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Old 08-18-2012, 04:03 PM   #1
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Max pin weight for short bed truck

Hopefully this hasn't been asked a million times, but how much "realistic" pin weight can a second gen Dodge Ram 3/4 ton accept? Tires are E rated 3500 lbs each too. Hopefully someone has some real world experience with this specific truck. As much as this information is limited by sellers, most trailers so far have pin weight in the range of 2200-2800 lbs. Thank you for any help.
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Old 08-18-2012, 04:18 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by steveatpa View Post
Hopefully this hasn't been asked a million times, but how much "realistic" pin weight can a second gen Dodge Ram 3/4 ton accept? Tires are E rated 3500 lbs each too. Hopefully someone has some real world experience with this specific truck. As much as this information is limited by sellers, most trailers so far have pin weight in the range of 2200-2800 lbs. Thank you for any help.
I don't think it's been asked a million times yet, but it's probably in the high six figures.
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Old 08-18-2012, 05:16 PM   #3
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Weight the truck loaded for travel. Get the GVWR and rear axle GAWR from the sticker on the door jamb.

GVWR - loaded truck = max pin weight for your truck.

There is no magic way to figure it out without the loaded weight of the truck.

Rear GAWR - loaded rear axle weight = what additional load the rear axle can carry.

Now the manufacturers rating simply states that you are not to exceed GCWR, GAWR or GVWR. Some folks on here believe you can exceed one ant that is OK, but that is not how the truck is rated by the manufacturer.

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Old 08-18-2012, 05:22 PM   #4
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Also you should figure at least 20% of trailer GVWR for a realistic pin weight. The sales man may be giving you the pin weight of an empty trailer. Most of us don't tow as empty trailer except to take it home new.
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Old 08-18-2012, 09:22 PM   #5
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My previous truck was a 2nd gen 2500 Dodge/Cummins 4.10 gears 2wd short bed.

The 2nd gen trucks have a 6084 RAWR which will leave around 2500-2700 lbs for a wet pin weight. Your actual numbers will vary. Actual payloads depend on the trucks front and rear seperate axle weights.

Dry pin weights will grow depending on the trailer actual gross weight when its loaded. Not its dry weight or its GVWR but its actual scaled weight. I use the trailers dry weight from the cert sticker then I add 1500 to that number. You may load more or less so do your math from there.
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Old 08-19-2012, 12:14 AM   #6
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Great responses.

So let me ask you all this then..... Given the fact that I'm looking at Toy Haulers, would it change the pin weight much or affect the trailers ability to follow the truck if I was to intently load the rear of the trailer with most heavy items while traveling? Or is that simply not realistic? And does it matter if the trailer is a tandem or triple axle with relation weight transfer?

I know I have lots of questions but I have lots to learn too.
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Old 08-19-2012, 12:35 AM   #7
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Great responses.

So let me ask you all this then..... Given the fact that I'm looking at Toy Haulers, would it change the pin weight much or affect the trailers ability to follow the truck if I was to intently load the rear of the trailer with most heavy items while traveling? Or is that simply not realistic? And does it matter if the trailer is a tandem or triple axle with relation weight transfer?

I know I have lots of questions but I have lots to learn too.
Moving weight behind the axles to reduce pin weight can be a recipe for bad handling.(sway) I hauled a tractor on a 3 axle equipment trailer and I wasn't able to get it past the wheel wells because of wide wheel spacing of rear wheels. When I would get much over 40 the tail would wag the dog. Going 40 on I5 wasn't any fun but I made it. It was about a 100 mile trip. The trailer weighed more than the tractor.
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Old 08-19-2012, 10:03 AM   #8
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A toy hauler will tend to be heavier on the pin when there are not any toys in the back. As you load toys in the back, it will lighten the pin weight. This is OK to a point. You go too light on the pin and you will start seeing a bad effect on the handling. It will tend to act like a see-saw and the up and down will not be comfortable to drive this way.

Again on the issue of GAWR, the manufacturers towing guides specifically state that you are not to exceed GCWR, GVWR or GAWR (not a choice of abiding for one of your choice, but all three). Most tow vehicles you will reach GVWR before you reach GAWR when towing a 5er.

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Old 08-19-2012, 10:29 PM   #9
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Great responses.

So let me ask you all this then..... Given the fact that I'm looking at Toy Haulers, would it change the pin weight much or affect the trailers ability to follow the truck if I was to intently load the rear of the trailer with most heavy items while traveling? Or is that simply not realistic? And does it matter if the trailer is a tandem or triple axle with relation weight transfer?

I know I have lots of questions but I have lots to learn too.
Toy haulers, unlike a regular 5th wheel trailers, are designed for carrying their CCC aft of the rear axles and should have no problems following the truck. And many don't gain a lot of hitch weight after max loading.

Sure a triple axle trailer has better handling manners/superior braking with three axles, but triples tend to be big and heavy. Keep in mind your truck is only a 2500 with those small 6000 lb RAWR/tire capacities for carrying pin weights. Over load a axle (suspension) or tire isn't safe.

Check out RV.net toy haulers forums as its a big forum. Someone may have the same combo and can give you real time experiences. Some of the toy hauler brands even have forums for asking questions. Run a google and check them out.
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Old 08-20-2012, 02:03 AM   #10
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Toy haulers, unlike a regular 5th wheel trailers, are designed for carrying their CCC aft of the rear axles and should have no problems following the truck. And many don't gain a lot of hitch weight after max loading.

Sure a triple axle trailer has better handling manners/superior braking with three axles, but triples tend to be big and heavy. Keep in mind your truck is only a 2500 with those small 6000 lb RAWR/tire capacities for carrying pin weights. Over load a axle (suspension) or tire isn't safe.

Check out RV.net toy haulers forums as its a big forum. Someone may have the same combo and can give you real time experiences. Some of the toy hauler brands even have forums for asking questions. Run a google and check them out.
Thank you for the help. I'll check that forum out.

As for overloading..... I'm not worried about axle or suspension capacity since the manual tranny 2nd gen Dodge 2500 has the same running gear as the 3500 truck. And I also have Timbrens to aid in support. But yes, I still have two less tires for load distribution. In saying that, the E rated tires I have are very strong but with respect to that, four is clearly better than two.
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Old 08-20-2012, 10:14 PM   #11
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Both trucks use the AAM 11.5" rear axle .

BUT.......The difference in the any 2500 Dodge truck with the Cummins and the 3500 SRW/Cummins is the SRW has higher rated tires/wheels (3200 lbs capacity ) and a aux overload spring pack.
The rest on the truck including front axles are the same.

.
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