ram 3500
allendp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2008, 05:39 PM   #9
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 9
I run Michelin XPS Traction tires on my 03 F350 dually. These have been the best tires I have ever owned. The only drawback to them is, you cannot go by the air pressure numbers supplied by Ford. If you do, you will have way too much air in them and the outer edges will not make contact with the road... Empty, I run 60psi in the fronts and 45 in the rear. Loaded, I air them up to 55 in the rear.
__________________
2003 F350, 6.0 PSD/TorqShift. Lots of goodies and bling. Pulling a 2009 Jayco Eagle 351RLSA.

teamroper60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2008, 06:46 PM   #10
Moderator Emeritus
 
Vette Racer's Avatar


 
Oklahoma Boomers Club
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Sand Springs, Oklahoma
Posts: 2,823
I for one cannot recommend the BFG Commerical TA tires. I tried them on my dually and they have not worked well. I had a lot of trouble getting them balanced and they have rode really rough. I replaced the factory goodyear's which were D rated tires and really regretted putting these E rated tires on. I see no need for the E rated tires carrying a normally rated 5th wheel trailer, and boy, did they make a difference in the ride, both empty and loaded.
__________________
Tom
KE5NCP
2016 Silver Ram 3500 CC Dually, 2011 HitchHiker DA 349 RSB, 2014 Wrangler unlimited Rubicon
Vette Racer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2008, 03:02 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,079
My current 2500 Dodge/Cummins 2wd came with Michelin LTX AS which are very mild tread. Very poor tire for traction on green grass/wet boat ramps/any type of snow or ice but with 110k they have been a excellent dry highway tire. I'm putting new tires on this month before winter. I'll go with the Bridgestone Revo LT E all terrain for better all around performance. I have them (C load range) on the wifes 1500 chev and do a good job.
Tire pressure ? Don't know what your driving so no recommendations. My 2500 Dodge/Cummins came with LT265/70-17 E. The door post recommended 50 frt and 70 rear. Those numbers were a joke. I found the front worked best with 65 psi towing or non towing (the Cummins is very heavy) and 80 psi in the rear when hauling max axle loads. My 5er isn't max axle load so 70-75 works great. I also air down the rears to 45 psi when empty.

Jim
__________________
'03 Dodge 2500 Cummins HO 3.73 NV5600 Jacobs
'98 3500 DRW 454 4x4 4.10 crew cab
'97 Park Avanue RK 28' 2 slides
JIMNLIN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2008, 09:27 AM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 70
Thanks to everyone for your comments, advice, suggestions, and most of all your experience.

"First:
Concerning dry/wet/light snow traction, tread wear/tread life, noise/comfort, fuel economy, and price. What is the best tire?"

Looks like most of you prefer Michelin. Since my truck dealer was paying to replace the old tires (and I didn't want them to say no) I went with a tire that's $40 cheaper per tire. Tire Rack rated the Firestone Transforce HT higher than the Michelin LTX A/S in a 265/70 17 E. On my 2006, F250, crew, short, 6.0 PSD, automatic, 3.73 they seem great so far. Just one trip with the trailer and one toad floater rain storm; so far I'm impressed.

"Second:
Concerning tire air pressure unloaded is there any benefit to running at higher pressure than 60 psi.?"

So far it seems that running higher pressure when unloaded only makes the ride less comfortable. Kinda like running with basketballs for tires.

"Third:
Loaded the truck sticker says 60 psi front and 75 rear. Would I benefit from running at 80 psi?"

I went with the sticker recommended full load pressures and was satisfied.

Thanks again folks,
Ralph
__________________
RSmoak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 06:45 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Steve Rankin's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Olympic Peninsula, Washington
Posts: 122
Send a message via ICQ to Steve Rankin
We had an '04 F350 4X4 PSD that came with Pirelli Scorpion 265/70R16 LR'E' tires with a typical 'All Season' tread pattern. They were excellent in dry and wet road conditions, but lacked traction on wet grass and the other usual off-road situations. Wet grass is a common issue for us when maneuvering the TT at home as well as occasionally in CG's. The Pirellis were also easily overwhelmed by snow and ice.

We also had a set of Bridgestone Blizzak W965's in the same size. They were fantastic in snow and ice. The F350 drove better in 2WD on snow and ice than our AWD Subaru did with its OE all season tires.

Our '05 Chevy 2500HD has Cooper ATR 265/70R16 LR'E' tires with an 'All Terrain' tread pattern. The Coopers work well in most conditions, including snow but not ice. A set of Bridgestone Blizzak W965's will be put on shortly. The all terrain Coopers are noisier than the others though.

We have a set of Michelin 235/80R16s highway rib tires on our '88 F250. They work fine in most highway conditions, but are nearly useless on anything other than pavement. They do wear forever and are very quiet though. But, then an old F250 with a 460 & 4.30 rear end is so noisy that who could tell if the tires were loud.

We've also had Michelin LTX & ATX on SUV's and pickups, but they were in P-series sizes.

As for tire pressure. We run 55/65 front/rear when empty and 60/80 when trailering. IMHO, the 80 PSI OE recommended pressure for the rear tires regardless of load is CYA lawyer talk by the truck manufacturer. If some dummie doesn't put more air in his tires when he hitches up, the manufacturer doesn't want it looking like it was their fault.
__________________

__________________
Steve & C. J.
2007 Excel L30RKE
2010 Ram 3500 Laramie 4X4; TrailerSaver & MOR/ryde
Steve Rankin is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pickup tow vehicle questions gary85 Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion 10 07-09-2008 06:00 AM
New tow Vehicle 06PSD4ME New Rig Show-Off! 7 05-22-2006 04:58 AM
New tow vehicle Corona Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion 5 04-11-2005 04:03 PM
Problems with buying a vehicle that was used as a tow vehicle. KeithT Toads and Motorhome Related Towing 17 01-17-2005 06:07 AM
Looking for new Tow Vehicle Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion 25 12-31-1969 07:00 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:10 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.