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Old 08-10-2016, 10:49 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by joshuajim View Post
In most cases the front tire load decreases when hooking up a bumper tow trailer. I would not increase tire pressure.
Does the weight distribution hitch change that dynamic?
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Old 08-10-2016, 11:19 AM   #16
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Does the weight distribution hitch change that dynamic?
Think about it. When you load the ball, the front end rises. When you add the WD in the front end comes down some, usually not to the original height.

A higher front end indicates less load.
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Old 08-10-2016, 11:20 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by dexters View Post
Does the weight distribution hitch change that dynamic?
Yes.........
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Old 08-19-2016, 12:27 AM   #18
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Toyo tires has a website that lists tire pressure requirements for all size tires based on load. The only way to determine pressure is to weigh each axle and then check the tables for recommended pressure for that amount. Add 5 or 10 pounds extra if it makes you feel better.
If anyone wants to ride around town with tires at 75 lbs great. It makes no sense.
The Toyo site will clear up all the misinformation.
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Old 08-20-2016, 09:47 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by 09 harley View Post
Toyo tires has a website that lists tire pressure requirements for all size tires based on load. The only way to determine pressure is to weigh each axle and then check the tables for recommended pressure for that amount. Add 5 or 10 pounds extra if it makes you feel better.
If anyone wants to ride around town with tires at 75 lbs great. It makes no sense.
The Toyo site will clear up all the misinformation.
Toyo does not recommend tire inflation to match the load carried. Here is a reference that is very informative about Toyo's tire inflation policy, which, by the way, follows tire industry standards.

https://toyotires2-1524598101.netdna...ire_safety.pdf

Toyo has referenced FMVSS 571.120 in the above document. Once they did that they automatically included RV trailer tires and any other tires istalled/fitted using that regulation including applicable LT tires.
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Old 08-20-2016, 08:46 PM   #20
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The TPMS settings can be changed. My dealer was willing to adjust mine. Here is the process.

This works for the 2014+ and on any model. You will have to have this done at a dealer. Print this and take it in and they should be able to change your settings and turn off the light. It takes about 10 minutes.

Step 1: Go into the BCM (body control module). Go to "miscellaneous functions". Go to "update pressure thresholds". Set pressure to desired settings. Do not try to do different pressures front and back! Even if you run 10 psi difference front to back you won't get a light. If you plan to run 10 psi difference I suggest your "setting" be in the middle of the high and low just to give you a little cushion.

Step 2: Go into the RFH (radio frequency hub). Go to "miscellaneous functions". Perform "RFH replace" and follow prompts. You will need the PIN number for the truck. That can be obtained through Dealer Connect with the vin number to the truck. When following the prompts - when asked for desired pressure setting - set new pressure levels. You do not need to replace anything - just perform the function to set new levels.

I have not had to drive the truck - once the RFH replace function is done the light goes out and the truck is reading new pressures.
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Old 08-23-2016, 10:51 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by joshuajim View Post
In most cases the front tire load decreases when hooking up a bumper tow trailer. I would not increase tire pressure.
Correct on bumper pulls but my 5th wheel had the same weight loaded or empty per cat scales.My front end weighed 5560 with 5th wheel on and 5560 with 5th wheel off. My sticker on truck says 80 psi front and 65 psi rear. I run 80 psi in front and 70 psi in rear. My tires are good for 3085 pounds each and i have 2780 pounds of weight per tire loaded or empty so i have 305 pounds of safety per tire at 80 psi. If you don't weigh then you don't know. When traveling, my front tires are always hotter than any other tires on truck or trailer. Be Safe.
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Old 08-23-2016, 05:51 PM   #22
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My front tires are also hotter probably due to engine heat. I did the Smartweigh @ Escapees and my fifth wheel moves 100# off right front and 50# off left front. Weigh master stated that was actually better than some-they've seen 400 moved back from bad hitch location. This by the way was a crew cab long bed. YMMV


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Old 08-24-2016, 04:52 PM   #23
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Toyo does not recommend tire inflation to match the load carried. Here is a reference that is very informative about Toyo's tire inflation policy, which, by the way, follows tire industry standards.

https://toyotires2-1524598101.netdna...ire_safety.pdf

Toyo has referenced FMVSS 571.120 in the above document. Once they did that they automatically included RV trailer tires and any other tires istalled/fitted using that regulation including applicable LT tires.
If you want to run max pressure then go ahead and do it. It makes no sense but that's fine. When you tow you increase pressure and add extra to up your capacity for a safety allowance.
I'm not going to run 80 lbs in my van when it is empty. I would fly off the seat on speed bumps. And you think that the manufacturer is telling you that this is the only safe procedure? I prefer to use my God given intelligence and not just follow a procedure that is meant to protect the auto companies. If they or the tire companies gave you any leeway then when there was an accident they would merely claim that it was your fault because you didn't have max pressure. This nonsense is purely to protect them. Let's think for ourselves.
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Old 08-24-2016, 11:07 PM   #24
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If you want to run max pressure then go ahead and do it. It makes no sense but that's fine. When you tow you increase pressure and add extra to up your capacity for a safety allowance.
I'm not going to run 80 lbs in my van when it is empty. I would fly off the seat on speed bumps. And you think that the manufacturer is telling you that this is the only safe procedure? I prefer to use my God given intelligence and not just follow a procedure that is meant to protect the auto companies. If they or the tire companies gave you any leeway then when there was an accident they would merely claim that it was your fault because you didn't have max pressure. This nonsense is purely to protect them. Let's think for ourselves.
I recommend you read the safety standards used for fitting the original tires to your vehicle. It will give you a better understanding of how and why your particular recommended tire inflation pressures were established. Within those standards you will find the differences between inflation pressures for automotive fitments as opposed to those for fixed axle RV trailer fitments.

The standards most pertinent for this subject are FMVSS 571.109 - 571.110 - 571.119 - 571.120 and 571.139. Some of those will refer you to CFR 49 part 567 (certification ).

Tire industry standards pretty much follow the lead of the vehicle manufacturers because they are solely responsible for all initial tire fitments and their recommended inflation pressures. Just pick a tire manufacturer and read their version of the industry standards as they apply them.
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Old 08-26-2016, 09:26 AM   #25
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I recommend you read the safety standards used for fitting the original tires to your vehicle. It will give you a better understanding of how and why your particular recommended tire inflation pressures were established. Within those standards you will find the differences between inflation pressures for automotive fitments as opposed to those for fixed axle RV trailer fitments.

The standards most pertinent for this subject are FMVSS 571.109 - 571.110 - 571.119 - 571.120 and 571.139. Some of those will refer you to CFR 49 part 567 (certification ).

Tire industry standards pretty much follow the lead of the vehicle manufacturers because they are solely responsible for all initial tire fitments and their recommended inflation pressures. Just pick a tire manufacturer and read their version of the industry standards as they apply them.
Let's get back to reality. The original question was why the high pressure recommendations for the tires on your tow vehicle. It had nothing to do with what you are towing. You can throw around all the standards and rule numbers you want. It's nonsense. The pressure for tires on a tow vehicle can be modified to load requirements. Not complicated. If you want to run your tow vehicle with no load at full pressure then go ahead. It doesn't show common sense but go ahead. Do people ever lower their pressure when in sand? According to you and all the rules you follow they are on a path to certain doom and death. Utter nonsense! Do NASCAR teams adjust tires for temperature and loading? Of course they do. I wonder how they stay on the track when you think there sidewalls will collapse and they with go off the track and die in a fiery crash. Utter nonsense.
Some people are capable of thinking for themselves and others need to be told what to do. Some people will take on challenges that are not comfortable and others will follow the pack in safety. My only point is that we should not be so rigid in our thinking because it prevents us from seeing what is right in front of us. Any preacher can spout off but this choir isn't listening!
I always run my trailer at the max pressure but that wasn't the question. You may want to start another thread so what you are saying will be accurate. I hate to see threads hijacked and taken down a path that doesn't address the original question but tries to prove a point about another question that wasn't asked and isn't relevant to the original post.
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Old 08-26-2016, 10:25 AM   #26
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Let's get back to reality. The original question was why the high pressure recommendations for the tires on your tow vehicle. It had nothing to do with what you are towing. You can throw around all the standards and rule numbers you want. It's nonsense. The pressure for tires on a tow vehicle can be modified to load requirements.
The standards I previously quoted to you provide the answers you're looking for.

The vehicle owner's manual - also a product of those standards - will list exceptions for recommended inflation pressures.

Getting out of snow, icy conditions or any other unusual emergency situations are options for such conditions. Those options can normally be found in such publications as tire data books and publications from organizations such as the Rubber Manufacturer's Association (RMA).

Tire industry standards - those standards tire manufacturers set for themselves - will not, under normal circumstances, recommend using less inflation pressure than that which has been set by vehicle manufacturer.

Do not mingle FMCSA regulations with FMVSS standards, one is not applicable with the other.
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Old 08-26-2016, 11:01 AM   #27
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Some people are capable of thinking for themselves and others need to be told what to do. Some people will take on challenges that are not comfortable and others will follow the pack in safety. My only point is that we should not be so rigid in our thinking because it prevents us from seeing what is right in front of us.
From what I've found out in new vehicles like mine; the driver does not have much leeway when it comes to the tire pressure range - with the computer.

The tire recommendation is 60 in front and 80 in the back. You can lower it about 10-13 psi from the recommendation before the warning light comes on. I'm told the dealer can not change this, while in the past they may have been able to do it.

You could lower the tire pressure and drive with the warning all the time. And it may be possible to remove the sensors and disable the tire pressure monitoring system. I don't know about that.
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Old 08-26-2016, 09:38 PM   #28
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From what I've found out in new vehicles like mine; the driver does not have much leeway when it comes to the tire pressure range - with the computer.

The tire recommendation is 60 in front and 80 in the back. You can lower it about 10-13 psi from the recommendation before the warning light comes on. I'm told the dealer can not change this, while in the past they may have been able to do it.

You could lower the tire pressure and drive with the warning all the time. And it may be possible to remove the sensors and disable the tire pressure monitoring system. I don't know about that.
The dealer can adjust the parameters. See my post #20 for the procedure.
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