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Old 09-05-2019, 09:18 AM   #1
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Carrying Capacity

My wife is really liking the Sporttrek touring STT312VBH due to the large bedroom in the front. It is heavy and has a really high tongue weight but should still be well within the specs on my truck.



The one thing I don't like is the carry capacity of only 1,190 lbs. Throw in the second AC, battery, propane tanks etc and that number is probably closer to 900lbs.



We never really travel with water in the tanks and most heavy items outside of food go in the truck.



Does anyone else think that is to low a capacity and we should move on even if it is a layout we love?
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Old 09-05-2019, 09:35 AM   #2
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Where did you get that number? Best is to find the yellow as it left the factory sticker subtract that from the GVWR as listed on the tag on the street side front corner. That will be your most accurate information. Personally I would shop some more and find something else. It's amazing how fast weight adds up
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Old 09-05-2019, 10:50 AM   #3
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In my mind with a low cargo capacity the axles / tires / frame are just about maxxed out.
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Old 09-05-2019, 11:15 AM   #4
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From there website:


UVW: 7610lbs
GVWR: 8,800
Net Carry capacity: 1,190




Real world picture of the side sticker on one similar to what we are looking at shows the weight of cargo to never exceed 1080lbs.
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Old 09-05-2019, 07:56 PM   #5
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Bet you dollars-to-donuts that the actual, real weight of that unit on the scale is hundreds of pounds more than that 7,610 number.
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Old 09-06-2019, 08:31 AM   #6
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I would never buy a TT/5er with low a low CCC. That 1190 will easily be under 1,000 lbs after propane and Batteries. Plus they never are what they are from brochures.
Now if you are just a weekend power poll camper that doesn't cook much if at all and only pack the bare necessities then that would work.
If you are wanting to do some week long trips then 1,000 lbs will barely cut it.
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Old 09-07-2019, 01:36 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mcpickle View Post
From there website:


UVW: 7610lbs
GVWR: 8,800
Net Carry capacity: 1,190




Real world picture of the side sticker on one similar to what we are looking at shows the weight of cargo to never exceed 1080lbs.
New RV trailers are required to have a ďrecreational vehicle cargo carrying capacity label" affixed to the trailer. Normally it will be on the left side external section of the trailer forward of the axles. It depicts the cargo capacity as delivered to the dealer. It includes battery, any propane system provided with the trailer and the weight of the propane and any/all options added at the factory. Any options added by the dealer with a combined weight exceeding 100# before the sale must be deducted from that cargo label and the label must be amended showing the change.
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Old 09-08-2019, 01:03 AM   #8
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My guess is that most people carry less than 1K. My TT has a rating of just over 2k. Packed full with everything I need I’m not close. If you end up with 8-900 lbs then you will probably be over weight. The problem is that the units have unloaded weights riding on low capacity axles for cost savings so you don’t have sufficient load capacity.
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Old 09-09-2019, 01:00 AM   #9
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My guess is that most people carry less than 1K. My TT has a rating of just over 2k. Packed full with everything I need Iím not close. If you end up with 8-900 lbs then you will probably be over weight. The problem is that the units have unloaded weights riding on low capacity axles for cost savings so you donít have sufficient load capacity.
It's against the law for a RV trailer manufacturer to build a trailer with axles having insufficient load capacities.
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Old 09-10-2019, 12:49 PM   #10
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It's against the law for a RV trailer manufacturer to build a trailer with axles having insufficient load capacities.
Let me explain further. First it is against the law to use under capacity axles. Thatís not what Iím talking about. Also how many threads have we see on this website wher owners have had their axles replaced because they were too light.
What I was saying is that the unit has axles that have a rating very close to the unloaded weight of the trailer. The manufacturers cut costs wherever they can. Low capacity axles, no shocks no greaseable wet bolts, no self adjusting brakes and no quality equalizers on double or triple axles. That just for the axles! Going with 3k axles might work for supporting the trailer as an axample but if you want better carrying capacity on that unit you may need to go to at least 3.5 k axles. My trailer has over 2k load capacity but it wouldnít with lesser capacity axles.
Let me know if I need to explain it further.
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Old 09-11-2019, 12:03 AM   #11
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The trailer manufacturer must comply with the FMVSS (standards) and vehicle certification.

The rule for setting the vehicle certified GAWRs is to insure their maximum load capacity, when added to the trailer manufacturers published/recommended hitch/tongue is not less than the vehicle certified GVWR. To inflate the GAWRs load capacity beyond what is necessary for vehicle certification would only invites vehicle overloading. That is why they have the authority to set an axle's GAWR to a lessor value than the axle manufacturer has certified the axle to carry.

The vehicle certification label displays the individual trailer's GVWR. Consumers are always warned not to exceed the GVWR, doing so may cause a multitude of OEM product failures from overloading as they were all selected to support the GVWR.

Remember, the addition of aftermarket upgrades does not change the GVWR or any GAWR. Only the vehicle manufacturer or a certified modifier have that authority.
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Old 09-11-2019, 10:00 AM   #12
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Go over to the Grand Design Owners forum and read about all the axle failures on Imagine and Reflection trailers. GD was putting 3500# axles on Imagines and many owners were needing them replaced. GD stepped up and installed 4400# axles on them. GD then switched production to 4400# axles on new units.
On their Reflection 5ers particularly the 303 unit they had sagging sides on the drivers side. A fix was implemented by owners to raise the driver side.

Not picking on GD at all. Just using them as an example of whats being built these days. Many MFG's do the same thing. It's up to the consumer to check out everything prior to purchase. Tough to do for newbies since they don't know what they don't know.

Just because an RV MFG builds it, it doesn't mean it's built properly.
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Old 09-11-2019, 02:33 PM   #13
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Go over to the Grand Design Owners forum and read about all the axle failures on Imagine and Reflection trailers. GD was putting 3500# axles on Imagines and many owners were needing them replaced. GD stepped up and installed 4400# axles on them. GD then switched production to 4400# axles on new units.
On their Reflection 5ers particularly the 303 unit they had sagging sides on the drivers side. A fix was implemented by owners to raise the driver side.

Not picking on GD at all. Just using them as an example of whats being built these days. Many MFG's do the same thing. It's up to the consumer to check out everything prior to purchase. Tough to do for newbies since they don't know what they don't know.

Just because an RV MFG builds it, it doesn't mean it's built properly.
I just finished about an hour researching axle posts on the GD owner's forum. The thing that stood out was the lack of owner knowledge about how axles are chosen and fitted to RV trailers. IMO their problems are predictable, overweight. The trailer manufacturer is not going to fit a trailer with 4400# axles when the building specs will clearly allow 3500# axles. The trailer builder builds to a computer generated model with the goal set on GVWR. To use axles specked out higher than necessary invites the consumer to load to those inflated specs thus overloading the GVWR. The actual spec they must build to is minimal and is from FMVSS 571.120 paragraph; S10.2 On RV trailers, the sum of the GAWRs of all axles on the vehicle plus the vehicle manufacturer's recommended tongue weight must not be less than the GVWR. Axles are not built in every 100# increment so the trailer builder has the authority to set the GAWRs to a value lower than the axle manufacturer's certified load capacity.

When an owner upgrades their axles, say, from vehicle certified 3500# axle to 4400# axle manufacturer certification, the GAWR values on the trailer's federal certification label do not change. The owner just added some load capacity reserves provided with the upgraded axle.

Remember, only the vehicle manufacturer or a certified vehicle modifier have the authority to change certification values. Adding upgrades are authorized but they are for reserves only.

Vehicle certification documents are complicated and require researching other documents for an accurate conclusion. The best place to start is with the actual certification documents found at; 49 CFR part 567.
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Old 09-11-2019, 05:35 PM   #14
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I just finished about an hour researching axle posts on the GD owner's forum. The thing that stood out was the lack of owner knowledge about how axles are chosen and fitted to RV trailers. IMO their problems are predictable, overweight. The trailer manufacturer is not going to fit a trailer with 4400# axles when the building specs will clearly allow 3500# axles. The trailer builder builds to a computer generated model with the goal set on GVWR. To use axles specked out higher than necessary invites the consumer to load to those inflated specs thus overloading the GVWR. The actual spec they must build to is minimal and is from FMVSS 571.120 paragraph; S10.2 On RV trailers, the sum of the GAWRs of all axles on the vehicle plus the vehicle manufacturer's recommended tongue weight must not be less than the GVWR. Axles are not built in every 100# increment so the trailer builder has the authority to set the GAWRs to a value lower than the axle manufacturer's certified load capacity.

When an owner upgrades their axles, say, from vehicle certified 3500# axle to 4400# axle manufacturer certification, the GAWR values on the trailer's federal certification label do not change. The owner just added some load capacity reserves provided with the upgraded axle.

Remember, only the vehicle manufacturer or a certified vehicle modifier have the authority to change certification values. Adding upgrades are authorized but they are for reserves only.

Vehicle certification documents are complicated and require researching other documents for an accurate conclusion. The best place to start is with the actual certification documents found at; 49 CFR part 567.
If you research Imagine TT's you'll see that they did in fact just add 4400# axles to their units. It was easy to find proof. All I had to do was go to Trailer Hitch RV as they post sticker info about each unit along with all the interior exterior photos. You could clearly see that GD upgraded the axles during the model year. You could see 2018 vs 2019 units of the same model. One sticker would show 3500# axles and the newer upgraded unit of the same model would show 4400# axles. I doubt they changed the frame or anything. Like most MFG they were just keeping costs as low as possible.
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