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Old 12-12-2013, 12:26 AM   #1
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Four seasons (not the band)

My wife and I bought our first TT a year ago and loved it. We just upgraded to something quite a bit bigger since we are going to be FT'ing it for an indefinite amount of time. We purchased a 2014 Timber Ridge model by Outdoor RV and it has the "Four Seasons" package. They claim that it will hold up in the winter months to below zero temperatures (but nothing extreme). Our area sees teens to twenties at night with wind chills bringing the temperature to slightly below zero on occasion.

My question is for anyone out there who has a "four seasons" RV. How well do these actually hold up to the cold weather? Do I believe what they've told me (not my typical nature) or should I invest in a skirting option?

The Timber Ridge has lots of insulation for the living spaces and a covered underbelly with heated ducting running under the floor (and around the tanks and valves) to assist with the "Four seasons" package. I wasn't able to visually look at the underbelly since it's covered, so I'm basing this off of the manufacturer's website videos and the RV salesman.
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Old 12-12-2013, 06:32 PM   #2
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Old 12-12-2013, 07:01 PM   #3
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We all know about the salesman so be careful. Here's my experience with the phrase, "Four Seasons." Out first TT was a Heartland product and labeled Four-Seasons. The fresh water tank straps broke, and we didn't have the tank filled with water either. They filled it to test the water systems before we picked it up. I pulled the cloroplast belly covering to inspect the tank issue and noticed how poorly it was insulated. Water lines attached to steel side frame members with nothing insulating the pipes from freezing. So I called the dealer. They assured me that the underbelly was heated. So I looked further and found one 2-1/2" heater hose stuck into the underbelly. It was not ducted anywhere just stuck into the cavity about 3-4 feet away from the furnace. There was no way the heat was circulated to the front or to the back or anywhere for that matter.

So I called the manufacturer and this is what I was told by a customer service rep. "The word, 'Four-Seasons', is used very loosely in the industry." He further explained that they attempt to put some heat in the belly but that is not a guarantee that the pipes won't freeze if it gets much below 32 degrees.

This is what I learned but Tiber ridge may do a better job than Heartland did but I if you want piece of mind I would look for myself to avoid you trusting they did what they said they were going to do. I wouldn't want to experience a split line in a location that I couldn't easily get to. That would never happen at a convenient time or location.

Had we kept the TT I was going to drop the covering, wrap all water lines with heat tape, spray foam insulation where needed. Protect all water lines from the cold getting to those lines running adjacent to the side frame and assure that some ducted heat was getting under the entire area if possible. We traded after 1 year and eventually last year got back to a MH.

There are some TT's out there that boast of an Arctic package. I guess they are very well insulated but I'm not speaking from experience.

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Old 12-12-2013, 07:27 PM   #4
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Like someone just posted elsewhere on the forum, there's a big difference in a unit that can be used for weekends in the winter and one that can be used full-time in the winter. I think Outdoors RV has one of the better insulated units out there. With some of them it's just talk.

You have a heated/enclosed underbelly. All they typically do is run a duct off the furnace into the underbelly space to blow some warm air around. Not a foolproof way to prevent freezing. You could potentially still need tank heaters and need to wrap and protect piping.

Your trailer has batt insulation in the ceiling. If you use it for extended periods in the winter, I would be wary of condensation. I doubt there is a vapor barrier on the warm side of the ceiling insulation and warm moist air will condense on the underside of the roof. At a minimum, you should keep some windows and vents cracked open to move air out. If it were me, I'd get a hygrometer and monitor the humidity level inside. If it gets too high, you may need to use a dehumidifier. Cooking, bathing and bodies create a LOT of moisture.
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Old 12-12-2013, 07:38 PM   #5
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Where in the country do you want to spend 4 seasons? I would not try it in Minnesota or Wisconsin but would try it in Georgia or Texas for example.
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Old 12-13-2013, 12:42 PM   #6
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At the end of this video Outdoors Four Seasons - YouTubeit states that the plumbing is not good for below 0 degrees.
Also unless you have dual pane windows it won't be a warm as you want.
Another thing to remember is you need to run the furnace to circulate warm air around the holding tanks and valves to keep them from freezing. That could be expensive when FTiming.

Not sure why there's only sound and not video?
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Old 12-14-2013, 04:17 PM   #7
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TeJay, that's kinda what I figured. Using the " Four Seasons" package as a selling point, but not backing it up with a guarantee (not that it would hold up since you couldn't prove what temperatures you were camping in). I was hoping someone had actually tested and proved it.

Myredracer, we looked into dehumidifier with our first TT because we had heard lots of horror stories. Thanks for the reminder and the hygrometer suggestion. Will definitely be looking into that.

Tuffr2, we will be in SE Washington. Temperatures here aren't too bad. Below zero is an atypical occurrence.

Cuminsfan, thanks for the video post. I had watched it before but didn't catch the "below zero" claim. And, I had video when I watched it... Both times =)
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Old 12-14-2013, 09:50 PM   #8
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Ok - so you will be in cold weather. Yes, you should invest in the skirting and other cold weather items that help make it doable. Buy the old fashion light bulbs that produce heat to place under your trailer by the tank valves. Buy heat wrap for the water hose etc.

If you do not have dual pane windows go buy additional window insulation material.

Good luck.
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Old 12-15-2013, 10:06 PM   #9
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Northwood Arctic Fox! We have camped in 14 degree, 6in snow and blowing and were snug as bugs. They do need xtra insulation at the head end under the bed as they get cold there. All tanks and pipes are inside, we run the heat when towing to prevent freezeup. I know, someone will come and say "You're not supposed to do that!" Ya, right, I'll shoot my eye out with a Daisy BB gun if I aim right.
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Old 12-16-2013, 06:40 AM   #10
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Passin Thru - My mother was one that would say 'don't do that - you can put an eye out'. Throwing rocks, playing with sticks, shooting BB guns, fishing rods, forks, you name it. I was 12 when I realized, hey...everyone still has two eyes.

Until you see multiple campers along the roadway on fire I say keep that heat on when traveling.
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Old 12-16-2013, 07:24 AM   #11
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I would not consider the Timberline a true 4-seasons unit. Look at DRV, New Horizons, Excel, LifeStyle, and others in that class.

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Old 12-25-2013, 09:23 PM   #12
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I have been out in 30 degree weather for a weekend in my Lance 2185. Heat ducts go around the tanks and they claim if your comfortable inside none of the tanks or lines can freeze. The heater kept up just fine and we were a comfortable 72 degrees inside. Also has double pain glass.
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Old 12-26-2013, 12:21 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cadmry View Post
My wife and I bought our first TT a year ago and loved it. We just upgraded to something quite a bit bigger since we are going to be FT'ing it for an indefinite amount of time. We purchased a 2014 Timber Ridge model by Outdoor RV and it has the "Four Seasons" package. They claim that it will hold up in the winter months to below zero temperatures (but nothing extreme). Our area sees teens to twenties at night with wind chills bringing the temperature to slightly below zero on occasion.

My question is for anyone out there who has a "four seasons" RV. How well do these actually hold up to the cold weather? Do I believe what they've told me (not my typical nature) or should I invest in a skirting option?

The Timber Ridge has lots of insulation for the living spaces and a covered underbelly with heated ducting running under the floor (and around the tanks and valves) to assist with the "Four seasons" package. I wasn't able to visually look at the underbelly since it's covered, so I'm basing this off of the manufacturer's website videos and the RV salesman.
One of my daughters owns an RV park and the winters there are below freezing most nights, twenties, low teens, but seldom below that. They have many "monthlies", none have skirts and as long as the park water connection and the RV's water hose are properly heated (some heat the sewer line too) no problems. These are not 4 season units, most spend $$$ to keep their trailers warm. As mentioned, humidity is the enemy of your RV. Where are you going to be staying, if you are in an RV park and you are paying the electric, staying warm is going to cost you, if you are dry camping, can you run your forced air to heat the trailer.

We purchased a 2014 Blackstone, it is "4 seasons", we do not use the heat at night, been as low as 46 degrees in the trailer in the morning, turn on the heat and it warms up very quickly.

If you have questions about your Timber Ridge do not hesitate to call Outdoors RV in Or.. Darin (sales manager) has been very helpful and responsive to our questions, if your "Owners Manuel" is like ours, Outdoors Rv's tech staff is a great resource to get information on your trailer.
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