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Old 03-02-2019, 08:54 AM   #15
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@shane_the_ee, no not a large difference in upfront price; however, significantly worse fuel economy so much higher cost to operate. I think the Armada is near worst-in-class for fuel economy.
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Old 03-02-2019, 09:07 AM   #16
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We have a 2017 Lance 2285 I tow with a 2011 F-150, 5.0, tow package...
We were originally looking at Artic Fox, as We wanted 4 sesson rated. Then we found Lance..
Considerably lighter , LOVED the floorplan,
Havn't camped in real cold yet, but have had 15 inches of snow on it & no leaks..
O have noticed on this site, no one really likes Lance, don't know why.... I know they are more expensive than most, but look how they are built... All Azdel construction. All CNC machined, including cabinets. No trim that hides bad fit & finish..
Just my 2 cents.....
Good luck on finding what's best for YOU !!!
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Old 03-02-2019, 09:12 AM   #17
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Thank you for all the feedback. Any additional is most welcomed.

The Durango isn't set in stone. I'm looking at that type of vehicle because I'd be teavelling with dogs and would prefer them not be in the back seat. I know it's a unibody construction. As far as the towing capacity, the manufacturer runs legal risk if the vehicle isn't up to the task of meeting the ratings it states. As said though, not set in stone.

I haven't looked at the Bigfoot, or Escape trailers. Taking a quick look at the Bigfoot, I don't like the lower propane capacity, or the water capacity. Not really a fan of the crawl-over bed layout either, although could deal with it.

The Escape are quite lightweight. Is it possible to create a '4-season' trailer that light? The fact of only 2 batteries and small tank capacities is worrisome.

Someone mentioned the slide and yes, that is a consideration and my preference would be without.

Wasn't aware lithium batteries were an option. Definitely worth looking into. I have a little Noco booster and it's terrific. I'm a photographer, so well aware of those batts not liking the cold. Was considering adding a 2nd lithium/solar generator anyway, so lithium main batts make sense.
As far as Dodge fearing lawsuits from customers about stated weights, I wouldn't hold your breath. The biggest factor is that they have teams of expensive lawyers and much deeper pockets than their average customer. And probably more realistic is that the customer that believed their advertised tow ratings wouldn't survive the accident to file a suit.

Go as big as you can afford with the TV, and if you stick with a TT make sure you get the best anti sway set up you can afford.
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Old 03-02-2019, 09:33 AM   #18
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We have a 2017 Lance 2285 I tow with a 2011 F-150, 5.0, tow package...
We were originally looking at Artic Fox, as We wanted 4 sesson rated. Then we found Lance..
Considerably lighter , LOVED the floorplan,
Havn't camped in real cold yet, but have had 15 inches of snow on it & no leaks..
O have noticed on this site, no one really likes Lance, don't know why.... I know they are more expensive than most, but look how they are built... All Azdel construction. All CNC machined, including cabinets. No trim that hides bad fit & finish..
Just my 2 cents.....
Good luck on finding what's best for YOU !!!
Lance are well made. agree. I think some think they're overpriced. Floor plans are not the best. Quirky things like slide out trays instead of drawers in the kitchen. Front window is not necessary.
I would buy the 2295 if I were looking for a light weight TT. We just like two places to sit and Lances seem cramped when they add two seating area's.
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Old 03-02-2019, 10:20 AM   #19
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Choosing between trailers

A few crude rules of thumb Iíve gleaned reading over all these TT and towing posts on iRV2... for CUVs and smaller SUVs max TT GVW is around 65%-75% of tow rating. As an example, my Ď06 Explorer with 5,400 lb rating could not tow more than about 4,000 lbs with my combination of payload capacity, rear axle capacity, GCWR, and family in the TV. Everyoneís situation will be different of course. Above that, one needs to graduate up to 1/2 ton truck, which seems to have an upper limit of around 7,000 lbs again depending on payload and TV equipment and wheelbase. Payload capacities seem to vary greatly depending on make, model, trim, and equipment. Above that it is 3/4 ton territory; and the demarcation between 3/4 ton and 1 ton is an even wider zone which seems to be somewhere around 9,000-11,000 lbs gross TT weight. I think with the newer trucks and engines being introduced now, those weight transitions will be increasing as 1/2 ton and 3/4 ton trucks seem to be doing herculean tasks these days.
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Old 03-02-2019, 12:35 PM   #20
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Our Lance 1995 has a fully loaded tongue weight between 600 and 650 lbs. Including tri-propane tanks, and 2 group 31 batteries. We have the factory lift and have zero issues with ground clearance. Low hanging trees are more of an issue.
I do agree that a non slide unit would be best for the OP intended use.
All three are great units, but like others have already mentioned get the right tool for the job. ORV are tongue heavy, the biggest reason we didnít even consider it for our 1/2 ton. Using up all your payload on a TT thus leaving the truck bed useless was not an option for us.
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Old 03-02-2019, 06:40 PM   #21
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Your biggest decision will be whether or not the Durango is an appropriate tow vehicle. The Durango is not a true body on frame vehicle and is a unibody construction, not really suitable for towing. You will be severely limited in your choice of TT with that as your TV. I wouldn't tow anything bigger than a Uhaul trailer with it.
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Old 03-02-2019, 11:17 PM   #22
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The Durango is not a true body on frame vehicle and is a unibody construction, not really suitable for towing.
Depends on what year Durango. My 2004 is body on frame construction. However, the 3rd generation Durango starting in 2011 uses a unibody construction. My 2004 has over 8,000 lb towing capacity with a 1590 lb payload capacity.
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Old 03-03-2019, 09:09 AM   #23
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Thanks for the additional feedback & information. As it happens, I posted this question on another RV forum and the tone of the couple replies I did get was very different. This seems a much more helpful place.

Seating for 2, or more, is not an issue as I'd be travelling alone, well and with dogs.

Regardless of what trailer & tow vehicle I got, I would add a good weight distribution hitch and sway bar.

I appreciate the feedback from Lance owners. The smaller water capacity and lower battery capacity is a concern. The Lance also has a slide, which I'm less interested in.

Someone mentioned Escape earlier and I did more looking into those. Don't think they'd really be up to the task. Small water tanks and quite a low-powered furnace compared to the others. Not really a fan of the floorplans either.

Re: the tow vehicle, while I'd rather not go the pickup route, that's likely the proper choice. Past experience with pickups has been that they're not overly comfortable for extended driving.

The ORV 3500 lb axles raise a question when the GVWR is 7200 lbs. I can't find the axle ratings for the Arctic Fox 22G.
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Old 03-03-2019, 09:23 AM   #24
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Re: the tow vehicle, while I'd rather not go the pickup route, that's likely the proper choice. Past experience with pickups has been that they're not overly comfortable for extended driving.
Not sure what the latest model year pickup you've driven but my hemi ram half ton is the most comfortable long trip vehicle I've ever owned (and I've owned a lot of cars and trucks). Smooth ride, loaded with features, and power to gills. I've ridden in a newer F150 and thought it rode very well too. Nowadays I wouldn't lump pickups into poor ride categories. Go test drive a few. May surprise you.
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Old 03-03-2019, 09:52 AM   #25
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Oh, no doubt they're better than they used to be. Yes, I'd absolutely drive some to find the best for me.
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Old 03-03-2019, 10:06 AM   #26
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Oh, no doubt they're better than they used to be. Yes, I'd absolutely drive some to find the best for me.
Since you will be towing long distances the ride loaded and hooked up is more important than empty. I had a Surburban for 13 years before my Ram. Loved the truck to death but towed with it a few times and switched to a pickup. It was a decent tow vehicle but just didn't handle tongue weight and windy towing well enough for my liking. Everything has tradeoffs and each person has unique needs and tolerances. The most important thing is not investing in too little truck to start. You won't like towing with it and it will be on your mind every time you tow. Upgrading shortly after buying is an expensive process.
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Old 03-03-2019, 11:59 AM   #27
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On the trailer, the GVWR includes the tongue wt so unless the sum of the two axle ratings is less than the GVWR less 10% you should be OK. You also need to look at the tire ratings as well.
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Old 03-03-2019, 03:31 PM   #28
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Northwood (Artic Fox/Nash) and ORV are exceptionally well built TT but they are heavy. If I had a heavy duty truck probably my first choice because of strength and value.

If I were to take that trip right now I'd be pulling a Lance 1995. Lance's construction practices are the best in the industry, good 4 seasons ability (none are perfect), light weight and water resistant Azdel construction, fit and finsh is top of the industry. They are green, with no toxic chemicals emtted from interior materials, plus great resale value, all this and they are light weight. Lance's are a premium brand and expensive, you get what you pay for.

If you are OK with small and no slides, a Lance 1475 gives you the same ultimate construction in a smallish easy to tow trailer.

As for tow ratings, think of boats. Certain vehicles can tow a 6000lb boat, with the weight on the rear and little on the tongue. Now take a 6000lb TT and you have 600-900 lbs on the tongue. If your vehicle only had a 1200 lb payload, then that only leaves you 300 pounds for everything else in your truck.
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Hoping for some insights from owners of these vehicles.

I'm in the process of researching small(ish) travel trailers for the possibility of a year-long trek around Canada. Coast to coast to coast.

Given that I'd be experiencing weather extremes, particularly cold, I'm looking at so-called 4-season trailers.

Tow vehicle would most likely be a Dodge Durango; v6, or v8 depending on the trailer.

I live in Ontario and neither the Arctic Fox, nor ORV are sold here, so choosing one of those would be sight unseen.

I'd not be staying in campgrounds much; especially in winter, obviously. I know that in winter I'd be using a lot of electric & propane. I can plan the trip so that extremely cold winter locales (e.g., Far North) would be visited in spring, or fall.

I've pretty much narrowed my search to the following:
ORV 18/21RBS, 20SK
Arctic Fox 22G
Lance 1995

Upside of the ORV models is price. They seem to ring in several thousand less than the others. I like the ability to include a decent generator, the higher propane tank capacity, the larger water tank capacity, the option to have 4 batteries and the floorplan. Downside is that they only will install a heat pad on the fresh water tank, although I know I could get other tank/pipe heaters installed aftermarket.

WRT the Arctic Fox, it's a bit larger than the others. It can come with tank/pipe heaters on all. It too can be had with a generator, although a bit lower powered one than the ORV. I don't know that the Azdel makes much difference. You're limited to 2 batteries & a smaller propane volume, as well as smaller water/waste tanks.

I think I've pretty much excluded the Lance; however, input is appreciated. The Lance doesn't seem to be as solidly 4-season as the others. You can add a 3rd propane tank, for a total of 60 lbs which matches the ORV. It only accommodates a single battery as far as I can determine. It's also the most expensive of the three.

I'm aware of the Oliver trailers. They are very expensive and there are no Canadian dealers.

I'd appreciate thoughts from owners of any of these trailers, or others in the same model family.

Thanks.
Northwood (Artic Fox/Nash) and ORV are exceptionally well built TT but they are heavy. If I had a heavy duty truck probably my first choice because of strength and value.

If I were to take that trip right now I'd be pulling a Lance 1995. Lance's construction practices are the best in the industry, good 4 seasons ability (none are perfect), light weight and water resistant Azdel construction, fit and finsh is top of the industry. They are green, with no toxic chemicals emtted from interior materials. Lance has great resale value, they are light weight and easy to tow. Lance's are a premium brand, they are expensive, but you get what you pay for.

If you are OK with small and no slides, a Lance 1475 gives you the same ultimate construction in a smallish easy to tow trailer.

As for tow ratings, think of boats. Certain vehicles can tow a 6000lb boat, a boats weight us on the rear and little on the tongue. Now take a 6000lb TT and you have 10 -15% 600-900 lbs on the tongue. If your vehicle only had a 1200 lb payload, then that would only leave you 300 pounds for everything else in your truck.

Sounds like a fun trip, which ever trailer you choose your going to have a great adventure. Please do drop back in and let us know what you purchased. Also there are threads on this site for sharing photos of your trip, would love to see them.

Happy Travels
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