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Old 12-26-2013, 06:28 PM   #1
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What size TT to get

I have af-150 but I am concerned with what size TT to get,because I want to travel across county don't want a 30footer.I was thinking a 21 foot Minnie winnegabo .Any coments
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Old 12-26-2013, 07:14 PM   #2
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What are the specs of your ford? We've got a 23ft TT with 2 bunks. If its just two people that would be fine but more than that it'll get tight fast. If its the 2101 models then it'll probably weight 5k loaded so pretty much any f150 can pull it. Ours is 5k loaded and we pull it with a 2005 buick rainier with the 5.3v8 and we get anywhere from 8-13mpg depending on wind and road conditions so take that into account when planning your CC trip. If you want or need any better mpg then consider any ultra light TTs like a Nomad 186. However they are not as cool as the minnie winnies!
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Old 12-26-2013, 07:18 PM   #3
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The 21' Mini Winni should be no problem for the F-150. It will tow easy enough as not to make the towing a task. 21' will not catch to much air vortex as Tractor Trailers pass.

Actually you should be able to keep ahead on most of those Semi's.

Sounds like a great trip...enjoy.
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Old 12-26-2013, 07:20 PM   #4
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Shorter is definitely better than longer for handling, maneuvering, getting into small sites, etc. We went from a 20' TT to a 29' TT and I found it's been a big difference. Around 21' is a nice size. Length has little to do with mpg but shorter is better for less sway.

But it's not just the length of the TT, weight is an important factor. The first thing you should do is assess your towing capacity and payload capacity. What are the specs on your F150? It's a good idea to take your truck to a scale and subtract that wt. from the GVWR on the door jamb sticker to get the actual payload capacity. Factory options on the truck will reduce the sticker amount.

Don't use dry weights of trailers for making a buying decision, but at 21' you are probably okay as long as you don't have a V6. As a very rough rule of thumb, you can take the tow capacity of the truck and multiply that by 80% to come up with the max. wt. of trailer when looking at different units. Unless you know for certain what the actual weight (not dry, aka UVW) is going to be, use the GVWR to be safe. That's the number your trailer should never exceed. You can easily add 1000 - 1500 of total cargo on top of the factory dry wt. Our 20' TT ended being 1500 lbs higher.

Looking at the Winnie 2101 FBS or DS, the GVWR is listed at 7460 lbs. Seems a bit high for a TT that length when they call it a lightweight. Typically a 1/2T truck is good up to around 6,000 - 7,000 lbs unless it has a HD tow package option. You do not want to be towing near the max. tow rating as you can end up really slow on hills and it can be slow accelerating. Tongue wt. is usually in the 10-15% range and if you apply that to the Minnie GVWR, you *could* have an actual tongue wt. up around 1000 lbs. The wt. of passengers, cargo, pets, camping gear, etc. can add something like 400-500 lbs so you could potentially be up around 1500 lbs of total payload and that might be too much for your particular F150. Better to think about weights and investigate it beforehand than get a surprise after you've bought your unit.

By comparison, our old 20' TT had a GVWR of 5,000 lbs, but did not have a slide. A slide in a shorter TT is a really good idea. I see that the two 21' Minnie models (actually 21'-11") are 7-6" wide and are narrower than the average TT. I think you may find that that extra 6" of width makes a big difference. I would not settle for any unit that does not have a sofa or easy chairs in it.

Besides doing your due diligence on things like quality, also look into the dealer's "quality". A bad dealer can turn a great unit into a nightmare.

When looking at different makes and models, just be wary of anything called "ultra-lite" because it means that overall things are less substantially built and are less durable in the long run.

FWIW, that's my 2 cents for a boxing day...
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Old 12-26-2013, 09:44 PM   #5
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Caveat. My 2012 SuperCrew EcoBoost 4x2 with 6.5' bed is overloaded with my 19.5' (box length) TT that grosses only 4,870 pounds when wet and loaded on the road. GVWR is 5,600, so it's lightly loaded. So unless your F-150 has at least the Max Tow pkg with GVWR over 7,500 pounds, the Minnie Winnie with a 21 in the model number (24' length tip to tail) will probably overload your F-150 when wet and loaded on the road. The Model 2101 DS has GVWR of 7,460. A SuperCrew 4x4 should have the HD Payload pkg to tow that TT without being overloaded. You might get by with the Max Tow pkg, but without at least the GVWR of the Max Tow Pkg, you'll probably be overloaded.
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Old 12-26-2013, 10:31 PM   #6
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[QUOTE=SmokeyWren;1859017] My 2012 SuperCrew EcoBoost 4x2 with 6.5' bed is overloaded with my 19.5' (box length) TT that grosses only 4,870 pounds when wet and loaded on the road. GVWR is 5,600, so it's lightly loaded.[QUOTE]

Yet when you look at Ford's spec's (for a 2014 anyway) they show a basic F150 EB being good for 2060 lbs payload and 9800 lbs towing and 7050 GVWR. How is the un-informed, non-expert, newbie supposed to make sense of all this? And in reality, you can pretty much go by their towing figures but not payload figures. It's bad enough trying to come to grips with trailer dry weights.

2014 Ford F-150 | View Payload Specifications | Ford.com
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Old 12-27-2013, 12:18 AM   #7
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Need more info on your truck.
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Old 12-27-2013, 12:09 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by myredracer View Post
How is the un-informed, non-expert, newbie supposed to make sense of all this?
Become informed before you spend the money.

Realize that any weights in the specs are based on a tow vehicle with absolutely nothing in the truck but a skinny driver. Ignore the GCWR and "tow rating" because they are wet dreams that you cannot achieve without exceeding the GVWR. The GVWR is the limiter on an F-150 when working on the specs for a tandem-axle travel trailer (TT).

Weigh the wet and loaded F-150 set up ready to tow, with passengers, pets, toolbox, full tank of gas, options such as bed rug, bed lining, etc. Include the hitch weight. If the hitch is not yet available, assume 50# for the WD hitch parts that will be part of the pickup weight. Subtract the weight of the wet and loaded pickup from the GVWR to determine maximum hitch weight. Divide that max hitch weight by 15% to determine the max GVWR of any TT you want to consider. And maximum means exactly that - maximum. Try to stay 20% below maximum if you want to be safe and happy on the road.

NEVER use dry weights or curb weights, then try to add weight of people and other cargo to determine the actual weight of your tow vehicle (TV) or trailer. That's a sure-fire way to wind up overloaded when on the road in the middle of your third RV trip.

Rough estimate of a TT weight you can tow without being overloaded, and without having to have actual scale weights? GCWR minus GVWR of the TV, then reduce that answer by 20%. For example, my pickup has GCWR of 14,000 and GVWR of 7,100. That leaves 6,900 pounds, minus 20% = 5,465 pounds for max trailer weight. So I used that formula when ordering my F-150 and TT. But that rough estimate resulted in too much trailer weight for my actual trailer and conditions. As a result, I'm 100 pounds over the GVWR of my truck when wet and loaded on the road with my TT that weighs only 4,870 pounds wet and loaded.

I had the 8,400 pounds "tow rating" in the back of my mind, and thought "surely that truck can tow my 7,000 pounds cargo trailer without being overloaded". Well, hindsight says I was wrong. Since my 4,870 pound TT overloads my TV, then that 7,000 pounds cargo trailer will put me way over the TV's limit if I load it up to the trailer's 7,000-pound weight limit.
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