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Old 10-07-2014, 09:59 PM   #15
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We have an ODK, tall fridge w/a freezer bay, sink, 2 burner stove, cabinets. After 4 yrs, its hard to imagine camping without it.

We cook outside alot so it holds the day's grillables, kids drinks, adult bevs. We also freeze 14 or so bottles of water daily for use as ice on the boat or coolers.

Nice to have the convience of the sink to wash hands while cooking, etc. It keeps folks from going in and out all day.

Rubber roof maintenance is easy and repairs are easy and rock solid.
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Old 10-08-2014, 06:11 AM   #16
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Thanks for all the help. I know this is a huge topic on all the message boards. WE have a coleman pop-up right now and have had it for about 4 years and have camped all over Nebraska and use it couple times a month besides vacations. I am looking at the Premier with outdoor kitchen. I do all of my cooking on dutch oven and grilling. Good camper/bad what are your thought. Anyone have a outdoor kitchen?

Here's another question plastic roof or rubber?
My Winnebago has both gel coat fiberglass and an outdoor kitchen... and bunks for the kids. Love the kitchen and highly recommend. Those were items we looked for when shopping. Depending on what dealers are near you (within 2 hrs or so), look at the Winnebago, Coleman, Kodiak, Outback, Surveyor and maybe Sunset trail. They all offer a great verity of floor plans with nice features, etc. You already mentioned Premier, which we looked at as well, but couldn't find the right layout and weight combination. I think they all have a radius, walk-on, rubber roof.
Good luck and keep us posted.
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Old 10-08-2014, 07:46 AM   #17
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I'm a happy Winnebago 2201DS trailer owner with an outdoor kitchen. And, it has a huge amount of storage space....the best that I could find in any 26-27' trailer and I searched every floorplan I could find. IMHO, gelcoat fiberlass will definitely better resist hail damage than aluminum, and I find it much easier to clean and maintain. But, you do have to be very careful about maintenance of seams to avoid any water damage as water damage would be expensive to repair.
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Old 10-08-2014, 08:11 PM   #18
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I would have to say the fiberglass is heavier , but I'm no expert....
Stick and tin are usually heavier because they are cheaper to build with all wood frames. Fiberglass bonded with all aluminum framing and foam insulation is much stronger and the total package will probably be lighter. i have a 31' all aluminum frame (walls, floor, roof) and it weighs only 6700 pounds. A stick and tin that I looked at in the same lenghth weighed 9000 pounds.

Then there is the rot factor with wood.....
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Old 10-10-2014, 10:10 AM   #19
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Interesting, my 35' wood frame/alum sided, two-slide bunkhouse w/outdoor kitchen appliances is 7700# dry
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Old 10-10-2014, 10:22 AM   #20
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Stick and tin are usually heavier because they are cheaper to build with all wood frames. Fiberglass bonded with all aluminum framing and foam insulation is much stronger and the total package will probably be lighter. i have a 31' all aluminum frame (walls, floor, roof) and it weighs only 6700 pounds. A stick and tin that I looked at in the same lenghth weighed 9000 pounds.

Then there is the rot factor with wood.....
That weight seems off to me. I have a 34.5' total length with aluminum siding and 2 large slides that weighs 7952 on the yellow sticker. We went with aluminum because of the large number of trailers we see- even newer ones- that have delam. It is expensive to repair and I don't think insurance would cover it. IF I get hail damage, I have insurance that will cover it. Most delam is caused by a leak. If ANY seam, window, vent opening, etc. leaks, you will encounter delam at some point. If you are anal about maintenance and keep all seams in good order, you can likely avoid delam for the most part. The fiberglass does look good, but it require extra maintenance that many people don't seem to do.
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Old 10-10-2014, 11:06 AM   #21
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That weight seems off to me. I have a 34.5' total length with aluminum siding and 2 large slides that weighs 7952 on the yellow sticker. We went with aluminum because of the large number of trailers we see- even newer ones- that have delam. It is expensive to repair and I don't think insurance would cover it. IF I get hail damage, I have insurance that will cover it. Most delam is caused by a leak. If ANY seam, window, vent opening, etc. leaks, you will encounter delam at some point. If you are anal about maintenance and keep all seams in good order, you can likely avoid delam for the most part. The fiberglass does look good, but it require extra maintenance that many people don't seem to do.

You must live where people don't take care of or buy poorly made FG trailers. I very rarely see delam. And when I do it's mostly older Keystone Outback TT's.

Large number of trailers with delam? Really, are you serious? You have to remember that it depends on where you see ripples. The rear and front of some FG trailers aren't vacuum bonded like the sides. The front is just laid over the curved framing. The rears are sandwiched together with the windows or whatever else is in the wall. That's the way our Heartland Northtrail was made. That allowed the front to get wavy and the rear wall had some puckers too. It's not delam, it's just the FG and Luan puckering. It's not the FG separating from the Luan. You can't lump all FG trailers into "large numbers of delam". I dare you to find delam in any of the nicer FG built trailers.
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Old 10-10-2014, 12:10 PM   #22
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You must live where people don't take care of or buy poorly made FG trailers. I very rarely see delam. And when I do it's mostly older Keystone Outback TT's.

Large number of trailers with delam? Really, are you serious? You have to remember that it depends on where you see ripples. The rear and front of some FG trailers aren't vacuum bonded like the sides. The front is just laid over the curved framing. The rears are sandwiched together with the windows or whatever else is in the wall. That's the way our Heartland Northtrail was made. That allowed the front to get wavy and the rear wall had some puckers too. It's not delam, it's just the FG and Luan puckering. It's not the FG separating from the Luan. You can't lump all FG trailers into "large numbers of delam". I dare you to find delam in any of the nicer FG built trailers.
Nicer trailers have a molded fiberglass front cap that takes care of that problem. The back of my rig is flat vacuum bonded like my sidewalls.
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Old 10-10-2014, 12:14 PM   #23
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That weight seems off to me. I have a 34.5' total length with aluminum siding and 2 large slides that weighs 7952 on the yellow sticker. We went with aluminum because of the large number of trailers we see- even newer ones- that have delam. It is expensive to repair and I don't think insurance would cover it. IF I get hail damage, I have insurance that will cover it. Most delam is caused by a leak. If ANY seam, window, vent opening, etc. leaks, you will encounter delam at some point. If you are anal about maintenance and keep all seams in good order, you can likely avoid delam for the most part. The fiberglass does look good, but it require extra maintenance that many people don't seem to do.
My 31' is 36 foot overall. It has two large slides and weighs 6700#on the yellow sticker. 1200 pound savings means I can tow with my F150 vs going up to F250 and maybe diesel. Mine is 100% aluminum frame.
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Old 10-11-2014, 12:36 PM   #24
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Opinions are like shirt pockets we all have one.....

My experience:

1990 Pinnacle class A motor home. Filon sided wood frame built by Airstream. Owned for 10 years and never a problem with de lamination. No controls on environment where bonding was done.


2001 Excel 28 RGO, from the number one rated 5th wheel manufacturer in the business according to RV Consumer Reports. Delamination cost me $6,000 to fix at the factory. I've toured the factory twice once in the fall and once in the summer. The process of glueing the Filon to the wood frame was conducted in uncontrolled environment. No controls on humidity and temp other than comfort heat and cooling for employees.

Current trailer is 2007 Nash 22GQ, aluminum sides, front and back. Wood frame with stapled attachment on siding.

I went with aluminum siding because my insurance would not cover the delam on my Excel. If I have damage on the aluminum they will cover any loss minus my deductible.

As to the comments about wood framed trailers being the cheap way to go, the poster has evidently not ever studied what Nash owners have to say. You get what you pay for, and you will pay a bunch for a Nash.
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Old 10-14-2014, 10:42 AM   #25
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You must live where people don't take care of or buy poorly made FG trailers. I very rarely see delam. And when I do it's mostly older Keystone Outback TT's.

Large number of trailers with delam? Really, are you serious? You have to remember that it depends on where you see ripples. The rear and front of some FG trailers aren't vacuum bonded like the sides. The front is just laid over the curved framing. The rears are sandwiched together with the windows or whatever else is in the wall. That's the way our Heartland Northtrail was made. That allowed the front to get wavy and the rear wall had some puckers too. It's not delam, it's just the FG and Luan puckering. It's not the FG separating from the Luan. You can't lump all FG trailers into "large numbers of delam". I dare you to find delam in any of the nicer FG built trailers.
Actually, yes I am serious. You need to understand that if ANY water leaks you will experience delam. My theory is that the vast majority of owners don't inspect the roof of their trailers very often, end up getting a small leak and delam begins. Casual observation indicates that delam becomes more prone after a rig is in the 5-7 year old range. I suspect that is about how long it takes for the caulk seams to begin deteriorating and allowing leaks.
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Old 10-15-2014, 08:48 AM   #26
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Actually, yes I am serious. You need to understand that if ANY water leaks you will experience delam. My theory is that the vast majority of owners don't inspect the roof of their trailers very often, end up getting a small leak and delam begins. Casual observation indicates that delam becomes more prone after a rig is in the 5-7 year old range. I suspect that is about how long it takes for the caulk seams to begin deteriorating and allowing leaks.
So now your blaming delam on the owner and not the manufacturer. You will not get delam if the trailer is maintained properly.

It's not the manufacturers fault that after 7 years it develops delam cause the owner didn't inspect it and do the necessary maintenance. Same thing will happen with the tin trailer, you'll have wood rot which is worse that delam. With delam it's just cosmetic. With wood rot your trailer is falling apart.
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Old 10-16-2014, 07:58 AM   #27
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So now your blaming delam on the owner and not the manufacturer. You will not get delam if the trailer is maintained properly.

It's not the manufacturers fault that after 7 years it develops delam cause the owner didn't inspect it and do the necessary maintenance. Same thing will happen with the tin trailer, you'll have wood rot which is worse that delam. With delam it's just cosmetic. With wood rot your trailer is falling apart.
Actually, you'll have wood rot AND delam on a fiberglass trailer. Plus, it doesn't have to be a large leak at all to begin delam. Once it starts, it continues to grow. I'll also add that I've been in many new trailers that were leaking on the dealers lot. So, while I believe that the majority of cases of delam are from lack of owner maintenance, leaks on new trailers are pretty common as well.

Edit: Most fiberglass trailers have aluminum framing, but the walls have a sheet of luan on the inside and outside that will rot.
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Old 10-16-2014, 10:45 AM   #28
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Actually, you'll have wood rot AND delam on a fiberglass trailer. Plus, it doesn't have to be a large leak at all to begin delam. Once it starts, it continues to grow. I'll also add that I've been in many new trailers that were leaking on the dealers lot. So, while I believe that the majority of cases of delam are from lack of owner maintenance, leaks on new trailers are pretty common as well.

Edit: Most fiberglass trailers have aluminum framing, but the walls have a sheet of luan on the inside and outside that will rot.
Do you know if any manufactures make high end 5th wheels rated for full timing that have wood framing and corrugated aluminum sides? I haven't seen any. I wonder why.
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