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Old 01-20-2014, 05:50 PM   #1
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Tundra

I have a 2010 Tundra 2wd 5.7 towing package. Is this vehicle big enough to pull 33 ft prowler 6700lbs?
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Old 01-20-2014, 06:00 PM   #2
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I have a 2010 Tundra 2wd 5.7 towing package. Is this vehicle big enough to pull 33 ft prowler 6700lbs?


Depends. If that 6,700 pounds is the GVWR of the trailer, then maybe, but probably not without being overloaded. But if that 6,700 pounds is the unloaded weight or dry weight of the trailer, then definitely not.

Load your truck with everything that will be in it when towing - people, pets, tools, options such as bedliner and grill guard, cooler?, firewood?, and hitch. Go to a truckstop that has a certified automated truck scale, fill up with gas, and weigh the wet and loaded truck. Subtract the weight of the wet and loaded truck from the GVWR of the truck. The answer will be the max hitch weight you can have without exceeding the GVWR of the truck. Divide the answer by 0.15 to see the max GVWR of any trailer you should consider. I'll bet it's a lot less than 6,700 pounds.

(My half-ton pickup is overloaded with my TT that grosses 4,870 pounds when wet and loaded for the road.)
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Old 01-20-2014, 06:40 PM   #3
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Looking in my 2010 Trailer Life Magazine towing guide it list all 2010 Tundra's with the 5.7L 2WD between 10,400 & 10,800 depending on the cab. So even if the dry weight of a trailer is in the 6500 to 7000 range I think you will be fine. You will need a weight distribution hitch.

I just took delivery of 14' Tundra last week with the 5.7L and will tow a 5100 (wet) tt, but I know in the future I can move up to a larger tt if need be.
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Old 01-20-2014, 07:05 PM   #4
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I doubt if a 33' travel trailer will weight 6700# loaded. I would suspect over 8000#. even if you are within the weight limits with a loaded truck and trailer, I would not pull that long of a trailer with a 1/2 ton truck.

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Old 01-20-2014, 07:12 PM   #5
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I doubt if a 33' travel trailer will weight 6700# loaded. I would suspect over 8000#.
If your talking old school Prowler's from the 80's or 90's, yes they may be closer to 8k, but tt's now in the 33' to 34' can range from 6000 to 6500.
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Old 01-20-2014, 08:03 PM   #6
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Looking in my 2010 Trailer Life Magazine towing guide it list all 2010 Tundra's with the 5.7L 2WD between 10,400 & 10,800 depending on the cab.
That's the tow rating, which is grossly overstated on most half-ton pickups with V8 engines. The tow rating is GCWR minus the weight of the truck. The manufacturer's numbers are bogus because the tow rating assumes an empty truck with nothing in it but a skinny driver. No options, no passengers, no tools, nothing but a skinny driver.

The tow rating tells you only the weight of the trailer your drivetrain can pull at a reasonable speed up a reasonable grade without overheating anything in the drivetrain. It ignores the GVWR used to calculate the available payload required to haul the hitch weight of the trailer.

And yet, all truck manufacturers state that you should NEVER exceed either the GVWR or the GCWR of the tow vehicle.

On almost all tow vehicles with single rear wheels (SRW), you will run out of GVWR long before you get close to the GCWR. So ignore the tow ratings and get informed about payload limits.
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Old 01-28-2014, 07:27 PM   #7
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TOWING SAE J2807
SAE J2807 is the standard for tow ratings set by the Society
of Automotive Engineers, SAE. Toyota agreed to adopt the
standard f
or 2013 and is the only manufacturer to have done
so. In fact, since 20
10, the entire Toyota lineup has been SAE
J2807 compliant
This new standard (J2807) in fact lowered the Tundra's towing limit by a few 100 lbs. Any truck maker could say this vehicle can tow 14k, but you have to stop 14k too. Below is Edmunds reason the other (non-Toyota) companies don't want a standardized tow standard. Edmunds.com acticle

Even if most pickup owners never actually tow anything, they still pay attention to how much trucks can tow. It's an unofficial litmus test of strength, durability and plain ol' bragging rights.
The marketers of pickup trucks are all too aware of this. They have waged a seemingly never-ending arms race of tow ratings — particularly among the ultra-competitive Detroit Three automakers.
But since every automaker defines the parameters of its own towing capacity tests, the temptation is always there to "exaggerate" a bit, especially if it means beating the competition's latest model by a few hundred pounds or so.
For buyers, it can be misleading since a pickup truck that advertises it can tow 9,800 pounds isn't necessarily "better" than one rated at 9,500 pounds. Testing variations from one manufacturer to the next means most tow numbers are rarely ever comparable.
The Solution
With this in mind, engineers from the Detroit Three automakers and several Japanese truck makers got together with the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). The idea was to create a voluntary standardized testing procedure for tow ratings.
It took years, but by 2008 the cooperative developed SAE standard J2807: "Performance Requirements for Determining Tow-Vehicle Gross Combination Weight Rating and Trailer Weight Rating."
Finally, a 9,800-pound tow rating for a Ford F-150 would be the same as a 9,800-pound rating for a Chevy Silverado 1500 and any other truck certified to J2807. The SAE committee recommended that the new testing procedures be adopted by at least the 2013 model year.
Problem solved, sort of.
Marketing Roadblock
A predictable detour came on the road to standardized towing tests, though. Although the automakers' engineers toiled for years to create tow-rating commonality, the gang in marketing had a much harder time discerning the benefit. If everybody had to test to the same standards, tow-rating superiority would become much tougher to claim.
And perhaps equally alarming, it became apparent the new towing tests were going to lead to a significant tow-rating reduction for many models. Why?
Most manufacturer procedures generate higher tow maximum ratings because they assume that the truck has no options, you are alone with no luggage and you weigh 150 pounds (the average between a 50th percentile adult male and a 50th percentile adult female).
This matters because the tow rating is what's left when you subtract the curb weight of the truck and its occupants and their cargo from the Gross Combined Weight Rating (GCWR) of the truck. Make the driver and truck weight smaller and the tow rating will grow in response.
There's only one problem — the extra weight of passengers, cargo and options matters even if they're not part of the trailer. The engine and transmission cooling systems can only handle so much weight and heat and these components don't know or care if that weight is in the truck or trailer.
The Result
With the possibility that implementing J2807 would reduce tow ratings, most manufacturers chickened out. When the 2013 model year rolled around, Toyota was the only manufacturer that had fully embraced the new towing capacity testing procedures. It currently lists J2807-derived tow ratings for the Tundra while the pickup segment's big dogs, Chrysler, Ford and General Motors, all refuse to dive into the pool and cede tow-rating valor.
Ford spokesman Mike Levine said that his company's reading of J2807 is that it should be applied in 2013 or after when a vehicle is all-new or significantly reengineered. As an example he said the new-generation 2013 Escape crossover's tow rating was derived under the SAE standard. Ditto for the 2013 Flex and even the 2013 Fusion midsize sedan.
Critically — and conveniently — that interpretation leaves a pickup-size loophole for Ford's market-dominating F-Series pickup line. The F-Series isn't due for a redesign until 2015 and Ford doesn't intend to deal with the likely lower SAE-generated tow ratings for the next-generation F-Series until it absolutely must.
The 2014 Chevrolet Silverado, launching this summer, is all-new and seemingly would be the poster child for J2807 applicability. But at a media drive event for the new pickup, Chevrolet engineers flatly told Edmunds that the new Silverado's tow ratings were not derived via the new SAE standard. GM sources have said elsewhere the company won't fall in line with the new standard until others automakers begin reporting J2807-compliant tow ratings.
A spokesman for Chrysler presented us with a succinct summation of the company's position regarding the Ram pickup line: "When the market leaders adopt J2807, Ram will as well."
In this theater of the absurd, the Big Three are all fighting for the lead role.
What's a Buyer To Do?
If tow ratings — standardized and comparable tow ratings — are important to you, right now there are a few options.
As mentioned, all of Toyota's light trucks have tow ratings derived under the new standard. Toyota spokesman Sam Butto admits the standard cost most Toyota models, on average, 300 to 400 pounds in tow-rating reduction. The highest tow rating for the Tundra full-size pickup dropped from 10,800 to 10,400 pounds under the new standard, for example. Models such as the Tacoma midsize pickup (max tow: 6,500 pounds) and the Highlander crossover (max tow: 5,000 pounds) were unaffected.
Ford's Levine said the J2807 test procedures are for "more than pickup trucks," but we all know this brouhaha is totally about pickup trucks.
So it's fairly simple right now: if you're in the market for a pickup and want one with a tow rating generated by the SAE method, the Toyota's Tundra is the only model complying with the new standard — and its tow rating subsequently is not the highest you'll find.
If you want a Chrysler, Ford or GM full-size pickup truck rated under the new towing standard, it appears you'd have to wait until 2015 when Ford launches the new-generation F-Series. That's assuming the three companies stick to their positions and all bite the reality bullet at the same time.
Until then, it's best to continue to view tow ratings skeptically, particularly when comparison-shopping.
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Old 01-30-2014, 06:58 AM   #8
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What do the trucks towing specs tell you? Having an adequate tow vehicle is the owners legal responsibility.
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Old 01-31-2014, 09:56 AM   #9
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As mentioned, all of Toyota's light trucks have tow ratings derived under the new standard. Toyota spokesman Sam Butto admits the standard cost most Toyota models, on average, 300 to 400 pounds in tow-rating reduction. The highest tow rating for the Tundra full-size pickup dropped from 10,800 to 10,400 pounds under the new standard, for example.
Big deal! Whether calculated under the new standard or the old, "tow ratings" are all overstated. They're designed to appeal to the low-information buyer who doesn't take the trouble to learn the real trailer weight limits his truck can safely tow without exceeding ANY of the weight ratings.

Tow ratings are calculated as GCWR minus the shipping weight of the empty truck with no options other than those stated in the GCWR - engine, tranny, and rear axle ratio. The tow rating ignores the most likely limiter of trailer weight for any tow vehicle with single rear wheels (SRW) - hitch weight, not trailer weight - the GVWR minus the actual weight of the truck = the net payload capacity available for hitch weight.

Those Toyota pickups, even though they are rated under the new standard, cannot tow a travel trailer (TT) that weighs even close to 10,000 pounds without exceeding the GVWR of the pickup. So in the real world, a tow rating of 10,400 or 10,800 makes no difference - they are both overstated.

That's not to pick on Toyota. GM, Ford and RAM all have the same problem - hitch weight, not trailer weight, is the limiter on how heavy a trailer they can tow with a half-ton pickup without being overloaded. And so all of their tow ratings are overstated.

My half-ton pickup has a "tow rating" of 8,400 pounds, but it's overloaded with a small TT that grosses only 4,870 pounds. So I'd be a fool to think I could drag a TT that weighed 8,400 pounds without being overloaded.

My '99.5 F-250 diesel had a tow rating of 13,500 pounds, but it was overloaded with a 5er that grossed 8,000 pounds. So I'd have to be a blithering idiot to think I could drag a TT that weighed 13,500 pounds without being overloaded.

Can those trucks pull their tow rating? Yes. The GCWR and tow rating tells how heavy a trailer you can tow without overheating anything in the drivetrain and without being the slowpoke blocking traffic on a steep hill or mountain pass. But any SRW truck loaded with that heavy a trailer will exceed the weight limits of the suspension of the tow vehicle. Not a wise move if you expect to arrive safely

So word to the wise of those considering an SRW pickup as a tow vehicle - ignore the tow ratings and GCWR and worry about the net payload capacity of your tow vehicle compared to the hitch weight of the wet and loaded trailer. When estimating hitch weight, use 15% of the GVWR of any TT, and 20% of the GVWR of any 5er.
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Old 01-31-2014, 11:02 AM   #10
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Unless your towing a small travel trailer with a significant margin for safety, then no one here is going to be able to tell you it's OK without actual weights.

You can find a certified scale at most of the larger truck stops. Use the link below to find one. CAT Scale Locator | CAT Scale

Then you need to weigh the setup to see for sure. However, if you didn't buy the TT yet, then it's really a guessing game.

Also the 33ft size is a bit of a concern. I personally wouldn't pull one that long without a hensley or propride hitch, or a 3/4 ton pickup. But i know many people still do it with a half-ton, it's just not for me. I like to feel fully in control at all times.
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Old 02-03-2014, 09:59 PM   #11
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A 1/2 ton truck can tow a flat trailer with iron rods that weigh 8,000lbs a lot easier than a 33' camping trailer that will catch the wind. Every passing semi will cause a need for two steering corrections. As the semi passes you will be sucked toward the semi, as the semi gets past, you will be pushed away.

A 1/2 ton truck can tow a 33' camping trailer at 40mph fine. But as you increase speed to 50 or 60 or 65 at some point things will get white knuckled until you slow down.

Notice how many 1/2 ton trucks towing a camping trailer stay in the right lane doing 55mph. That should tell you what you something.

Good luck
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Old 02-04-2014, 07:33 AM   #12
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I have a 2010 Tundra 2wd 5.7 towing package. Is this vehicle big enough to pull 33 ft prowler 6700lbs?
I tow a 6,900 lb. (dry weight) TT with my 2011 Tundra with no problems.
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Old 02-04-2014, 12:15 PM   #13
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arveer, why do you tell us the dry weight. This number is pretty much meaningless as for what you are really towing.

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Old 02-04-2014, 07:03 PM   #14
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Big deal! Whether calculated under the new standard or the old, "tow ratings" are all overstated. They're designed to appeal to the low-information buyer who doesn't take the trouble to learn the real trailer weight limits his truck can safely tow without exceeding ANY of the weight ratings
I kind of disagree...By trade I'm not a engineer, just a RVer...I'm not going to enroll in a engineering class and test trucks out to determine what each will do / tow. I just want to buy something that will tow my RV (safely). That is why the J2807 towing standard hit a note with me in my choice in what I bought. But I will have to agree, that there are many out there towing Way More RV than their 1/2 or 3/4 ton trucks should be expected to do.

"The first thing the guideline (J2807) does is make sure everyone is on the same page. There are three categories within the J2807 spec, and they include tow vehicles under 8,500 pounds, greater than 8,500 pounds, and chassis cabs. The vehicles selected for testing from each manufacturer have to have the same level of options and carry two 150-pound passengers. For the last two categories, 100 pounds are added evenly between the axles. The standard even goes so far as describing the trailer used for the test-including the brand, tire pressure, AC on high, frontal area, and options."
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