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Old 04-28-2015, 09:33 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by caissiel View Post
Forget the axle capacity. The tires and springs will get overloaded before the axle. A floating axle is never a loading problem with SRW truck.
No. Here's a good explanation of GAWR:

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GAWR (Gross Axle Weight Rating) is the maximum allowable weight each axle assembly is designed to carry, as measured at the tires, including the weight of the axle assembly itself. The GAWR is specified by the vehicle manufacturer. It is established by considering the rating of each of its components (tires, wheels, springs, axle), and rating the axle on its weakest link.
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Old 04-28-2015, 04:41 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by caissiel View Post
Forget the axle capacity. The tires and springs will get overloaded before the axle. A floating axle is never a loading problem with SRW truck.
The axle capacity and the gross axle weight rating (GAWR) are two different things. The rear GAWR considers the frame, tires, springs, shocks, and wheels as well as the rear axle. The rear axle includes all the parts of the "third member", including differential, axle shafts, wheel bearings and other bearings, and other parts of the rear "axle". If you never exceed the rear GAWR, then you'll never exceed the capacity of the rear axle.
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Old 04-28-2015, 06:01 PM   #17
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The rear GAWR is 6100 lbs.,The tire load capacity of one tire is 3750 Range E ,The weight by scale one side under tire is 1,220.I would think if I times that by 2,the total weight of the load on the unloaded truck axle would be 2,440lbs. If I take the 6,100lbs. (GAWR) and deduct the 2,440lbs. I would now have 4,660 lbs. available. The timbren SES can carry a load of 6,000lbs.,helping with sway and load weight.
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Old 04-28-2015, 06:06 PM   #18
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The rear GAWR is 6100 lbs.,The tire load capacity of one tire is 3750 Range E ,The weight by scale one side under tire is 1,220.I would think if I times that by 2,the total weight of the load on the unloaded truck axle would be 2,440lbs. If I take the 6,100lbs. (GAWR) and deduct the 2,440lbs. I would now have 4,660 lbs. available. The timbren SES can carry a load of 6,000lbs.,helping with sway and load weight.
Sounds to me like you're good-to-go.

But next time you go by a CAT scale, I would double check just to be sure. They are very cheap. Usually about $12 for the first weigh, and $3 foa any additional weighs.
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Old 04-28-2015, 06:11 PM   #19
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I definately will use a cat scale down the road. I think i have solved the puzzle of pulling a TT weighing 10,930lbs.,tongue weight 1,800lbs with a F250,6.2 L engine, With a new class V tow receiver carries 2,550lbs and TT of 17,000lbs.,Timbren SES carries 6,000lbs., Rear GAWR of 6,100lbs.and WDH that tows 14,000lbs. To all that helped me get here Thankyou.
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Old 04-28-2015, 07:22 PM   #20
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Skyline check your math, it would leave you 3,660lbs


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Old 04-28-2015, 07:33 PM   #21
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The rear end and diff of the f250 and f350 are not the same.

That being said, you should be able to visit a scrap yard and pull the class V hitch off an F350. Some F250 also have it (rated to tow 14000lbs). I was surprised by the class IV hitch on mine, if I had found one I would have bought a 6.2L with the 4.1 gears which has the class 5 hitch.... Still, I'm happy towing 7000lbs, I've got tons of available payload for a dirtbike, generator, etc in the bed.
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Old 04-28-2015, 09:13 PM   #22
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Lol you're right 6100-the correct amount 2440lbs equals 3660 available. I was revved up after I weighed the truck.
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Old 04-28-2015, 09:21 PM   #23
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The rear end and diff of the f250 and f350 are not the same.

That being said, you should be able to visit a scrap yard and pull the class V hitch off an F350. Some F250 also have it (rated to tow 14000lbs). I was surprised by the class IV hitch on mine, if I had found one I would have bought a 6.2L with the 4.1 gears which has the class 5 hitch.... Still, I'm happy towing 7000lbs, I've got tons of available payload for a dirtbike, generator, etc in the bed.
well that depends.i looked at the Ford tow chart and some F350 have the 3.73 w/ the 6.2L . I bought a new Curt hitch, rated 2,550 tongue,17,000 trailer.the Timbrens should support the springs and sway.i do realize the 6.2L is going to work a little harder.
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Old 04-28-2015, 09:38 PM   #24
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Unless you take the ashtray out and slip it into a 350 or 450 you will still have a 250 with 250 limitations according to the Ford information I have read.
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Old 05-02-2015, 08:07 PM   #25
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Unless you take the ashtray out and slip it into a 350 or 450 you will still have a 250 with 250 limitations according to the Ford information I have read.
But that F250 still will tow 12,400lbs and the trailers weight is 10,930lbs well unless I add that ashtray...lol
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Old 05-02-2015, 08:40 PM   #26
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Skyline check your math, it would leave you 3,660lbs


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Skyline - I'm late to this discussion, but I think your rear axle weight measurement is wrong. In your first post your truck weighs 7040 lbs. If your rear axle only has 2440 lbs on it, your front axle is carrying 4600 lbs! Nearly double the weight on the rear. That seems awfully high for a gas engine truck IMO.
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Old 05-03-2015, 12:40 AM   #27
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Skyline - I'm late to this discussion, but I think your rear axle weight measurement is wrong. In your first post your truck weighs 7040 lbs. If your rear axle only has 2440 lbs on it, your front axle is carrying 4600 lbs! Nearly double the weight on the rear. That seems awfully high for a gas engine truck IMO.
Front GAWR 5600,rear GAWR 6100 GVWR 10,000. I weighed truck on scale it weighed 7040 per scale slip with me in it.
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Old 05-03-2015, 08:05 AM   #28
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But that F250 still will tow 12,400lbs and the trailers weight is 10,930lbs well unless I add that ashtray...lol
That 12,400 pound tow rating is a myth. It can tow that much trailer without being overloaded only if it has absolutely no options and nothing in the truck but a skinny driver.

Don't confuse the weight it can pull (based on the GCWR) with the hitch weight it can haul (based on the GVWR) without being overloaded.

Most trucks can pull a lot more weight than they can haul the hitch weight of that trailer. My F-250 diesel had a tow rating of over 13,000 pounds, but it was overloaded with my 8,000-pound 5er. My little F-150 can tow 8,400 pounds without straining, but hitch weight of my 5.000-pound TT overloads the truck's suspension.

Use your brains and read the fine print about tow ratings, Ford. GM, and Ram all say in the fine print with their tow ratings that you should never exceed either the GCWR or the GVWR of your truck. The tow ratings are based on the GCWR, but 99.9% of folks will exceed the GVWR of the truck long before they get up to the trailer weight of the tow rating - because their truck has options, and they haul more in the truck than a skinny driver.

The proof in the pudding is the CAT scale. When you cross the scale with your wet and loaded rig, the first weight to check is the GVW (combined weight on the front and rear axles of the tow vehicle). If your GVW doesn't exceed the GVWR, then you probably won't exceed any other weight limitations either.
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