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Old 05-23-2013, 11:20 PM   #1
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Towing Capabilities

Anyone who can help this newly. I have a 2008 Yukon XL Denali AWD. It is equipped with the air ride and all that other fancy stuff. I am in the process of buying a 2013 wildwood Heritage Glen (312qbud) 35.85' with a dry weight of 6840 and a hitch weight of 855. I have looked at my owners manual for towing capabilities for the denali but the dealer who sold me my used SUV gave me a plan owners manual instead of the denali one so i can only get generalizations from this manual.

Can my Yukon handle this trailer?

Thanks for your help.
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Old 05-24-2013, 12:04 AM   #2
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The age old question , " How much can I tow ?"
Right now , with the information at hand , that's too much trailer for your Yukon. No mention of motor size , trans type, 1/2 ton , but we'll go with the basics.
First you will never tow that trailer ( except from the dealer to your house, the first day ) empty. So dry weight , which are almost always wrong is no use for any practical purpose.
You need the trailer GVW, your vehicle GVW and GCVW . Gross Combined Vehicle Weight.
When you get your vehicle GVW , should be on the door post with the tire inflation information. Run the Yukon over the scales, get front axle weight, rear axle weight, and total vehicle weight, with a full tank of fuel.
The difference between the scale weight and your door sticker GVW will be your CCC. Cargo Carrying Capacity. Add up the weight of all other passengers who would be in the Yukon when you go on a trip, along with a few on board essentials , then add in 1,000 lbs for the hitch weight( because I'll bet that is closer to the actual hitch weight of a trailer that size; another poster today found out the hitch weight of his trailer was 400 lbs higher than advertized. ) $5 says if you do this you will find that trailer will overload your vehicle. BY A BUNCH.
If a salesman told you you could tow that trailer with your Yukon ; He lied to make the sale.
JMHO. You require a properly equiped 3/4 ton ( or bigger ) P/U with a Trailer Tow Capacity of 10,000 lbs minimum, to safely handle that trailer.
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Old 05-24-2013, 12:25 AM   #3
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Ok so I looked at my door and the GVWR is 7400lbs. The engine size is a 6.2L, trans is a Allison automatic with a hydra-mastic 6 speed trans. Has the tow/haul mode and is a 1500 I believe.

On the hitch it says weight carried 5000 and hitch 600.
Weight distributing 10000 and hitch 1000
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Old 05-24-2013, 12:55 AM   #4
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The hitch weight info , is for the hitch ONLY , not the entire vehicle .
The hitch could handle a 10,000 lbs trailer , with equalizer bars , attached to the frame of a 3/4 ton truck, not your Yukon. Sorry.
At 7400 GVWR it's a 1/2 ton.
With AWD and the air suspension yours is a heavy vehicle , for your own info ,fill the tank, weigh the vehicle and do the math.
I think you will find your CCC could be as low as 1400lbs.
The weight of the reciever, bars and the trailer tongue has to come out of that number.
When you find all the info for your Yukon , I think you will find that the max trailer weigh towable will be in the 6,000lbs, loaded, range.
GCVWR of 13,500 or so.
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Old 05-24-2013, 11:17 AM   #5
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Ok so I got off the phone with GM and they said my max towing is 7900lbs. The first TT I was going to buy was 6850 dry weight. So I told the dealer to find me something similar but lighter. He came back with a passport ultra lite 3220bh with a dry weight of 6109lbs and a hitch weight of 600 which is what my hitch rating is if I don't have a weight distributing hitch.

What to do what to do. Thanks for your help.
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Old 05-24-2013, 11:51 AM   #6
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I still think that is alot of trailer for that vehicle. If you are going camping or taking a trip you will be bringing stuff. Whether you think so or not you will have way more "stuff" than you think you will. In looking at a bunkhouse model I am also guessing that you will be travelling with more than just you. More people means more "stuff". The GCWC is around 13,500 for that Yukon. The max weight of that trailer is about 7500 pounds. I would guess that once you get some water and propane onboard, along with all your "stuff) you will be approaching or exeeding that 7500 pounds. The weight of your vehicle with people, fuel, "stuff", plus the weight of the trailer will put you at or above the GCWC.

Can you tow it...yes. Should you...personal decision. If you are going to be in hills or mountains you will really be feeling the weight of that trailer...both on the way up and down a hill. I have been in that situation before and vowed never to do that again.
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Old 05-24-2013, 11:59 AM   #7
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This is why I am asking you guys because I don't know. Thanks. Looking for something around 4000-5000 now
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Old 05-24-2013, 04:56 PM   #8
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This is the trailer I am looking at buying. With all that's said about my Yukon will this trailer work?
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Old 05-24-2013, 06:41 PM   #9
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Your towing weight is a MAXIMUM. It is based on a truck with only a 150# driver, no cargo, no passengers, no hitch. For every pound you add beyond this theoretical base truck, you reduce the tow rating by the same amount.

So you need to head down to the local scales with the family, normal cargo, full fuel and a hitch (if no hitch add another 100#).

The GVWR is on the door jamb sticker and the GCWR is in the owners manual and listed for your specific engine, axle and drive.

GCWR - loaded truck = MAX loaded trailer weight (not dry weight)

GVWR - loaded truck = MAX loaded trailer hitch weight.

When the trailer is loaded, your hitch weight can run between 10 and 15% of thee trailer weight (loaded). Use 12% of the trailer GVWR as an estimate.

With the 1/2 ton truck, you will most likely exceed GVWR before you reach the GCWR limits.

With a 1/2 ton truck, you need to be looking closer to 25' actual length to get into your weight limits. You could go a bit longer with a hybrid trailer.

A trailers dry weight is the base trailer and any option listed as an option is not included in the weight. So you will need to add for the microwave, TV, awning, battery(ies), full propane tanks etc. Then add you camping supplies, water, food, chairs, BBQ, fishing tackle, etc.

The delivered weight can easily go on up to 1000# more than the dry weight. I think you will be at your limits with the trailer.

I wish there was a truth in advertising for truck and trailer weights.

Ken
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Old 05-25-2013, 01:37 AM   #10
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HOW, does a company get away with producing and advertising a unit for sale without listing a GVWR. Don't they know what the axles are rated for ? Can't they do the arithmatic for themselves? I don't know about where you live , but if I showed up at the local DOMV and tried to register a trailer without the GVWR in writing from the manufacturer, I'd be thrown out into the street. Sorry for the rant but that's B.......T.

2X what Ken says , still too big. Sorry.
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Old 05-26-2013, 01:18 PM   #11
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MG, forget about a full tank of gas and the driver. If you're that close to maxing out, what you're looking at is too heavy. Why not ask the dealer what the unit weighs as equipped, add another 1,500 lbs, or whatever you think is reasonable, for spouses, kids, dogs, tools, etc., and go from there? Your engine, equipped with the allison will pull more than the vehicle is engineered to pull.
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Old 05-26-2013, 04:33 PM   #12
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I have a friend with a 2011 Yukon Denali, going the same thing. He wants a toy hauler to carry his two bikes. He is finding out that there are very few choices in toy haulers light enough for the Denali. Probably more TT's available. Good luck
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Old 05-27-2013, 07:57 AM   #13
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Go back to the dealer or contact the manufacturer for your tow vehicle and get the towing specs for your vehicle and that will answer your question. Get the facts, ignore the personal opinions.
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Old 05-27-2013, 09:04 AM   #14
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Go back to the dealer or contact the manufacturer for your tow vehicle and get the towing specs for your vehicle and that will answer your question.
No, that won't answer your question. That will give you the overstated "tow rating" and "payload rating" which are based on the shipping weight of a new tow vehicle with no options and absolutely nothing in it but a skinny driver. You cannot tow anywhere near the weight of the tow rating without being overloaded. And you cannot haul anywhere near the hitch weight that the payload rating would suggest.

To get a good estimate of how to match trailer to tow vehicle without being overloaded, you need to know the actual weight of the wet and loaded tow vehicle when it's ready to tie onto the trailer. And you must know the GVWR of the tow vehicle, and that info is available on the Federal Certification Label that is on the doorframe of your tow vehicle - the same label that includes month/year of assembly, tire info, and several codes. Subtract the weight of the wet and loaded tow vehicle from the GVWR of the tow vehicle and the answer is the maximum hitch weight you can have without being overloaded. Divide that hitch weight by 0.15 and the answer is the maximum GVWR of any TT you should consider if you don't want to be overloaded. Or divide that hitch weight by 0.20 and the answer is the maximum GVWR of any fifth-wheel RV trailer you should consider if you don't want to be overloaded.

NEVER use the dry weight of the trailer for any computations. Nobody tows a dry trailer, and your trailer when brand new and empty probably was heavier than the dry weight suggests. Use the GVWR of the trailer as the probable wet and loaded weight of the trailer when ready to go camping. Then you'll have a good chance of not being overloaded when on the road in the middle of your third camping trip.
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