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Old 08-27-2013, 06:56 PM   #1
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Basic inverter question

Hi,

I am a new TT owner. The TT I bought, a 2014 Jayflight, does not have
inversion. I verify this because the microwave clock goes out when you pull
the shore power.

It DOES have the ability to both supply DC from 120v power, and also to charge
the batteries from 120v, according to the manual.

I want to put an inverter in so that the 120v appliances and sockets will be live
while off shore power.

What is the simplest inverter arrangement I can add for this? Should I add a
manual switch to flip over to the inverter, or is there an arrangement that will automatically make the switch? I can see how manual switching would be a good idea if you don't want the inverter on all of the time.

Just looking for how others have handled this issue.

Scott
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Old 08-27-2013, 06:58 PM   #2
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Welcome.
You "converter" is what takes 120V and makes 12V from it and sends it into the 12V system.

With an inverter, you'll need a good battery bank. It probably only has one small group 24 battery.
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Old 08-27-2013, 08:02 PM   #3
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So the most confusing thing about hooking up an inverter in this case is that, since the system already has a charger, doing the obvious thing, just hooking the 110v in to the inverter with a switch that changes from shore to battery power creates a loop, that is, battery to inverter to 12v converter/charger, etc.

This can't be good.
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Old 08-27-2013, 08:14 PM   #4
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An inverter does not feed the converter if wired properly. It will feed GFCIs, TVs, and maybe a microwave at most. Not the converter circuit.
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Old 08-27-2013, 08:16 PM   #5
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An inverter does not feed the converter if wired properly. It will feed GFCIs, TVs, and maybe a microwave at most. Not the converter circuit.
So I need a switch that cuts out the converter, correct? I am going to be doing the wiring.

Thanks.
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Old 08-27-2013, 08:20 PM   #6
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No, just don't wire the converter into the system.
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Old 08-27-2013, 08:23 PM   #7
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First you need to figure the draw of all the appliances you want to power, once you have that you will need to buy the correct size inverter, add the right size and number of batteries, then redo the wiring to split out what you don't want to run off battery power and, to make it automatic a transfer switch.
Not for the normal RV owner to do unless you like a challenge! To run the microwave you'll need a pretty hefty battery bank. We have a 2000 watt inverter and 4 6 volt GC-2 batteries. Each battery is 66#'s, the inverter will run about $1,000 alone depending on the quality and whether modified sine wave or true sine wave. Even that won't run the microwave for very long.
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Old 08-27-2013, 08:47 PM   #8
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Thanks.

I found a pretty good overview of the hookup here:

RV Electrical Systems

Obviously there are more transfer elements involved. I have a small trailer but one of the reasons I like a 20ft trailer is for the idea that I can dry camp on occasion. So I am planning to add batteries and a solar panel to extend dry time.

It has a microwave, but my plan is to forget about it for dry camping. Same with the air conditioner. I got a 12v TV, and plan to go all LED with the lights. So really the inverter thing is for stuff I can't find ways to power from 12v directly, the prime example being a computer. Even though I have a very small, low power one (ITX MINI), computer power supplies are not something you commonly find in 12v only.

Another example would be the blu-ray disc player. I did find one in 12v, but the cost was really outrageous.

So lets say the plan is for zero 120v appliances, but the reality is one or two on occasion.
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Old 08-27-2013, 09:21 PM   #9
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aa????? I verify this because the microwave clock goes out when you pull
the shore power.

you can still have a inverter its like any thing else you have to turn
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Old 08-27-2013, 09:31 PM   #10
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aa????? I verify this because the microwave clock goes out when you pull
the shore power.

you can still have a inverter its like any thing else you have to turn
Somewheres a hidden switch eh? It reminds me of the time I spent an hour trying to figure out how to turn on the water heater. It clearly had a gas hookup, but otherwise no way to turn it on.

Then I realized I was looking behind the wrong door. It was the space heater.
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Old 08-27-2013, 09:43 PM   #11
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Inverters can be wired to power just particular circuits, or the whole coach.

Easy way to power the while coach is to simply plug the shore power cord into the inverter output when desired. When doing this the converter (battery charger) needs to be disabled - else the inverter is trying the charge the battery it is drawing power from - not a efficient circle of events. Disabling the converter can be as simple as unplugging it or putting a switch in it's input.

My coach is set up with an inverter powering the whole coach as I describe above.
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Old 08-27-2013, 11:49 PM   #12
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My coach is set up with an inverter powering the whole coach as I describe above.
So is mine.

I have a Xantrex PS2000, with a 100 amp charger.

It takes over the charging duties and I found that the converter is a standalone unit rather than built in to the AC panel, so I unplugged it. It was simply plugged in to a dedicated outlet for it.
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Old 08-28-2013, 05:51 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samiam95124 View Post
Thanks.

I found a pretty good overview of the hookup here:

RV Electrical Systems

Obviously there are more transfer elements involved. I have a small trailer but one of the reasons I like a 20ft trailer is for the idea that I can dry camp on occasion. So I am planning to add batteries and a solar panel to extend dry time.

It has a microwave, but my plan is to forget about it for dry camping. Same with the air conditioner. I got a 12v TV, and plan to go all LED with the lights. So really the inverter thing is for stuff I can't find ways to power from 12v directly, the prime example being a computer. Even though I have a very small, low power one (ITX MINI), computer power supplies are not something you commonly find in 12v only.

Another example would be the blu-ray disc player. I did find one in 12v, but the cost was really outrageous.

So lets say the plan is for zero 120v appliances, but the reality is one or two on occasion.
I think your are finally coming into reality. Get yourself two 6v GC batteries and perhaps a 600w inverter. That would be enough for the small computer, DVD and a few other things as needed. Check the items you will be using with it to make sure they can run on modified sine wave. If not, you'll need a pure sine wave.

You done right with the LEDs and the 12v TV. I did the same (tvs are LED too) and doubled our battery time. Everything we need is now 12v and we go about 3 days. If we need the micro, we use the genny for that brief period.
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Old 08-28-2013, 07:41 AM   #14
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One of the traps many RVers fall into has to do with the batteires... An Inverter large enough to run the TV can generally operate off a single 12 volt battery, say a Group 27.

However if you want to power the microwave a pair of GC-2 Golf Car batteries in series are the absolute minimum, two pair is the recommended minimum (That would be a 2,000 watt inverter by the way, one pair per kilowatt)

Others are giving you decent advice on the inverter... Most RV's are wired something like this.

Shore----Main breaker box---Inverter---Sub Panel--Sub Box

Main box---Heavy loads like Air Conditioenr, Fridge, Water heater, Electric heaters.

Sub box---Selected outlets TV (And related stuff) Microwave
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