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Old 05-31-2019, 06:59 PM   #1
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Electrical limits

Hey everyone,

I have recently moved to a local farm with my TT. It is a 30amp trailer. The trailer is parked about 100ft from the house and electrical plug in.

Note: the electrical plug in is just to a standard 3 prong indoor outlet.

I am using 10g extension cord plus the 10g hook up to trailer, so I would figure about 115ft of cord.

I have the 15/30 adapter as well to cover the standard extension cord male end to the 30amp rv female.

When I plug in I am getting 115-118 volts at my outlet.

Question is will I have issues running my AC and fridge at the same time? Will I harm any of the units by using under 120volts?

Thank you!
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Old 05-31-2019, 07:19 PM   #2
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Get them both running and test the voltage. If its down below 110 volts, That's not good.
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Old 05-31-2019, 07:27 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TT_TR250RDS View Post
Hey everyone,

I have recently moved to a local farm with my TT. It is a 30amp trailer. The trailer is parked about 100ft from the house and electrical plug in.

Note: the electrical plug in is just to a standard 3 prong indoor outlet.

I am using 10g extension cord plus the 10g hook up to trailer, so I would figure about 115ft of cord.

I have the 15/30 adapter as well to cover the standard extension cord male end to the 30amp rv female.

When I plug in I am getting 115-118 volts at my outlet.

Question is will I have issues running my AC and fridge at the same time? Will I harm any of the units by using under 120volts?

Thank you!

You'll be fine as long as your voltage at the TT stays at or above 110VAC.


You need to pay close attention to the plug end connections of your extension cord. Start by spraying them with dielectric grease to prevent dissimilar metal corrosion as well as corrosion due to humidity and oxidation. Then pay attention to the heating created by a full load. Expect to trip a breaker as you exceed 15 amps of load at the TT, as the actual load at the power point (breaker) will include all of the line load and losses at the plug points.



Shade the extension cord as much as possible. Higher outdoor temperatures will cause the wire to be unable to dissipate heat. Too much heat will make the wire less efficient with carrying the load.


You would be better served to actually change the extension cord ends to true 30 amp connectors. The reason is the metal conductor is twice the size of a standard outlet, making heat dissipation much better.


If you plug into an outlet that trips often, try plugging into an outlet with no other loads on the same line, or an outlet that has a shorter homerun to the breaker panel. Remember, your residential grade outlet is possibly served with a #14 AWG wire, making for a potential fire hazard for the home or location you are plugged into. Try to find a source that is #10AWG if possible or at least #12AWG. Or if possible find a NEMA 15/50 amp plug and size down instead of up.
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Old 06-01-2019, 07:27 AM   #4
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You might be ok running 15 amps thru that 115’ of 10 gauge, I would not recommend it. Do yourself a big favor, make a 30 amp extension cord with 3, 6 gauge wires, blk, wht, and gr. Pay CLOSE attention to what color goes where. Then install a 30 amp outlet at the house on it’s own breaker.
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Old 06-01-2019, 10:31 AM   #5
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You might be ok running 15 amps thru that 115í of 10 gauge, I would not recommend it. Do yourself a big favor, make a 30 amp extension cord with 3, 6 gauge wires, blk, wht, and gr. Pay CLOSE attention to what color goes where. Then install a 30 amp outlet at the house on itís own breaker.

I agree with Spoon.
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Old 06-01-2019, 02:22 PM   #6
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The only issue is, it’s not my house. I can ask the owner how he feels about all that, but I am also no electrician.

How would I make 30 amp extension cord with 6 gauge where black and green and sheath it?

Also, what if I can hook into a 220 wash and dryer line? Could I just get an adapter to knock it down in power?
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Old 06-01-2019, 02:41 PM   #7
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"NO" on the 50amp plug.


Since it is not your place and making changes is iffy and you show 115VAC for now you are OK just monitor the voltage if below 110VAC you will have to do something.
Also for the next few days feel the plugs at both ends if they are hot you may have to do something.
You will have to limit what you use at any one time. Best to have hot water on propane or manage when you turn it on and off. You do know you can not run microwave, AC or hairdryer at the same time.
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Old 06-01-2019, 02:42 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by ret60sp View Post
You'll be fine as long as your voltage at the TT stays at or above 110VAC.


You need to pay close attention to the plug end connections of your extension cord. Start by spraying them with dielectric grease to prevent dissimilar metal corrosion as well as corrosion due to humidity and oxidation. Then pay attention to the heating created by a full load. Expect to trip a breaker as you exceed 15 amps of load at the TT, as the actual load at the power point (breaker) will include all of the line load and losses at the plug points.



Shade the extension cord as much as possible. Higher outdoor temperatures will cause the wire to be unable to dissipate heat. Too much heat will make the wire less efficient with carrying the load.


You would be better served to actually change the extension cord ends to true 30 amp connectors. The reason is the metal conductor is twice the size of a standard outlet, making heat dissipation much better.


If you plug into an outlet that trips often, try plugging into an outlet with no other loads on the same line, or an outlet that has a shorter homerun to the breaker panel. Remember, your residential grade outlet is possibly served with a #14 AWG wire, making for a potential fire hazard for the home or location you are plugged into. Try to find a source that is #10AWG if possible or at least #12AWG. Or if possible find a NEMA 15/50 amp plug and size down instead of up.

Great info! Thank you for taking the time to respond.

If I change the extension chord ends to 30amp. The one which connects to the house hold outlet still needs to be a regular 3 prong plug is so I guess in theory that area would still be a fire hazard, correct?

We found out late last night that the breaker that the outlet is plugged into is a 20amp breaker that runs the electrical fences and the basement.

I spoke briefly with the owner and there is a 30amp breaker on the panel that is not being used. The cable runs out to the barn, however something went wrong with the cable in the ground so it doesnít work. He said I can reperpose that 30amp break. Get about 6ft if cable and run it outside with a 30amp plug. I still would required to use the 100+í of 10g extension cord, but at that point can switch the ends to 30amp ends, correct? At that point it should be ok?

Or

If the owner wanted to run 220 aluminum wire to the barn. He said we can collaborate (expenses and joint time) on that and possibly set it up to the barn then with a 50amp connection outlet and I can just get the 50 amp to 30amp adaptor.

Any thoughts?
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Old 06-01-2019, 02:58 PM   #9
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The fire hazard is not just the plugs or cord ends, it's that the conductors themselves are not thick enough to carry the voltage over that length without building heat. Bigger conductor size equals less heat buildup equals less risk.
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Old 06-01-2019, 03:18 PM   #10
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Get them both running and test the voltage. If its down below 110 volts, That's not good.
Good advise, voltage drop is the killer here, when a motor load starts (like an a/c compressor) it draws more current than after it's running. If the voltage drop is severe enough, it can damage the compressors and anything else thats voltage sensitive. You also have to take into account how far from the electrical panel the outlet on the house is. Since the OP said it was on a 20 amp breaker, one would assume it is #12 wire to that point, so that must be taken into account when doing voltage drop calculations.
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Old 06-02-2019, 12:04 AM   #11
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So since the original hookup was to 20amp breaker an had other draws on it besides trailer. The simplest option at this point is to use the available 30amp breaker in the house panel, run 10 gauge wire from 30amp breaker, out to the back side of the house and into a standard outdoor 3 prong outlet. This will shorten the overall length of extension cord being used to 100’. (Numbers were wrong on original entensjkn cord measure. Length is 150’ of extension cord.)

Plus now it will be on its own 30amp breaker with no other draws besides trailer.

Does this seem like an ok option? I believe the owner will eventually still want to run 220 out to the barn right next to trailer. However Idn when, so in the mean time this seems to be best option.
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Old 06-02-2019, 12:42 AM   #12
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The option of having your own 30a circuit from the house would be a good way to go. Inexpensive and easy to do on the house end. Then #8 or preferable #6 the RV location. Direct burial cable or THWN in conduit. Put a 3' piece of 4x4 PT in a hole with a bag of concrete and mount a RV30 receptical there.

If you do the 240v run to the barn it will be more involved. A subpanel will be needed there, with a 30a branch circuit for the RV.
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Old 06-02-2019, 10:36 AM   #13
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So leveraging the following should be no problem?
-30 amp panel breaker in house
-10/3 Romax from breaker out to a standard 3 prong outlet
-100’ of 10g heavy duty extension cord
-15/30 adaptor
-Hughes autoformer (30)
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Old 06-02-2019, 10:47 AM   #14
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If your running 30 amps you shouldn't be using a 20 amp outlet. You will have a tough time wrapping the wire around it.

Run a 120 volt, 30 amp twist lock outlet. Then go from there with 30 amp boat cables to your RV cord with 1 adaptor.
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