Go Back   iRV2 Forums > TRAVEL TRAILER, 5th WHEEL & TRUCK CAMPER FORUMS > Travel Trailer Discussion
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-03-2013, 05:56 PM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 31
First off... thanks for taking the time to respond!

The noises are definitely coming from the axles, not the WD hitch. I've had my wife move the truck to determine exactly where it was originating. After doing some research and taking my trailer to the dealer for a look over, I've since found out it's normal. Some are louder than others, but it has to do with only 1 set of wheels pivoting while the other set is being dragged. this causes flexing of the leaf springs and eventually the pressure wins, and the tires/axles return to normal position all while making a huge racket.

As for the surging feeling, I think it is a matter of the trailer riding high and/or not enough tongue weight. (I was using petroleum jelly for ball lubrication.) Would reducing the tension on the bars help at all? I can lower the hitch, but it appears that the increment would be 1" lower, and I'm not sure of this would be too low. I guess I could then increase the tension if it were slightly too low too.

as for the truck power issue, it turns out I should have been using the "tow mode," which I totally forgot about. this apparently allows for more appropriate shifting and rpm for towing. who knew
__________________

__________________
ryguy76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 04-03-2013, 06:21 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Superslif's Avatar
 
Thor Owners Club
Pond Piggies Club
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: NE. Ohio USA
Posts: 4,707
Also check your tire pressure. I was bringing my new 25' tt ( 4300 dry / 5000 loaded ) home last year from a dealer about 2-1/2 hours away. I had them put on and adjust the W-D hitch. I was driving it home dry, and was taking on a bunch of sway. Here I assumed in my prep, they would have checked the tire pressure on the new tt I just purchased. NOT !?!?.. Here one side was 30 PSI and the other two tires on the other side were 50 PSI...I also run my tire pressure on the tow vehicle at 42psi verse 32psi when not towing.

Once I loaded it up for the first trip and filled the tires, it was fine....My old tt was 24' and much lighter on the hitch. This one is much heavier because the side is more towards the front on the tt.

Quote:
I only experienced the chucking of the truck/trailer when the highway joints mis-matched the wheel base of my rig. Or maybe when they matched...I am not sure. I only experienced this about 5% of the time.
Same here. The WV. tollroad does it for me.
__________________

__________________
Jim, Diane & Robert ~ NE. OH.
2018 Outdoors RV Timber Ridge 24 RKS
2014 Toyota Tundra Limited 5.7L
IRV2 Photo Album ~Let's Go Places~
Superslif is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 09:05 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Francesca's Avatar
 
Vintage RV Owners Club
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Port Hadlock, Washington
Posts: 2,855
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryguy76 View Post

As for the surging feeling, I think it is a matter of the trailer riding high and/or not enough tongue weight. (I was using petroleum jelly for ball lubrication.) Would reducing the tension on the bars help at all? I can lower the hitch, but it appears that the increment would be 1" lower, and I'm not sure of this would be too low.
For stability, a little low is much better than a little high. Level is ideal, of course, but not always possible.
__________________
Francesca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2013, 05:43 PM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 31
So before I make any adjustments to the WD system, I'm going to load it and see how she rides once it's packed up as it will be. I think the tongue weight may have been a little light, which could have caused the feeling. we'll see soon.

Now while I've been doing the packing, I've been weighing stuff to see how much weight I'm loading into the TT. We haven't put in food or clothes yet, but almost everything else we can think of, has been loaded into it, and it's about 230lbs total. Most of the weight is upfront in the pass through storage located at the very front of the TT and it's cargo is 200lbs which includes the propane tanks and battery, and that's pretty much it for anything that will be going there. The 70lbs remaining is distributed throughout the TT but mainly in the kitchen cupboards and across from that in the dinette cupboards, with 15lbs in the very back wardrobe.

Here's where it gets tricky for me. I don't have a weigh scale anywhere near my hometown, (closest is 100+ miles away) so I'm relying on sticker weights, and my own weights to determine where I'm at.

The sticker weight of my unit is 4073lbs dry, (funny how the brochure lists it as 3800lbs).

The brochure lists the dry hitch weight at 420lbs, which is what I have to use with no good way to get an accurate weight.

So the 200lbs of weight for the pass through/tanks/battery, I should be able to apply directly to tongue weight, as it's located at the front most portion of the TT for a total of 620Lbs. The little internal added weight isn't enough to make much of a change to this, but we'll load the back wardrobe up to offset this weight to get our tongue weight around 12-13% of the total TT weight.

I dont know where the water tank is physically located, as the underneath of the TT is covered. The 300lbs of water when full, makes me wonder what percent of it will be added to Tongue weight as I'm not sure how it will be distributed throughout the TT.

Is this the best way to go about this and get a good rough estimate of weights without the scale?
__________________
ryguy76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2013, 10:07 PM   #19
Moderator Emeritus
 
SmokeyWren's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Midland County, Texas
Posts: 3,334
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryguy76 View Post
I don't have a weigh scale anywhere near my hometown, (closest is 100+ miles away) so I'm relying on sticker weights, and my own weights to determine where I'm at.
Then you won't get very close to your actual weights.

There has bound to be somewhere near you that has a least a one-pad scale. A farmer's Co-op grain elevator or cotton gin? A gravel pit or some place that sells dirt or gravel? In Midland the local concrete supplier has a one-pad scale.

Quote:
The brochure lists the dry hitch weight at 420lbs, which is what I have to use with no good way to get an accurate weight.
It's important to know tongue weight, so I bought a tongue weight scale. Here's one:
Sherline Trailer Tongue Weight Scale - 2,000-lb Capacity Sherline Tools 5780

$125 is a small investment compared to the investment in your RV and tow vehicle. Then there won't be any guessing.
__________________
SmokeyWren is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2013, 11:57 PM   #20
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 31
Quote:
There has bound to be somewhere near you that has a least a one-pad scale. A farmer's Co-op grain elevator or cotton gin? A gravel pit or some place that sells dirt or gravel? In Midland the local concrete supplier has a one-pad scale.
Ya, now that you bring up one pad scales, I may have an option or 2. There is no truck scale that I could do the whole combined weight, but tongue weight & TT weight, perhaps. The garbage dump has a scale, and maybe there is a scale at the local quarry.

Will unhitching and placing the TT Jack just onto the pad be accurate enough, or would the scale you linked to be better? If I invested in the scale you mention, can I rely on the 4073 as a ballpark. I can't see that I'll be ever loading more than 500Lbs in the TT. I've been diligent at weighing everything that gets loaded, and I'm not even close to that yet.

If I know the Tongue weight with either method from above, there shouldn't really be a need in the overall combined weight. I'll know the weight of cargo in the truck and add the Tongue weight to insure I'm below the payload capacity and around 12-13% of Total TT weight.

If I'm way off here, let me know.
__________________
ryguy76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2013, 06:01 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
tuffr2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Palm Coast Florida
Posts: 2,458
Can you plan to weigh it the next time you go camping? Sooner or later you will be on a highway with Truck Stops (Loves, Pilot, Flying J).

You will be surprised how much 'stuff' will end up in the trailer. I keep adding a tool here and there and DW keeps adding cleaning supplies. My trailer weighs more now then on trip 1, 2 or 3. I plan to weigh it next time I pass a truck stop.
__________________
tuffr2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2013, 11:05 AM   #22
Moderator Emeritus
 
SmokeyWren's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Midland County, Texas
Posts: 3,334
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryguy76 View Post
Will unhitching and placing the TT Jack just onto the pad be accurate enough, or would the scale you linked to be better?
Most scales with one big pad are nor certified, so they are accurate to within 50 to 100 pounds. They are intended to weigh thousands of pounds, not a few hundred pounds. If you want accuracy within about 20 pounds, then use the Sherline tongue weight scale to determine tongue (hitch) weight.

Quote:
If I know the Tongue weight with either method from above, there shouldn't really be a need in the overall combined weight.
Right. Your limiter is GVWR of the tow vehicle, not GCWR. Use the one-pad scale to weigh the wet and loaded tow vehicle without the trailer tied on. Then add the tongue weight per the Sherline tongue weight scale and compare the total to the GVWR of your tow vehicle.

Quote:
I'll know the weight of cargo in the truck and add the Tongue weight to insure I'm below the payload capacity and around 12-13% of Total TT weight.
Ignore "payload capacity". That's not a real number. Instead weigh the wet and loaded truck, then add the tongue weight to get GVW. Then compare your actual GVW to the GVWR of the truck to see how close you are to being overloaded.

Then later - on the road when you stop at a truckstop that has a CAT scale - fill up with gas then weigh the rig twice, once with the trailer and once without. The difference is your gross trailer weight. Divide your tongue weight by gross trailer weight to get percentage of hitch weight. For example on one trip my gross trailer weight was 4,870 and my hitch weight was 650. 650 divided by 4870 = 0.13347 = 13.35 percent. TT towed like a dream.


If your percentage of hitch weight falls between 12% and 15%, you're good to go. If not, then rearrange the weights in the trailer and adjust the WD hitch to again result in a level trailer.
__________________
SmokeyWren is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2013, 12:53 AM   #23
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario
Posts: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryguy76 View Post
Hi All,

Today was the first day that I was able to tow my new trailer with my new truck. I've had the TT parked in my driveway for a month (delivered), while I met Fords recommendation of 1000m before towing. I have a 2013 5L F-150 and am pulling a 4000lb 26' TT.

I have a WD hitch and it is setup and is fairly level. The TT hitch might ride a little high, if anything, but is definitely not sagging.

Anyway, having never towed before, I was a bit nervous about it all, but the tow mirrors were awesome and I got used to towing rather quickly. The "feeling" however, I'm not sure if it's what I should be feeling. The truck can feel like it's being pulled forward and back rhythmically, almost wave like. Not drastic, but noticeable. Is this normal?

Also, I didn't ever floor it, and was driving on relatively flat ground, but I'm surprised by how pulling the TT affects the trucks performance. I mean it slowly gets to 60mph without too much effort, but it's VERY noticeable that it's now pulling 4000lbs. Is there a way to test the truck to ensure it's got the pulling power it should?

And last thing... I was quite surprised at how noisy my double axle TT is when turning. Especially when backing it in (creaks, pops and clangs). I've read that this is quite normal, but man, they should prepare you for that when they sell it to a newbie.

Thanks!!
Don't worry about the creaks etc when backing, that's ok

Don't travel over 55 mph with a TT -best to avoid sway and sounds like you have it. I purchased a Husky CentreLine weight distribution hitch that checks sway automatically with hydraulics. An after market purchase solution would be purchasing added sway bars.

A 5 liter F1500 should be good to go with power. But go easy and just don't expect the get up and go you have without a TT in tow. I have the same set up and have no problems - I just adjust to new way of driving with some patience.
__________________
DonnyB007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2013, 04:37 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
Caveman CBB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Storden,MN
Posts: 672
If set up properly you don't have to stick to 55. But, I wouldn't go 70 or nothing. It's all depends on what your TT tires are rated for.
__________________
Caveman CBB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2013, 05:17 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
chawkins99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Calera, AL
Posts: 466
in the absence of anything more sophisticated, you can use some basic physics and a cheap bathroom scale to get a ballpark estimate of your tongue weight...

Most bathroom scales go up to about 300lbs so too low for a direct measure.

If you use the lever principal, placing a sturdy length of lumber on a pivot point (say a stool) and the other end on the bathroom scale. If you position your hitch exactly halfway along the lever, the scale will read exactly half of the true tongue weight. One third of the way along, will read one third the tongue weight etc.

Not ideal, but better than outright guess work.

Goes without saying.. Safety first... Make sure you are chocked.
__________________
Chris, Jo & Dell (Siberian Husky - 110lb of fur and muscle)
2003 Beaver Santiam 40DST - Cummins 330ISC
Closely followed by a 2012 Equinox AWD
chawkins99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2013, 05:33 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
tompen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 500
Somebody mentioned tire pressure on the trailer. Very important. Set them at the max cold setting marked on the tire. It will also pull easier. Suspension noise is normal. Put more tongue weight on to improve the handling. You can take all the weight off the rear and add it to the front of the truck with that hitch. Play with it a little. One link on the chains can make a big difference.
Have fun
__________________
2016 Wildwood 28RLDS
2014 Tundra 1794 Platnum,"23" T-Bucket
2011 Harley Softail, 2010 Spyder RTS
tompen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2013, 07:18 PM   #27
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 140
Wink trailer bouncing, hitch too high

We pull a 33 ft. TT with no problem but when I am towing my service trailer hauling a tractor I get the up down motion of the trailer as the weight of the tractor is on the back of the trailer and not set up right. Obviously too much weight at back of trailer. This may be what you are experiencing and possibly putting more weight on hitch will help.
__________________
Denlor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2013, 11:12 PM   #28
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by chawkins99 View Post
in the absence of anything more sophisticated, you can use some basic physics and a cheap bathroom scale to get a ballpark estimate of your tongue weight...

Most bathroom scales go up to about 300lbs so too low for a direct measure.

If you use the lever principal, placing a sturdy length of lumber on a pivot point (say a stool) and the other end on the bathroom scale. If you position your hitch exactly halfway along the lever, the scale will read exactly half of the true tongue weight. One third of the way along, will read one third the tongue weight etc.

Not ideal, but better than outright guess work.

2 scales<$100 including 4' of 2X10 Put tongue on 2X10, read scales, adjust accordingly.

Goes without saying.. Safety first... Make sure you are chocked.
good luck
__________________

__________________
Chowboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
towing



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:16 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.