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Old 12-20-2014, 09:24 PM   #57
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Had a '12 Tacoma/2800 lb salem cruise lite 185rb, 55 was comfortable. Just bought a '14 Tundra 5.7 and a '14 3500 lb Amerilite 218mb, 60 will probably be comfortable for me. retired here, no rush, i love poking along
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Old 12-20-2014, 10:08 PM   #58
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We had a 25ft Arctic Fox TT. We usually kept our speed around 60-65mph for fuel economy. We have towed at 75-80mph for long Interstate stretches when we needed to make up some time.

These days we flat tow a Ford Explorer at 60-65mph for fuel economy and 75-80mph for long Interstate stretches when we needed to make up some time.
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Old 12-20-2014, 10:23 PM   #59
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No faster then the rated speed limit on my camper tires, there is too many things that can go wrong and how ugly things could get if it all got out of hand.
The other thing I have is respect for is those that are around me, not only do I have my life in my hands I also I also have yours in my hands.
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Old 12-21-2014, 11:52 AM   #60
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hmm, I will drive around 65-70 on straight aways. 60-65 on up and down hills. I always check my tires before and at intervals during the trip and when I arrive for damage or excessive wear. This next part is worth repeating, Watch the dealerships! they like to overinflate your TT tires by about 20+lbs! I can understand hitting a pothole or travelling along distance or maxing out the speed and the tires going boom.... I read the side of the TT and checked that my tires are spec to the TT. Since my TT is only going on two years my tires should be ok for a while but I will be looking soon for replacments as I won't take chances with my family. I have checked my tires at a rest stop after travelling around 70 mph for about 6 hours and found them and this is on a hot day in Florida to still be able to touch without burning my fingers. Mind you I don't always travel that fast but there are times when you have to make it around certain areas before a certain time or you sit....
Couple of observations.
Doing external visual inspection is a good practice but there is no way for you to know the level of internal structural damage that has been done to your tires. Ever wonder why all other tires (other than ST type) have life expectancy of 6 to 10 years but we see numerous examples of tires in trailer application fail after two or 3 years?
The fact that over half of trailers have one or more tire in overload is certainly one major factor. The second is the tendency of a significant number of users who choose to ignore the tire max speed rating.

HERE is a post from my Blog on Why Tires Fail. High speed, High Load and Low inflation all generate heat. Heat is the primary killer of tires.
Low inflation will many times show up in sidewall failure ("Blowout") due to excess flex (heat) being generated in the sidewall.
Belt and tread separation are primarily the result of accelerated degradation of the rubber in the belt edge area. This is due to the nature of chemical reaction rate doubling with each increase of about 20F so this in effect means you are reducing the life of a tire by 50% for each 20F increment of temperature.

RE dealership over-inflation of tires: Are you saying that your dealership is exceeding the inflation molded on the tire sidewall by 20 psi? This is a claim I have not heard from others. If this is true you need to find a different dealer and warn your friends to stay away from that dealership.

RE "maxing out the speed": Based on your statements can we conclude that you have speed rated (75 mph) LT type tires on your TT and not ST type tires?If not then clearly you have not only "maxing out the speed" but significantly exceeded the tire capability and if lucky will only pay for this action with significantly shorter tire life and hopefully not with a tire failure at highway speed.
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Old 12-21-2014, 02:45 PM   #61
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205 75R 14 tires turn 772.9 revolutions per mile, while 225 75R 15 tires turn 713.3 revolutions.

The difference is 5,960 revolutions every 100 miles. Seems like properly aired, taller tires would run cooler, regardless of speed.
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Old 12-22-2014, 08:29 AM   #62
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205 75R 14 tires turn 772.9 revolutions per mile, while 225 75R 15 tires turn 713.3 revolutions.

The difference is 5,960 revolutions every 100 miles. Seems like properly aired, taller tires would run cooler, regardless of speed.

Yes it may be true that a larger tire has fewer rev per mile the test that tires must past is not based on RPM but MPH. 65 is still the limit.

What is your engine Rev Limit? What speed do you run your engine at? Why don't you run your engine at 98% to 105% of the Red-Line?

Here is a simple experiment you can do to answer your question on speed & heat.
Take a rubber band and hold it against your lip. Now quickly stretch and relax the band. You will feel the heat generated. Even if you decrease the the distance you stretch the band by 8% you will still generate heat.
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Old 12-22-2014, 09:19 AM   #63
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Part of getting older is slower response times.

I know my response time has slowed majorly since I was a teenager, and I drive accordingly: slower, and with bigger distance between me and the vehicle ahead. *Especially* with the trailer.

And besides the generally poor quality of trailer tires, I've not been particularly impressed with our trailer's braking systems. I regularly check, and there often seems to be some issue: broken wires, greased brakes, out of adjustment. Another reason to take it easy when towing.

We tow at a max of 62 mph (100km/hr) in the right lane (or thru lane in urban areas) when legal. Slower on secondary roads. And maintain a substantial distance between us and the vehicle ahead.

On busy highways, people will speed pass and cut in front of us; that's their choice; I just slow down and let them in.
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Old 12-22-2014, 10:54 AM   #64
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A 225 turns about 8% less RPM's than a 205 at any speed. Math says a 225 @ 70mph would equal a 205 @ 65mph in revolutions.

I agree ST tires say 65 max, I just don't understand why a taller tire wouldn't give the same service up to equivalent MPH. 70 vs 65.
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Old 12-22-2014, 04:46 PM   #65
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Taller tires are usually rated for more weight than shorter tires. If you upgraded to taller, you probably have more capacity with the tires. I am not an expert, but I guess you could run faster since you wouldn't be at the tires capacity.
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Old 12-23-2014, 11:29 AM   #66
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May have to do with centrifigal force. Taller tire at same RPM would have more force than smaller tire.

Mass X Radius X Velocity = Centrifigal Force
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Old 12-23-2014, 08:11 PM   #67
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May have to do with centrifigal force. Taller tire at same RPM would have more force than smaller tire.

Mass X Radius X Velocity = Centrifigal Force
Maybe, but the force you are talking about has nothing to do with load capacity.
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Old 12-23-2014, 08:25 PM   #68
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A 225 turns about 8% less RPM's than a 205 at any speed. Math says a 225 @ 70mph would equal a 205 @ 65mph in revolutions.

I agree ST tires say 65 max, I just don't understand why a taller tire wouldn't give the same service up to equivalent MPH. 70 vs 65.

Again a larger tire has fewer rev per mile but the test that tires must pass and is designed around is not based on RPM but MPH. 65 MPH is still the limit.

And for timetogo, you need to stop worrying about tire RPM when talking about a MPH limit. Mixing Apples and Cumquats doesn't work. maybe you need to ask someone famier with Diesel engines why they cant run the same RPM as Gas engines. After all 6L Gas engine and 6L Diesel have same displacement so they should run the same RPM right? Some things physics and engineering design don't always work the way we would wish.
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Old 12-24-2014, 10:04 AM   #69
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Maybe, but the force you are talking about has nothing to do with load capacity.
I thought we were talking about speed! Nothing in the centrifical force formula would apply to the load on the tire as it does not spin around the axle. Mass would apply to the tire body, face, belts?? I have watched dragsters when they spin their tires during burnouts and when running down the track. Highway tires are subjected to the same forces, just not as radical. While they have the forces applied for very short times ours are constant for long periods.
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Old 12-24-2014, 10:32 AM   #70
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Weight on the tire is the killer, speed isn't. If a tire is rated for 65mph then it can run there all day. Take two trailers. One with 50% of the tires max load and the other at 100% of the load. Run them both at the max speed and the 100% load will wear out faster. Also the tires with the heavier load will run hotter as well. Heat creates more issues than running at the tires max mph rating.
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