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Old 10-26-2013, 11:04 PM   #1
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Light Truck Tires

Everybody seems to have poor results with off shore trailer tires. What is the problem with light truck tires? I figure a good 8 or 10 ply tire is easier to find and has a better rating than trailer tires. What are the facts on this .
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Old 10-27-2013, 12:21 AM   #2
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Truck tires tend to give a harder ride than trailer tires.
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Old 10-27-2013, 12:54 AM   #3
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I changed from ST tires to Yokohama LT tires on my 5er and never had another tire problem. Three of my friends did the same with the same results.
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Old 10-27-2013, 06:14 AM   #4
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I used Michelin XPS Ribs (LT235/85R-16E rated 3042 lbs @ 80 PSIG) on the previous 5th wheel and Michelin XTAs (215/75R-17.5J rated 4805 lbs @ 120 PSIG) on the current one. Unlike the OEM tires, I've never had a problem with the all-steel construction Michelins.

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Old 10-27-2013, 07:13 AM   #5
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The difference between the trailer tires and LT tires is the side walls on the LT tires are designed to flex more than the the trailer tires. My old 5er has passenger tires on it. they got to go for shure before we take off anywhere.
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Old 10-27-2013, 08:36 AM   #6
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I had 15" LT tires that I ran overloaded by 20% and over pressure by 10psi for 7 years without any failure. After having not one single ST tire lasting longer then 2 years before on same unit. The LTs were bought on price while STs were GY Marathon.
Never needed the spare and could drive at any speed with LTs.
Present LTs on my unit are Range G and 6 years old and I have no plans of replacing them soon.

I plan on buying one new one for spare that has a bad cut going on 2 years while not loosing air. Not bad for Chinese tires.

Sailun tires will be my next ones from Simple Tires.
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Old 10-27-2013, 08:44 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jenandjon View Post
The difference between the trailer tires and LT tires is the side walls on the LT tires are designed to flex more than the the trailer tires. My old 5er has passenger tires on it. they got to go for shure before we take off anywhere.
Passenger (P) tires are a whole different breed than light truck (LT) tires. Many 5th wheels were supplied with LT tires - my previous 5th wheel, for instance, came with LT235/85R-16E Goodyear Wrangler HTs. Many LT tires (the Michelin XPS Ribs, for instance) are rated for all-position service; this includes steer axle, drive axle and trailer. Just because a tire is designated as an LT size doesn't mean that it's not suitable for trailer service. An example is the LT235/85R-16G Goodyear G614 RST which is a TRAILER ONLY tire.

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Old 10-27-2013, 09:42 AM   #8
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If an LT (say XPS Ribs) were to blow, couldn't they cause more damage being all steel?
Not saying they will, just if. I used XPS ribs on my truck and liked them.
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Old 10-27-2013, 09:45 AM   #9
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Hypothetically, I suppose, but I've never had a Michelin blow or throw a tread. My choice is to run tires that don't give problems rather than those that minimize the problem when (not if) they fail.

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Old 10-27-2013, 10:50 AM   #10
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My observation has been, the tires on most, if not all RVs is that they have the min tire to carry the GVWR (if the RV is loaded just right). IMHO if you have enough cap over your load you won't have too much trouble. My TT's tires in theory will carry the GVWR IF there is at least 12%on the tongue. Lucky for me, my traveling weight is 1400 under GVWR. I have had no tire problem in 15 yrs that we have had the TT and it has ST tires. If that had not been the case, I probably would have gotten LT tires that had more cap than needed and run the tire pressure near the pressure needed (per tire pressure chart)for my load for a better ride.
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Old 10-27-2013, 07:47 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akibase View Post
Everybody seems to have poor results with off shore trailer tires. What is the problem with light truck tires? I figure a good 8 or 10 ply tire is easier to find and has a better rating than trailer tires. What are the facts on this .


Those of you that read some of my posts must know I can’t resist the challenge a statement like this poses.

I only write my tire posts from regulations, tire industry standards and tire safety materials from sources such as the NHTSA or the RMA. If you disagree with what I’ve posted I’ll be glad to provide a reference.

First let’s look at how the DOT describes the light truck tire:

“Light Truck (LT) tire means a tire designated by its manufacturer as primarily intended for use on lightweight trucks or multipurpose passenger vehicles.” That’s not to say they cannot be used on RV trailer axles. It just reaffirms it’s intended market. Today (2013) there are few exceptions and they can best be described as hybrid tires for “trailer service only”

Trailer manufacturers have the ultimate responsibility for selecting the tires and rims for your trailer. They are also tasked by the DOT to set the correct recommended (cold) tire pressure (s) for the Original Equipment (E) tires.

Even though there are more and more LT tire sizes being introduced to the market they still lag behind in being able to replace many sizes and load capacities provided with the Special Trailer (ST) tire. Because an owner convinces himself/herself that a lower load capacity tire will work well for them doesn’t make the decision to use such tires a safe one.

Many RV trailers have been designed for specific tire size fitments. In other words, other tire sizes, even close ones will not work. There are minimum clearances such as between the tire thread and trailer floor boarding and between tandem tires that must be met. It’s clear that the trailer manufacturer only wanted the OE tires to fit. On smaller travel trailers there may be room for larger tires but there are few to be found that will have the load capacity of the OE tires. Then there are other trailer manufacturers of heavier trailers that will manipulate the vehicle’s GAWR and GVWR so they can use a particular tire. In some of those instances there are zero LT tires to fit the vehicle’s GAWR without upgrading the whole tire/rim assembly.

Today (2013) there are few states that have adopted an active vehicle inspection system for RV trailers. States looking for a revenue source may soon find the RV trailer inspection to be productive for them. Don’t leave Uncle out of that. They already have the hardware in place. An extra scale and a few employees to do the inspections might look profitable to Uncle pretty soon.

So, bottom line. Yes LT tires can replace ST tires. The LT tires must have equal or greater load capacity than the OE tires described on your trailer’s certification label, tire placard, or in it’s owner’s manual. The tires must be able to fit into your trailer’s wheelwell with acceptable clearances. When using a plus sized tire you will have to establish a new recommended tire pressure. The minimum accepted pressure will be that which will allow the replacement tire to equal or exceed the load capacity of the OE tire. A auxiliary tire placard should depict the new recommended tire pressures and be placed adjacent to the original tire placard. You should also make a notation in the vehicle’s owner’s manual as to the new tire size and recommended tire pressures.

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Old 10-27-2013, 07:56 PM   #12
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RIBS

Another vote for Michelin RIBS.

Every brand of ST tires I've ever used had problems. The worst were Goodyear Marathons.
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Old 10-27-2013, 07:59 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by jenandjon View Post
The difference between the trailer tires and LT tires is the side walls on the LT tires are designed to flex more than the the trailer tires. My old 5er has passenger tires on it. they got to go for shure before we take off anywhere.
Information post:

The following quote comes from a DOT regulation for vehicles 10,000 pounds or less. Because the same regulation also allows Passenger tires to be derated for trailer axle service the 10K is a limiting factor.

“Passenger car tire means a tire intended for use on passenger cars, multipurpose passenger vehicles, and trucks, that have a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of 10,000 pounds or less.”
 

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Old 10-27-2013, 08:18 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FastEagle View Post
Information post:

The following quote comes from a DOT regulation for vehicles 10,000 pounds or less. Because the same regulation also allows Passenger tires to be derated for trailer axle service the 10K is a limiting factor.

“Passenger car tire means a tire intended for use on passenger cars, multipurpose passenger vehicles, and trucks, that have a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of 10,000 pounds or less.”
 

FastEagle

SO I am probably ok if it weighs less than 10,000 lbs? The passenger tires were on it when I bought it.
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