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Old 01-14-2012, 08:42 AM   #1
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Black water dumping

We recently purchased a 2001 Fleetwood Pioneer and will be largely living in it on weekends. It will NOT move from its site, and we have no facilities at all there. With regard to black water, we plan to buy a black water transfer tank. We know that a local campground two miles away has a fee for dumping a black water "transfer tank." We know that commercial transfer tanks are available, but the maximum capacity is about 30 gallons. In order to minimize trips to the dump station, we want to purchase a larger tank from Tractor Supply - about 55 to 75 gallons - and adapt it for gravity drain at the local campground. We know we'll need proper fittings. Wonder if anyone can point us to those fittings, or if anyone has suggestions on a larger plastic tank that could be adapted for this use? Again, we're thinking of a 55 to 75 gallon tank that our tractor can load on the back of a pick-up truck, to minimize runs to the local dump station. Suggestions on fittings or tanks are appreciated. We realize it's easier to dump "en route," but again, the trailer won't be moving. We are really lucky to have a full-service campground so close by. This is a long-term solution for us, so initial start-up cost isn't that important.
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Old 01-14-2012, 08:58 AM   #2
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I would put in a depression era septic tank. That way you will not have to mess with the mess. If you dig the hole yourself it will cost less than two hundred dollars.
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Old 01-14-2012, 01:42 PM   #3
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I would put in a depression era septic tank. That way you will not have to mess with the mess. If you dig the hole yourself it will cost less than two hundred dollars.
how do you make something like it?

gbstewart
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Old 01-14-2012, 02:47 PM   #4
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Well, might be easier to just go to the CG with the RV and dump.

However. If you can get a good old 55 gallon drum, label it BIO-HAZARD of course.

Then you need a short pipe to screw into the larger bung, (2" I think) and from there you will need an adapter to go up to 3 inch (The standard sewer hose) or a length of 2" hose with an adapter to a standard sewer hose on the end of it (Yes they make those)

Now a macerator pump (Flo-Jet makes a good one, or RV-Sanicon) to pump the tank UP into the 55 Gallon drum.. You do know that 55 gallons of water, Just plain water, is over 400 pounds right. So use the pump to pump it up.

I would put a valve on that 2" line too.. With a macerator you can pump into the 1" "Vent" (put a valve on that too)

Open both valves, pump into the tank, close valves (After flushing the hose with clear water (portable macorator pumps come with the fitting to do that, at least mine did) cap the hose and hang it high Drive to the dump site, hook up the 2 or 3 inch hose from the dump valve, now open both valves again and let'er rip. Fuush with the non-potable water hose and you are ready for the next trip.
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Old 01-15-2012, 07:33 AM   #5
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how do you make something like it?

gbstewart
During the depression, people had no money. However they were Americans who at that time relied on themselves and not the government. 55 gallon drums were easy to come by. they made a working septic system from 55 gallon drums.
to see how to make one. go to ga traveler. go to statistics.go to find all posts by ga traveler.go to page 2. go to" number two or not" dated 12-06-11 If you have any problems getting to it, let me know and I will get back to you.
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Old 01-15-2012, 08:03 AM   #6
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Yup, if it's your property and you can get a couple of 55 gallon drums, making your own septic that can be pumped out by a local septic company is the best way to go.
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Old 01-15-2012, 09:32 AM   #7
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Norwesco makes a couple of nice tanks that fit the bed of a pickup. You can see them here if you are interested. Norwesco
More capacity than what you are looking at but far fewer trips.

A comprehensive catalog of available fittings, valves, etc., can be found at Home | Plastic Tanks | Plastic Buckets | Plastic Bottles | Labware | Plastic Tubing | PVC Pipe | U.S. Plastic Corp.

Good luck with your plan and keep us posted as to how you come out.
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Old 01-15-2012, 09:49 AM   #8
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During the depression, people had no money. ...they made a working septic system from 55 gallon drums.
That was then. Back then, we didn't even use a barrel. We simply dug a big hole in the ground and covered it with used railroad cross-ties, "tin" sheetmetal, and dirt. That's called a cesspool. Works fine in well-drained soil such as sandy loam.

But that's against the law now. About 50 years ago Texas passed a law outlawing cesspools and requiring they be replaced by septic tanks and drainage (leaching) fields. Most jurisdictions had such a law long before Texas implemented theirs.

The liquid (effluent) overflows the septic tank and flows out into the leaching field, but the solids stay in the septic tank and every few years have to be pumped out and transported to a sewage processing plant. We call the trucks that haul the solids a "honey wagon" or honey truck.

But installing a small septic tank system is not hard. You have to dig a big hole and the ditches for the leaching field. Then install the tank and leaching pipe (or vaults) and cover it all up with the same dirt you removed to dig the hole and ditches.

Well, it's a bit more complicated than that. You must spend time to design and layout the system, test the soil to see how big a system you need to satisfy the local law (health department), and have the health department inspector do his thing at the right time during construction. Renting a backhoe is probably an excellent idea, but you can do it with pick an shovel if you're adament about doing it on the cheap.

The tank itself will probably be at least a 500-gallon tank made of concrete, so you need to have the hole for it ready when the seller delivers and puts the tank in the hole. Plastic tanks are more expensive, and still too heavy for you to manhandle them, so you still need the seller to drop it in the hole for you.

The following is a link to a pro septic tank installer's "how to".
How To Build Septic Tank Systems

Full disclosure: In my case, when I built my 2,800 sq ft retirement home in the country, I hired the local plumber to install the HVAC system, the septic tank and leaching field. Messing with the big heavy septic tanks and the health department inspector was more than I wanted to tackle. I also hired subcontractors to do the concrete slab, skilled bricklayer to install the brick siding, and skilled guy to do the taping and bedding of the sheetrock. I did almost all the other work to build the house (design, plumbing, framing, doors, windows, electrical, sheetrock, roofing, flooring, cabinets, fixtures, and painting).

My house has 4 bedrooms, so it required two septic tanks, 1,000 and 500 gallons. Observing my plumber install the septic tanks and leaching field, I could have done it myself with a rental full-size backhoe, even place the heavy concrete tanks in the holes where they belong.
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Old 01-15-2012, 10:35 AM   #9
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Yup, if it's your property and you can get a couple of 55 gallon drums, making your own septic that can be pumped out by a local septic company is the best way to go.
This is a septic system not a storage system. It works just like a septic tank. You don't have to pump it out.
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Old 01-15-2012, 10:40 AM   #10
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And we wonder why our drinking waters are contaminated with medicines and mercury... GET A CLUE PEOPLE !
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Old 01-15-2012, 10:50 AM   #11
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And we wonder why our drinking waters are contaminated with medicines and mercury... GET A CLUE PEOPLE !
I don't understand your post. One advice is to pump out a storage tank and the other is a septic system. Both are in use all over the country and approved by the local governments.
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Old 01-15-2012, 10:58 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by SmokeyWren View Post
That was then. Back then, we didn't even use a barrel. We simply dug a big hole in the ground and covered it with used railroad cross-ties, "tin" sheetmetal, and dirt. That's called a cesspool. Works fine in well-drained soil such as sandy loam.

But that's against the law now. About 50 years ago Texas passed a law outlawing cesspools and requiring they be replaced by septic tanks and drainage (leaching) fields. Most jurisdictions had such a law long before Texas implemented theirs.

The liquid (effluent) overflows the septic tank and flows out into the leaching field, but the solids stay in the septic tank and every few years have to be pumped out and transported to a sewage processing plant. We call the trucks that haul the solids a "honey wagon" or honey truck.

But installing a small septic tank system is not hard. You have to dig a big hole and the ditches for the leaching field. Then install the tank and leaching pipe (or vaults) and cover it all up with the same dirt you removed to dig the hole and ditches.

Well, it's a bit more complicated than that. You must spend time to design and layout the system, test the soil to see how big a system you need to satisfy the local law (health department), and have the health department inspector do his thing at the right time during construction. Renting a backhoe is probably an excellent idea, but you can do it with pick an shovel if you're adament about doing it on the cheap.

The tank itself will probably be at least a 500-gallon tank made of concrete, so you need to have the hole for it ready when the seller delivers and puts the tank in the hole. Plastic tanks are more expensive, and still too heavy for you to manhandle them, so you still need the seller to drop it in the hole for you.

The following is a link to a pro septic tank installer's "how to".
How To Build Septic Tank Systems

Full disclosure: In my case, when I built my 2,800 sq ft retirement home in the country, I hired the local plumber to install the HVAC system, the septic tank and leaching field. Messing with the big heavy septic tanks and the health department inspector was more than I wanted to tackle. I also hired subcontractors to do the concrete slab, skilled bricklayer to install the brick siding, and skilled guy to do the taping and bedding of the sheetrock. I did almost all the other work to build the house (design, plumbing, framing, doors, windows, electrical, sheetrock, roofing, flooring, cabinets, fixtures, and painting).

My house has 4 bedrooms, so it required two septic tanks, 1,000 and 500 gallons. Observing my plumber install the septic tanks and leaching field, I could have done it myself with a rental full-size backhoe, even place the heavy concrete tanks in the holes where they belong.
The septic system I was talking about is a not a cess pool. It is a septic system just as you had installed. you can check it out on class a motorhome forum under recent discussions. entitled #number 2 or not". post #62.
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Old 01-15-2012, 01:44 PM   #13
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This is a septic system not a storage system. It works just like a septic tank. You don't have to pump it out.
You do have to occasionally pump out a septic tank. The solids need to be removed depending on the size of the system as it's related to the frequency of use.

Especially now that all of our soaps are anti-bacterial. They kill off all the bacteria that helps to dissolve the solids. You can put all the Rid-X you want into a septic but as soon as you flush anti-bacterial soap down the drain, it's dead.
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