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Old 06-26-2015, 07:51 AM   #15
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Chilax and make sure you keep air in your tires!
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Old 06-26-2015, 08:16 PM   #16
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Also I was going 70 when the third went but had not been for very long, I potentially had been doing significant breaking by dropping several thousand feet in only a dozen miles or so which might explain excessive heat.
Your Towmaster tires are a ST tire and are speed restricted to 65 mph which may say so on the tires sidewall.
ST tires have a basket ball shaped sidewall for a soft ride. However that rounded sidewall has more flex. Speed creates more heat so its not surprising they were hot.

As others have said just cold set your tires pressure each morning if your tires are close to max loaded. I wouldn't worry with 5-6 psi unless your tires are carrying max loads.
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Old 06-26-2015, 08:51 PM   #17
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Agree.. If you're worried, set them to rate pressure in the morning and don't worry about it. You're getting variations due to heat and altitude. Within as far as you can tow for a day, if you set them in the AM, you'll be fine.

Give us the DOT code on the tires - the complete code. I'm much more concerned about who makes them than the correct pressure.

That brand generates some complaints: http://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov/owners/SearchSafetyIssues

I wouldn't load those tires beyond 80% of capacity - I can't tell your actual trailer weight. And they're going to degrade a bit every year. Basically, I'd replace them just based on brand/reputation UNLESS you're really on the light side of their rated capacity.
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Old 06-30-2015, 10:30 PM   #18
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Sorry I didn't find this thread sooner. Some good info and some a little off base. Rather that specific quotes I will try and cover the important points.

It is correct to set pressure when the tire is at ambient and not warmed by being in direct Sunlight or from having been driven for more than 2 miles in previous two hours.

As a tire heats up the pressure will increase by 2% for every 10F increase. This is covered in a post on my blog where I do the math to provide the proof of the Gas LAw.

Elivation change can also affect tire pressure but to a smaller extent so in itself I wouldn't worry about it if you ar setting the pressure before traveling.

The example for the 2 drivers seems reasonable but when the first person parked for a few hours the tires cooled from running temperature to ambient. At that point the tires could have been set to the correct infl for the conditions which means the ambient temperature.

Now to what is correct infl. There are two answers. Motorized vehicles should set all tires on each axle to no less than the inflation found in the Load & Inflation tables for the heavier end of the axle.
I suggest that the morning "set" pressure be 10% above that minimum inflation. This is covered in my blog.
Multi axle trailers need to address Interply Shear (covered in my blog) which is a force that tries to tear the belts off the tire carcass. You can lower the shear force by increasing tire pressure to the pressure on the tire sidewall.

Everyone that thinks having oil pressure gauge, temperature gauge and volt gauge for their engine is a good idea should be running TPMS. You never know when you can pick up a nail or cut or have a valve stick open (example shown in my blog). I once retrieved a 6" piece of barb wire from the dirt exit road of a campground so if someone had checked pressure in the campsite and then driven over the barb wiire they might have had a puncture which made the pressure check at the campsite wasted effort.

Hope I covered all the questions.
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Old 07-01-2015, 09:43 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timetogo View Post
From Discount Tire:

Inflation
  • Always inflate trailer tires to the maximum inflation indicated on the sidewall.
  • Check inflation when the tires are cool and have not been exposed to the sun.
  • If the tires are hot to the touch from operation, add three psi to the max inflation.
  • Underinflation is the number one cause of trailer tire failure.
Load Carrying Capacity

  • All tires must be identical in size for the tires to properly manage the weight of the trailer.
  • The combined capacity of the tires must equal or exceed the Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) of the axle.
  • The combined capacity of all of the tires should exceed the loaded trailer weight by 20 percent.
  • If the actual weight is not available, use the trailer GVW. If a tire fails on a tandem axle trailer, you should replace both tires on that side. The remaining tire is likely to have been subjected to excessive loading.
  • If the tires are replaced with tires of larger diameter, the tongue height may need to be adjusted to maintain proper weight distribution.
All of the above applies when prior/starting your trip. Now add the complexities of load weight distribution on your trailer and road conditions you will then have potential pressure/temperature variations. These variances can only be monitored via the TPMS and real time adjustments made en-route, such as, load balancing shifting weight from higher temps to low temp axle/wheels, slow speed, ambient temps [travel other than during the max heat of the day or take a break to cool tire temps) consider neg impacts if you air down. The TPMS will give you the viability of conditions leading to a blowout or if you loose pressure leading to a flat.
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Old 07-01-2015, 10:11 PM   #20
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Tires aren't an exact science. Every situation is slightly different and so the manufacturers try to make rules simple enough for users to follow. Ideally, you'd want to start out at some pressure for a given load, and then bleed off pressure as you travel to maintain that pressure as the tire heats. Of course, when you stop for the night, you'll need to add air again to start all over. For normal street use, no one would do this, and so we search for the best compromise.
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Old 07-02-2015, 12:52 PM   #21
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Tires aren't an exact science. Every situation is slightly different and so the manufacturers try to make rules simple enough for users to follow. Ideally, you'd want to start out at some pressure for a given load, and then bleed off pressure as you travel to maintain that pressure as the tire heats. Of course, when you stop for the night, you'll need to add air again to start all over. For normal street use, no one would do this, and so we search for the best compromise.
"bleed off pressure as you travel" Absolutely NOT.

The pressure needed to carry the load is established with the tire at ambient. Tires are designed to accommodate and even take advantage of the inherent pressure increase due to temperature increase. Bleeding hot pressure in an effort to get back to the "cold" pressure is bad for tires and potentially UNSAFE.

Whoever gave you that information does not have the knowledge to be qualified to offer any advice on tires.

You don't start at "some pressure" You should run no less than the inflation needed to carry the load on the heaviest loaded tire on the axle. A slight margin like +10% of that minimum cold inflation is very reasonable.
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Old 07-02-2015, 12:55 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by timetogo View Post
From Discount Tire:

Inflation
  • Always inflate trailer tires to the maximum inflation indicated on the sidewall.
  • Check inflation when the tires are cool and have not been exposed to the sun.
  • If the tires are hot to the touch from operation, add three psi to the max inflation.
  • Underinflation is the number one cause of trailer tire failure.
Load Carrying Capacity

  • All tires must be identical in size for the tires to properly manage the weight of the trailer.
  • The combined capacity of the tires must equal or exceed the Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) of the axle.
  • The combined capacity of all of the tires should exceed the loaded trailer weight by 20 percent.
  • If the actual weight is not available, use the trailer GVW. If a tire fails on a tandem axle trailer, you should replace both tires on that side. The remaining tire is likely to have been subjected to excessive loading.
  • If the tires are replaced with tires of larger diameter, the tongue height may need to be adjusted to maintain proper weight distribution.

In general I like what Discount Tire is saying. While I might have some minor differences if I were to write the same post they are not substancial and I don't think you would be wrong to follow their advice.
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Old 07-04-2015, 02:35 PM   #23
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Trailer tire pressure vs. Heat

I just traveled a little over 2000 miles and I never had to adjust anything over three weeks. Michelin XPS RIB temps ran 10-15 degrees above OAT and pressures rose about 8-10 psi max above my starting pressure of 80 psi. Temps varied a few degrees depending on sun position and daily temperatures were in mid to upper 90's the entire time. I towed at 70 mph most of the time or whatever the speed limit was, of course adjusting for any conditions. TPMS is one of the best things I've ever bought for towing, they are worth every penny to me and can't believe I didn't use it before.

Metal valve stems are on the Michelins and tire pressures rarely ever needs adjusting. The only real fluctuation seems to be with temperatures. I'll put the toy hauler in the storage unit and get it out 3-4 months later and tire pressure is usually within 3-5 psi of 80 pounds.
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Old 07-04-2015, 05:02 PM   #24
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RV Tire Problems
A lot of personal opinions and not facts are being posted on the forum about trailer tires. The majority of it is personal opinions that unfortunately a lot of people without the facts pay attention to, and, end up spending a lot of hard earned money on new tires because of the personal opinions that were posted on the forum by wannabe tire experts. Most people don’t have a clue as to what caused their tire failure all they really know is the tire failed.
Unfortunately newbie’s with little to no RV experience and others with little knowledge of tires are misled by these wannabes and end up with a lot of unfounded tire failure misconceptions causing them to worry and spend their hard earned money replacing perfectly good tires.
A lot of people have a bias against foreign made products. That’s too bad because more and more manufacturers are having their products made by foreign companies. I would prefer that all American sold products be made in this country but that is not the world we live in, if you can’t control it or you haven’t done anything to change it then don’t complain about it and keep your misleading opinions to yourself.
Before foreign companies started making the tires all the complaints about trailer tires were the same as they are now. American and foreign made tires all perform the same. If you don’t think foreign made tires meet DOT standards then do something about it like report it to the DOT or your congressman and quit whining and misleading people about the tires. Some people complain about foreign made tires having inferior rubber, they don’t have facts to back up their claim. If you want a tire that will solve your tire problems then think about getting larger stronger tires. Light truck tires appear to last longer than ST tires based on comments I have seen on the forum, not facts.
Things to avoid that can damage tires:
1. Extended storage. Side walls tend to break down.
2. Improper inflation. Keep the tires inflated to the proper level when in storage or in use, 24/7/365. Under/over inflation when in use causes the heat to build up higher than what the tire is rated for which damages the tire.
3. High speed. Limit your speed to the max the tire is rated for, most are 65mph. Traveling over the max causes heat buildup above what the tires are rated for which damages the tire.
4. Hitting potholes in our wonderful highways and roads, running off the edge of the road, hitting curbs, rubbing tires against the curb. All of these things damage the tires. Belts break down and tires throw the tread.
5. Extended driving on hot highways in hot weather can damage tires from overheating.
6. Overloaded trailers, this will cause your tires to overheat, get rid of the extra weight.
7. Environment – keep tires covered to protect against the weather and sunlight.
8. Age, check with the tire manufacturer to educate yourself about when tires should be replaced.
9. Dry rot, check with the tire manufacturer to educate yourself about dry rot.
10. Mechanical problems like brakes sticking, or bad wheel bearings can cause the wheel to overheat which will cause the tire to overheat which damages the tire.
11. Defects in materials and workmanship. Highly doubtful this causes all tire failures.
Tire Pressure
Check your tire pressure when the RV has not been driven for 3 - 4 hours. That is when the tire is "cold". Forget ambient temp, 80psi at 10 degrees F is the same as 80psi at 100 degrees F. If you over inflate or under inflate the tires this can cause the tires to run hotter than normal which can damage the tires and cause tire failure. Stick with the PSI on the side of the tires. No need to turn this into rocket science. Check with the tire manufacturers if you need an education on tire inflation. Tire pressure does rise as the tire temp rises after driving down the road just like it is supposed to which is why you are supposed to check the pressure when the tire is “cold”.
Tire Temp
An Infra Red Thermometer can be a useful tool if you know how to use it. It will tell you the temp of the tire. You need to know the max temp for the tire if you are going to monitor it. If the temp of the tire is higher than the max temp the tire is rated for then you may have a problem (trailer is overloaded, improper inflation, or a mechanical problem). If you are checking to see if the tire is over the max rated temp and you don’t know what the max rated temp is, then you are wasting money for the thermometer and wasting time using it. Don’t mislead people into thinking they need an Infra Red Thermometer causing them to waste money and time.
Replacing Failed Tires
The tire dealer will prorate your failed tire and sell you a new one. Do not let the tire dealer keep the failed tire when you have it replaced. Contact the tire manufacturer about the failure. The manufacturer will arrange for a local tire dealer to ship the failed tire to them and reimburse you for the price you paid for the new tire plus pay for any damages to the RV caused by the tire failure if you provide estimates of repair. This has been my experience with Goodyear and Carlisle.
This can be a very helpful forum if you forget the personal opinions and prejudices, get the facts, and communicate the facts to help others learn. Post useful information like what caused a tire failure not dumb comments like”I had a China bomb blowout”.

Altitude
65 psi at 500ft above sea level is the same as 65 psi at 10,000 ft above sea level. Dont get tangled up in this.

Truck Tires vs Trailer Tires
This is not a valid comparison. Truck tires are made differently than trailer tires. Truck tires tend to be stronger than trailer tires and they certainly do not carry the weight that trailer tires carry. I haven’t had a truck tire failure since I started driving pick ups in 1975.
Trailer Tires
I started with American made trailer tires in 1975 and continued using American made trailer tires until they began being made in China. I have had just as many American made trailer tire failures as Chinese made trailer tire failures. If I am to use the same logic as those who say trailer tires fail because they are Chinese made then based on my experience I would have to say that American manufacturers set the standard for trailer tires and the Chinese manufacturers are just meeting American standards. So whats the problem with Chinese made trailer tires?
How good are Chinese tires?
http://www.rvtiresafety.com/2012/01/...ese-tires.html
Why are “Bad tires” on the road? http://www.rvtiresafety.com/2012/01/why-are-bad-tires-on-road.html
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Old 07-04-2015, 07:16 PM   #25
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No, never let air out. Tires are, according to mfgrs., designed to accommodate increased pressure from use and/or elevation. ST tires should be at max PSI before starting out in the AM, unless the tire mfgr. has posted weight charts and you know what your rig weighs. In that case you may reduce pressure accordingly, but that generally applies more to self-propelled rigs and non-ST tires.
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Old 07-05-2015, 09:05 AM   #26
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Old 07-05-2015, 12:48 PM   #27
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I have a TPMS on my trailer by TST. It gives me a read of PSI and temp with alarms set for rate of PSI loss and low PSI along with high heat. I might loose a tire but hope to save the rim.
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Old 07-06-2015, 11:51 AM   #28
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Tst tpms

Hello Sir,

Please feel free to call me to discuss in more detail. My name is Mike Benson with TST and I am available until midnight 7 days a week at 770-889-9102
Thanks,
Mike Benson
TST
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