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Old 11-20-2013, 07:19 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by jesilvas View Post
When a hub is full of grease, water can essentially not permeate anything. RVs are not into water, so they are different. Boat trailers don't have brakes (most if not all, I'm not sure), and RVs do.
Sorry but that last statement is not true. This will depend on state and provincial law but trailers over a certain weight require brakes and that includes boats.

My current boat 20 feet long plus motor etc weighs about 3500 lbs plus the trailer. It has surge brakes. My last boats weighed in at 5500 lbs on plus trailer and those are dry weights so likely over 7000 lbs. You need to calculate 90 gallons of gas and fishing equipment etc. Anyway that trailer had electric brakes. Needless to say I have come quite proficient in greasing and changing bearings.
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Old 11-20-2013, 07:31 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by CanadianCrew View Post
Sorry but that last statement is not true. This will depend on state and provincial law but trailers over a certain weight require brakes and that includes boats.

My current boat 20 feet long plus motor etc weighs about 3500 lbs plus the trailer. It has surge brakes. My last boats weighed in at 5500 lbs on plus trailer and those are dry weights so likely over 7000 lbs. You need to calculate 90 gallons of gas and fishing equipment etc. Anyway that trailer had electric brakes. Needless to say I have come quite proficient in greasing and changing bearings.
Ok, wasn't sure.
Why have you become proficient at changing bearings?
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Old 11-20-2013, 08:36 PM   #17
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Have you pulled hubs to see if your brake pads are coated?

Also, that is not proper bearing packing. That hub is FULL of grease. It can and will leak out the rear seal. The bearings should only be impregnated with grease and given a coating, but not have the ENTIRE HUB FULL.
This coming spring I will do a full removal, bearing and seal replacement, and repack. In most hubs there is a recessed area between the bearings that is actually supposed to have grease in it as well. When properly done, the hub is almost full of grease, already. This is my third set of EZ Lube hubs (on a bass boat, and my first TT, and now this one) and I have yet to have a bit of grease on the brake shoes. The brakes are working as intended. I know this because I had to do a panic stop on my last trip... and she didn't lock up, grab, chatter, or push me around... just a very fast, smooth, straight stop from 65 mph. Again, it works... why knock it?
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Old 11-20-2013, 08:47 PM   #18
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Ok, wasn't sure.
Why have you become proficient at changing bearings?
Sorry I guess I did not explain that too well. We have had a number of boats and many travel trailers. Most of the boats I bought in a non functioning state and repaired and sold after a season or 2. The one I refered to earlier that weighed in at 7000lbs had been fully restored and then bought and neglected by a young owner. I had to replace all the bearings on both axles. I was surprised I got it home after looking at the bearings. Some of the balls where coming out of the races. Rusty and dry with no grease.

The good news and back to the topic is that I have never had to replace the EZ lube bearings even on a boat trailer that gets immersed regularly. The other good news is that with regular preventive maintenance I have never had a bearing go on the road which is common on boat trailers.
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Old 11-28-2013, 08:22 AM   #19
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First time I have ever read a thread where most folks seem to have a handle on what Ez-Lube axles are. They are a salesman's tool, and nothing more. I have, on several occasions, stood next to salespeople as they lie and tell potential buyers that you only need to "squirt a little grease in there" and the old fashion repacking is a thing of the past.
Bottom line is that the manufacturer states that they need to be disassembled and inspected on a regular basis. Sorry but IMHO, they are a joke. I have pulled a hub on a brand new rig, only to find grease blown past the magical "double lip seals".

When operating a well maintained rig, ez-lubes are of no value. When they are misused, by many folks, attempting to avoid proper maintenance, they do more harm than good. I have pulled medium sized TTs well over 100K miles all over North America with zero issues. Properly serviced bearing require a small palm full of grease. When you have taken the time to pump several tubes of grease into them, as I was shocked to read in this thread, you do two things. First, you end up burying a small bearing in several pounds of grease. I can't really see much cooling of the bearing happening at that point. It only needs a very small amount, deliberately encapsulating it in several pounds of grease is foolish. This not only doesn't make much sense, it makes legitimate servicing a real PITA. I have repaired used rigs owned by folks who went with the "more is better, just blow a few tubes in there every spring" serving routine, and it is nothing but a nasty mess. The bearing is surrounded by a small amount of slightly discolored grease, and the whole assembly is a mess, creating a need to hand excavate massive amounts of wasted grease. The other issue is that pumping grease into the zerk WILL drive it past the seal and into the brakes. Maybe not every time, but often enough that it is a common problem.

IMHO, if you are a competent mechanic, doing your own service, you know enough to understand that they are a BS sales gimmick. If you bought the story for the sales lizard, and you heads out every spring, with your grease gun, you better think about having the axles disassembled, cleaned, and having the brakes serviced. I have seen rigs that were a few years old with virtually useless brakes, due to the fact that they have never been adjusted, and are coated with centrifuged bearing grease, due to annual " Ez-lube greasing"

Proper maintenance is an annual inspection of the bearing and brakes, including cleaning and adjusting everything. If you are doing significant miles, then repack the bearings while you are there. After fifteen years of 10-15k miles of towing every years, I have had zero issues following this method. My only involvement with ez-lubes is when we buy a used rig and it is necessary to repair the damage caused by the previous owner.
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Old 11-29-2013, 09:01 AM   #20
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First time I have ever read a thread where most folks seem to have a handle on what Ez-Lube axles are. They are a salesman's tool, and nothing more. I have, on several occasions, stood next to salespeople as they lie and tell potential buyers that you only need to "squirt a little grease in there" and the old fashion repacking is a thing of the past.
Bottom line is that the manufacturer states that they need to be disassembled and inspected on a regular basis. Sorry but IMHO, they are a joke. I have pulled a hub on a brand new rig, only to find grease blown past the magical "double lip seals".

When operating a well maintained rig, ez-lubes are of no value. When they are misused, by many folks, attempting to avoid proper maintenance, they do more harm than good. I have pulled medium sized TTs well over 100K miles all over North America with zero issues. Properly serviced bearing require a small palm full of grease. When you have taken the time to pump several tubes of grease into them, as I was shocked to read in this thread, you do two things. First, you end up burying a small bearing in several pounds of grease. I can't really see much cooling of the bearing happening at that point. It only needs a very small amount, deliberately encapsulating it in several pounds of grease is foolish. This not only doesn't make much sense, it makes legitimate servicing a real PITA. I have repaired used rigs owned by folks who went with the "more is better, just blow a few tubes in there every spring" serving routine, and it is nothing but a nasty mess. The bearing is surrounded by a small amount of slightly discolored grease, and the whole assembly is a mess, creating a need to hand excavate massive amounts of wasted grease. The other issue is that pumping grease into the zerk WILL drive it past the seal and into the brakes. Maybe not every time, but often enough that it is a common problem.

IMHO, if you are a competent mechanic, doing your own service, you know enough to understand that they are a BS sales gimmick. If you bought the story for the sales lizard, and you heads out every spring, with your grease gun, you better think about having the axles disassembled, cleaned, and having the brakes serviced. I have seen rigs that were a few years old with virtually useless brakes, due to the fact that they have never been adjusted, and are coated with centrifuged bearing grease, due to annual " Ez-lube greasing"

Proper maintenance is an annual inspection of the bearing and brakes, including cleaning and adjusting everything. If you are doing significant miles, then repack the bearings while you are there. After fifteen years of 10-15k miles of towing every years, I have had zero issues following this method. My only involvement with ez-lubes is when we buy a used rig and it is necessary to repair the damage caused by the previous owner.
Most of us are NOT "competent mechanics." If they are misused, like anything in life, there will be problems. You are right on that part.

They are far from a "gimmick." For those of us disabled and/or unable to tear down and pack by hand, they help a lot.

I have them, and use them properly. M brakes still work.
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Old 11-29-2013, 09:02 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Slate Run View Post
First time I have ever read a thread where most folks seem to have a handle on what Ez-Lube axles are. They are a salesman's tool, and nothing more. I have, on several occasions, stood next to salespeople as they lie and tell potential buyers that you only need to "squirt a little grease in there" and the old fashion repacking is a thing of the past.
Bottom line is that the manufacturer states that they need to be disassembled and inspected on a regular basis. Sorry but IMHO, they are a joke. I have pulled a hub on a brand new rig, only to find grease blown past the magical "double lip seals".

When operating a well maintained rig, ez-lubes are of no value. When they are misused, by many folks, attempting to avoid proper maintenance, they do more harm than good. I have pulled medium sized TTs well over 100K miles all over North America with zero issues. Properly serviced bearing require a small palm full of grease. When you have taken the time to pump several tubes of grease into them, as I was shocked to read in this thread, you do two things. First, you end up burying a small bearing in several pounds of grease. I can't really see much cooling of the bearing happening at that point. It only needs a very small amount, deliberately encapsulating it in several pounds of grease is foolish. This not only doesn't make much sense, it makes legitimate servicing a real PITA. I have repaired used rigs owned by folks who went with the "more is better, just blow a few tubes in there every spring" serving routine, and it is nothing but a nasty mess. The bearing is surrounded by a small amount of slightly discolored grease, and the whole assembly is a mess, creating a need to hand excavate massive amounts of wasted grease. The other issue is that pumping grease into the zerk WILL drive it past the seal and into the brakes. Maybe not every time, but often enough that it is a common problem.

IMHO, if you are a competent mechanic, doing your own service, you know enough to understand that they are a BS sales gimmick. If you bought the story for the sales lizard, and you heads out every spring, with your grease gun, you better think about having the axles disassembled, cleaned, and having the brakes serviced. I have seen rigs that were a few years old with virtually useless brakes, due to the fact that they have never been adjusted, and are coated with centrifuged bearing grease, due to annual " Ez-lube greasing"

Proper maintenance is an annual inspection of the bearing and brakes, including cleaning and adjusting everything. If you are doing significant miles, then repack the bearings while you are there. After fifteen years of 10-15k miles of towing every years, I have had zero issues following this method. My only involvement with ez-lubes is when we buy a used rig and it is necessary to repair the damage caused by the previous owner.
Most of us are NOT "competent mechanics." If they are misused, like anything in life, there will be problems. You are right on that part.

They are far from a "gimmick." For those of us disabled and/or unable to tear down and pack by hand, they help a lot.

I have them, and use them properly. My brakes still work.
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Old 12-01-2013, 10:20 AM   #22
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I've had four trailers with EZ Lubes. Over 20 years and thousands of miles, I never had to replace a bearing or replace brakes. I now have a trailer with the Lippert system. I hope it works as well...........
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Old 12-02-2013, 10:57 PM   #23
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I am a "competent" mechanic... The goobermint allows me to work on airplanes, that carry passengers whose lives are at stake. I'm afraid that I will have to respectfully disagree that they are a sales gimmick. Mine work fine. As I stated, as part of a maintenance schedule, they are a good tool. If I spin my wheel and pump in grease, it comes right out the front. If any of it is discolored with metal flakes... it's time to tear her down and have a look. If it doesn't come out the front, it's time to tear her down and have a look. Every 2 years, they get torn down and replaced, lock, stock, and barrel... Oh, and seals... I can't imagine anyone having a problem with that. So, let's just agree to disagree.
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Old 12-03-2013, 04:30 PM   #24
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Do aircraft get the same quality of wheel bearings that travel trailers do? I hope not, otherwise I'll never fly again.

From all the reading I've done on various forums, if you have the EZ-Lube or Ultru-Lube axles, the prevailing wisdom is to check your bearings on a regular basis regardless. Even the government certified frame shop that I took our trailer to said the same thing and they had an example of a bearing on the front counter to show what happens to them. They also said that none of the wheel bearings made in China are any good and that there is only one brand that they trust.

We've got Ultru-Lube, but for the $200 or so it costs, we'll take our TT into a shop annually for a repack and inspection and get the brakes looked at too.
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Old 12-03-2013, 11:03 PM   #25
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Do aircraft get the same quality of wheel bearings that travel trailers do? I hope not, otherwise I'll never fly again.
Uh... No... Most of what I see in aircraft parts is top notch and well engineered... and more expensive than anyone not familiar with the industry can imagine. However, all Chinese bearings are not equal. That being said, I am sure that the bearings in the TT hubs are not as good as Timken or Bower and mine will be changed this spring.

If you would read my posts, you might figure that I have a maintenance schedule... like I do for my vehicles and like I did for my sailplane when I still had it. If your TT had a maintenance schedule like a 747, it would never wear out... because just about every part of it would be totally rebuilt or replaced every few years, and inspected way more often than that.

Pumping grease into these hubs is somewhat of an inspection. If the old stuff comes out looking like it has metal in it, or doesn't come out at all, time to tear her down. It's that simple. Even with really good brands of bearings, I will be replacing them every two years if I've been travelling much, simply because I want to enjoy my time on vacation, and not be stuck on the side of the road.

I also carry a spare hub, complete with bearings and seal, just in case. I have ordered a set of brake shoes, for the same reason. But then, of course, something else will break that I ain't got... just because... It's a TT after all.

Again... your mileage may vary...

See ya.
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