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Old 03-01-2012, 03:13 PM   #1
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Tieing down a motorcycle for hauling

I am new to a toy hauler 5th wheel. I have really no idea how to tie down my motorcyle in it. Does anyone have some tips for me?
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Old 03-01-2012, 06:50 PM   #2
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We own a 2005 gold wing it weighs close to 1000 lbs. the best way to secure a bike in my opinion is a docking device on the front tire. We use a wing dock and you can find the lower priced tire holders at most motorcycle shops. We then tie the straps to the handles on the seat and tie it forward balanced upright, I then use 2 straps to the floor from the rear crossed to keep it from bouncing side to side. The front tire is secured to the tire dock to keep it up right no kickstands of any kind are used.
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Old 03-01-2012, 07:01 PM   #3
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Have no experience hauling motorcycles with a 5th wheel, but have hauled motorcycles on numerous occasions in trucks, in vans and on seperate trailers. IMO, the most important thing to do is to use HIGH quality tie down straps with quality, heavy duty cinch mechanisms. Use junk...and you WILL pay! Next, be sure to "load" the suspension front and rear to keep the bike from hopping or "pogoing" as the trailer dips and doodles going down the road....this is very important, so don't be afraid to really tug on those straps! Along with loading the suspension, secure the front wheel in a channel or a wheel stop of some sort to keep the front wheel from turning side to side (these are readily available at most m/cycle shops and/or trailer supply shops). Blocking the tires front-to-rear is also critical in a trailer situation to prevent movement....and put the transmission in 1st gear as well. If you can block the sides of the tires, that will help as well. DO NOT rest the bike on either the side stand or center stand when securing it....rest it on the tires and cinch it down securely as mentioned.

The key is to understand that any trailer movement is easily transferred and magnified on its way to the bike, and your bike will move very easily if not heavily secured. Suggest you go to the websites of a couple of good motorcycle magazines and look for articles on the subject as well. I have seen many of these over the years....hope this helps.
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Old 03-01-2012, 07:23 PM   #4
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I disagree with "heavy" cinching.
The key to successful, damage free hauling is a front wheel chock and good anchor points. Chocks range from $35 cheap to $300 expensive. The expensive ones offer options for removal. Anchor points can be maximized with a product called "E track".

Here are some links Buyers 5-Ft. Horizontal E-Track Model# 1903055 | Tie-Down Anchors | Northern Tool + Equipment
Ultra-Tow Motorcycle Wheel Chock | Motorcycle Hauling Accessories | Northern Tool + Equipment

You should secure the bike but dont cinch it down super tight. The quality of the tie downs doesnt matter. Ive seen the heavy duty ones break and cause a mess.
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Old 03-02-2012, 01:21 AM   #5
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"You should secure the bike but dont cinch it down super tight. The quality of the tie downs doesnt matter. Ive seen the heavy duty ones break and cause a mess."[/QUOTE]


Good additional points on securing the bike, particularly the front end. Re cinching and cheap tie downs, my collector bikes and Ducati Superbikes over the years never complained about secure cinching AND expensive tie downs. Happy to say they always made it to the shows and/or the tracks with the shiny sides up and the rubber sides down. But just my experience....
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Old 03-02-2012, 09:02 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeapBigEngin View Post
Good additional points on securing the bike, particularly the front end. Re cinching and cheap tie downs, my collector bikes and Ducati Superbikes over the years never complained about secure cinching AND expensive tie downs. Happy to say they always made it to the shows and/or the tracks with the shiny sides up and the rubber sides down. But just my experience....
I only pointed it out because inexperienced folks tend to get carried away with "over cinching" not to discount your experience. If a handlebar or bracket breaks/bends and its like a "Jack in the box" effect.
I like enough tension to let the bike the bikes suspension absorb some of the bumps and the front wheel secured in a chock. (homemade, metal, wood, etc)
There are a couple of systems out there that dont require any tie downs and are very secure. They cost a few bucks more but well worth the price for damage free hauling.
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Old 03-02-2012, 12:18 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeatherTodd View Post
I only pointed it out because inexperienced folks tend to get carried away with "over cinching" not to discount your experience. If a handlebar or bracket breaks/bends and its like a "Jack in the box" effect.
I like enough tension to let the bike the bikes suspension absorb some of the bumps and the front wheel secured in a chock. (homemade, metal, wood, etc)
There are a couple of systems out there that dont require any tie downs and are very secure. They cost a few bucks more but well worth the price for damage free hauling.

Very good thoughts for sure, especially for "newer" folks. All things in moderation. That the OP is asking is a very good thing. In days gone by, I wish I would've asked about things in certain situations....sure would've save me some money and/or some skin! Take care....
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Old 03-02-2012, 12:31 PM   #8
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DO NOT attach the straps to the handlebars near the grips/controls. You will bend them.

Attach the straps near the fork - where the handlebars attach to the fork.
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Old 03-02-2012, 12:31 PM   #9
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Go to this goldwing forum and do the search for excellent anchoring suggestions.

General MC Message Board
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Old 03-02-2012, 12:42 PM   #10
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Here is what I use along with some good ratcheting tie downs. Don't use the junk pull tight ones.
http://store.condor-lift.com/products.php?product=Pit%252dStop{47}Trailer%252dS top-%26-Trailer-Adaptor-Kit

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Old 03-03-2012, 10:57 AM   #11
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I have a Honda VTX 1300 I use a block of wood under my frame and strap her down and it is solid as a rock.
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Old 03-31-2012, 05:26 AM   #12
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I agree with Pete. I stick a couple of 2x4's under my Road King and cinch the straps down tightly enough that there is no movement.

I have had a problem in the past with the cheap straps pulling out slack while on the road, and let me tell you, it is no fun trying to right a bagger in an enclosed trailer by yourself... I now use a good quality ratchet strap, well over the required capacity.

I will also be installing Ultra-Tow Motorcycle Wheel Chock | Motorcycle Hauling Accessories | Northern Tool + Equipment or a similar wheel chock before my next trip as well. Being a solo-er adds a new aspect to the challenge of strappijng a bike down.
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Old 03-31-2012, 09:19 AM   #13
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And there is always lots of DUCT TAPE......

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Old 03-31-2012, 03:52 PM   #14
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Just to repeat - Don't tie to the handlebars on anything bigger than 250 pounds. In fact don't tie to the handlebars on anything.
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