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Old 11-19-2012, 11:40 AM   #85
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4runner Pulling out RV - YouTube

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Old 11-19-2012, 12:22 PM   #86
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Unless we settle for a 90 day season up here we're going to drive into or out of some undesirable weather. Some of our passes require you to chain up unless you have 4WD, whether you're towing or not.

I often don't get the last five miles to home without 4WD, and when towing it's even more often. There are things besides TTs and 5ers that are towed all year around, like horse trailers and snowmobiles, etc.

As for what we got by with 40 years ago, .

Postranger's post could be rewritten with the mountains as the subject. Folks follow their GPSs right into ORV forest roads in their Buicks and don't make it out. Flatlanders will head up a beautiful mountain trail on a beautiful mountain morning in their $70 hiking shorts and $300 hiking boots, neither of which help when the blizzard hits them a couple hours later. Keeps our Search & Rescue crews busy. Unfortunately, they sometimes end up in recovery mode.

But back on the subject. Buy what you want and/or think you need. You know what's best for you, or will learn soon enough if you're wrong.
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Old 11-19-2012, 10:13 PM   #87
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Jeeze I thought we were talking about 4x4 trucks not survival training

Some of us are not as dumb as some perceive us as and
just use common sense and our 4x4 to tour around ...

back in the day I too did the moab stuff too and motocross and trials and....
but assume that most here know their own limits...
Sounds like you're taking it personally JohnBoy

Yeah, and most of us here have been there and done that. But what about the new guy who's driven his Jeep at home and now has chance to go to Maob or half a dozen other places. I'll post elsewhere about survival but one key to survival is your 4x and being able to drive it to it's limits in 2WD. That's the passing grade, as far as you can go and get back in 2WD.

I digress, 4 wheel drive it is. And the limits. One of my old truck builds was a 1971 Chevy C-10 with a powered up 350 <insert specs carb, dual point igl, etc> sitting on a miled lift with kind of a low ride rate. Tall but a bit springy and Rancho 4000 shocks. The rear end was a posi-traction geared at 3:73. The tires were 35x12.50 R16s Used mostly as a work truck it had a small compressor and a welder in back. All in the thing weighed 4,500. I've pulled more people out of the desert in that truck than any other single truck I've ever owned except for an overworked 1990 Ford Bronco. It's a question of technique when the hubs fail or when a u-joint breaks. Helps if you have the tools and know how to remove the bad shaft. How many of us know that one? How many of us can do it?

Look closely at the picture of the Hummer. Look underneath, is that a diff housing and axle? Funny, that's not how a hummer is suspended. It another one of our builds a converted 1979 Suburban chassis, the big one with a hummer kit. Lifted and put on monster tires with an upgraded suspension and horsepower to carry 12 passengers with some excitement.

Thing is a there's a large number of us that have a lot of experience off road in different environments and we're prett good at it good it because we've been doing it a long time; right? Work that snow and ice, mud and bog. Only...

it's not desert. Snow and mud after flooding have a bottom, it's called a road. No such thing under sand. Another thing, sand is worse than salt for your car because it get's in everywhere and is almost impossible to get rid of. I use top grade filters for everything and oil is double filtered. DaveShan said it, "Don't go alone." He's right yet a lot of people do that including myself.

For me it's at a place in Joshua Tree National Park called Pinto Basin. Going out there alone is a spiritual experience day or night regardless of time of year.

There are no recorded records of anyone ever walking out of the Basin after breaking down. The most recent was a couple in the Summer of 2011. I go there on a whim and nobody knows I'm there. If I'm heading to 29 Palms on guisoness I'm in a Lexus Rx300. Those are all major 4x rule breakers everywhere right there. I've also rescued several Cruise America RVs and a Super C once from there and the Wilson Canyon areas in the summer when I'm alone. Temps in the eleventy-hundreds and people drive overloaded through the desert every year.

Somebody said "This is not about survival, it's about 4xs"

We RVer's are a group of people who make plans to go here and see this then do go there and do that. Life is when we make plans.

Survival is when those plans change.

On the road or off.
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Old 11-19-2012, 11:29 PM   #88
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I think we've strayed a bit off-topic...Unless I misinterpreted his post, the O.P. wasn't asking about why folks have toys, but why folks choose 4x4 trucks over 2WD for towing/daily driver duty.
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Old 11-20-2012, 09:01 AM   #89
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That video of the 4 runner hauling the RV out is why. I've spent too much time knowing what I can do with a 4x4 and using it to help people to want to drive anything else if given a choice.

I'm pretty sure that video was taken near Palm Springs CA. I recognize the mouintains.
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:15 AM   #90
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Even with my little trailer I have used the 4 wheel drive capability of my RAV4 more than once. While a long way from a 4X4 truck, sure helps on pulling out on wet grass, etc.

As to a truck, it is probably in the future - the RAV4 doesn't do jeep trails all that well!
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:16 AM   #91
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4x4

All the survivorman type discussions aside--most people get a 4x4 because they want one-not that they really need one--simple as that--but they do come in handy occasionally---Vince Western N.C.--no deserts around -a little snow."Different strokes for different folks and so on and so on and scoobie doobie do-obie". Good info to think about though if you"re ever around these kinds of areas(and I hope to one day)
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Old 11-21-2012, 04:00 PM   #92
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A diesel IMO is to heavy up front and will not perform well in soft ground or grass. I see to many CG lots damaged by spinning wheels after a big rain. Most trailers do not have enough weight on the rear wheels for enough traction to tow the trailer weight on the tires in soft ground.
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Old 11-21-2012, 04:19 PM   #93
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A diesel IMO is to heavy up front and will not perform well in soft ground or grass. I see to many CG lots damaged by spinning wheels after a big rain. Most trailers do not have enough weight on the rear wheels for enough traction to tow the trailer weight on the tires in soft ground.


Most trailers don't have "traction" at the rear wheels...or any other wheels!
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Old 11-22-2012, 08:32 AM   #94
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Francesca, "Most trailers don't have "traction" at the rear wheels...or any other wheels!"

But chains can be required on trailers when they are required on the TV. I think California has laws regarding them. Colorado does not, but the rules state tire cables are okay on trailers. Colorado rules refer to commercial vehicles, but our trailers will react in a manner similar to a tractor trailer combo, so I have been thinking of buying a pair for the rear axle before leaving home in December.
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Old 11-22-2012, 09:12 AM   #95
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Drag chains for trailers are a long way from the original topic of this thread, but so be it, I guess since that horse was beaten to death pages ago......

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Old 11-22-2012, 11:07 AM   #96
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Most trailers don't have "traction" at the rear wheels...or any other wheels!
This is also off topic. The way I read caissiel's post was that he was referring to the rear wheels of the TV. As for trailer tires having no traction (also called resistance) you could pull the trailer out like it wasn't there. Also if a tire doesn't have traction when braking it will just slide. (such as on ice).
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Old 11-22-2012, 11:26 PM   #97
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A diesel IMO is to heavy up front and will not perform well in soft ground or grass. I see to many CG lots damaged by spinning wheels after a big rain. Most trucks do not have enough weight on the rear wheels for enough traction to tow the trailer weight on the tires in soft ground.
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Old 11-23-2012, 12:34 PM   #98
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Noted...and that brings us very neatly back on topic: Why folks choose 4x4

Yours is a real good example...

The traction provided by a 4x4's front wheels in that wet/soft campground surface situation is a real bonus. And it's a situation probably encountered a lot more often by RVers than a thirty degree shale slope!
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