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Old 07-07-2014, 08:55 PM   #43
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On our first night away from home, a friendly neighbor came around to visit and this subject came up. His take was that if a tire blows, it could shred a propane line and cause a fire destroying the trailer. He claimed he had actually seen it on someone's outfit. Anyway, I am with most and I will take my chances... I like a cold fridge and I guess that's one reason I have insurance. Still a very long shot of it ever happening.
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Old 07-08-2014, 07:31 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jesilvas View Post
You might want to see if you need a Dometic refr safety recall kit.
Thanks for the heads-up. I checked and mine is not under any recall.

I have a indoor/outdoor thermometer with a remote sensor that I use to keep tabs on my fridge temp while traveling. With the fridge off, it only takes a few hours for the temp inside to start to rise to the danger zone. Maybe your fridges are insulated better than mine, but I lose about 2 degrees F an hour in hot weather, so if I start out at 33 degrees (the lowest I can before things start to freeze) I only have 3-4 hrs of travel time before the internal air temp reaches 40 degrees. Since I often travel all day to get where I'm going this is not sufficient.

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Old 07-08-2014, 09:22 AM   #45
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Waiting for a fridge to cool down is worse than watching the grass grow.
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Old 07-08-2014, 09:44 AM   #46
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It is well acknowledged that propane refrigerators can operate while in motion. Shields can be added to prevent wind from blowing out the flame. We can do a lot to keep the refrigerator operating - these ideas are well documented. However, I travel with the propane turned off.

A safety concern arises when equipment is not operating correctly or is malfunctioning. Propane (being the most consumer available flammable material) is heavier than air. When propane is released - it will sink and pool on the ground. This is a problem mainly when stopped (such as refueling or in stop & go traffic or on a ferry) where the fuel would not disburse. If un-burnt propane is released it will sink and spread until it finds a heat source - we know what happens after that. Most recently, in Philadelphia a food truck propane tank released gas where an automobile (with a hot muffler) drove through the cloud igniting the gas.

Propane leak caused Philly food truck fireball

The issue isn't with equipment operating correctly - the issue is in abnormal (or) incorrect operation (or) after a TT accident where the propane lines could be cut.

Everyone can chose how they leave this world, just don't take me too; I want more camping before I go.
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Old 07-08-2014, 06:14 PM   #47
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As far as a rapid dicharge of propane in an mishap, most, if not all, have a limiter at the regulator that prevents that.


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Old 07-08-2014, 11:39 PM   #48
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As far as a rapid dicharge of propane in an mishap, most, if not all, have a limiter at the regulator that prevents that.


Jim
Not disagreeing with the statement but . . . like all things the limiter is man made.

Chances of accident, etc are extemely small but still there. Airplanes are not supposed to crash, boats are not supposed to sink, brakes are supposed to work.

I believe those who travel with open propane and pilot lights lit are very safe. Recently there was an RV fire at a service station caused by the fridge according to the fire marshall. True only one incident but their motorhome and possessions in it are gone.
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Old 07-09-2014, 03:53 AM   #49
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Just a question, as far as a propane line being cut by a tire being blown out even if fridge was off and tank was off wouldn't the lines still contain propane? Or should you somehow purge the gas from the lines as well? Not trying to be a smart a$$ seriously curious!


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Old 07-09-2014, 07:52 AM   #50
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Here's some fire tips if you really want to reduce your chances of experiencing an RV fire. According to an article I read, most RV fires come from a 12v short, so check all 12v connections before and after each trip. Tire fires are the second largest risk, at 20%, caused by faulty brakes and tires rubbing the fender well or each other, usually after a blow-out.

* Batteries produce explosive gases. Keep flame, cigarettes, and sparks away. Be sure your battery compartment is properly vented. Keep vent caps tight and level. Check your battery monthly. Replace swollen batteries immediately. Use extreme care when handling batteries-they can explode.
* Spontaneous combustion can occur in damp charcoal. Buy charcoal fresh, keep it dry, and store it in a covered metal container. Rags soiled with auto wax or cleaners that contain petroleum products or other oil-based cleaning materials can also spontaneously combust if disposed of in a combustible container. Put dirty cleaning rags in a metal container with a lid.
RV Safety Issues

Regardless just remember that there are 76 million casses of food poisoning ach year in the US. The CDC estimates that we all suffer a 1 in 6 chance of getting it. If food temperatures remain in the danger zone (40-140 degrees) for 4 hours it will allow bacteria to grow, contaminating the food, resulting in illness. Choose your poison. But rationally, what's a greater probability, traveling all day without your fridge running, allowing the temperature to rise too high causing food poisoning (a 1 in 6 chance on average according to the CDC, resulting in 5,000 US deaths each year.) or an RV fire from the fridge being left on while traveling?

What are your chances of being involved in an RV fire? Statistics state that 6,300 RV fires occur each year, more than half erupt while the RV is parked. So roughly 3,000 RV fires that occur each year while traveling divided by the number of rvs on the road 27 million (400,000 new ones get sold each year) = 1 in 9,000 chance of having an RV fire while traveling. This includes all RVs, including those self-powered ones which have a higher chance of catching fire because of more fuel and ignition sources present.

RV Fire Safety

Which risk would you rather take? A 1 in 6 chance of getting food poisoning or 1 in 9,000 chance of an rv fire while traveling (most of which are caused by other sources, such as 12v shorts, faulty brakes, rubbing tires and even damp charcoal or oily rags - not propane leaks.)

Want to be Mr. Safety, minimizing all risks? Unload your fridge and pack your food in an ice chest with plenty of ice, add dry ice or a couple gallons of frozen water bottles to your fridge while traveling more than 4 hours to ensure your food never reaches the danger zone.

For fire safety: Remove all old charcoal and rags from your camper. Replace tires every 6 years. Inspect your brakes, wheel bearings and air up your tires to manufacturer specs before every trip. Clean your refrigerator flue of wasp nests, spider webs and debris (the number one cause of fridge fires) before each trip and test for proper functioning on propane before you leave. Check all propane fittings for leaks and ensure all valves are closed before you travel.

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Old 07-09-2014, 08:08 PM   #51
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My Dometic never shuts off. Now I am sure of doing it right.
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Old 07-14-2014, 11:40 PM   #52
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Just a question, as far as a propane line being cut by a tire being blown out even if fridge was off and tank was off wouldn't the lines still contain propane? Or should you somehow purge the gas from the lines as well? Not trying to be a smart a$$ seriously curious!


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And besides, aren't the lines solid iron pipe under your rv?
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Old 07-15-2014, 06:56 AM   #53
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Actually, the lines on our trailer (Shadow Cruiser) are rubber or something flexible. Solid black iron piping will be a feature on our next rig, for sure.
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Old 07-15-2014, 09:25 AM   #54
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I leave mine on while on the road, even while re-fueling. The trailer is usually far from the pump I'm using.
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Old 07-15-2014, 09:40 AM   #55
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I would like to learn more about:

1) Checking 12volt connections. Procedures and what to look for.
2) Battery inspection. how much swelling constitutes a problem?
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Old 07-15-2014, 07:21 PM   #56
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I would like to learn more about:

1) Checking 12volt connections. Procedures and what to look for.
2) Battery inspection. how much swelling constitutes a problem?
Ummm, replied to wrong post?
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