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Old 07-28-2015, 02:27 PM   #43
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That is a very good suggestion! I had thought about buying one of those ShelterLogic carports. I have to go through the building permit process to build a carport where I live and that can be quite a hassle. But I don't believe a permit is required for one of the more temporary shelters. Also, given that the only places I am going to be parking the trailer are either at my daughter's home or here, I could relocate the shelter if need be..I think. The cost of a shelter should be less than the repairs I am looking at. It might also buy me some time with winter approaching to delay performing repairs until it is necessary. Has anyone here used one of these shelters before? I am not even sure they make them for RV/trailers, just remember seeing them. The more expensive shelters, either the metal ones or having one built, might cost me more money then I have to spend right now. Any suggestions on a shelter would be much appreciated.

Thanks for the idea. Had never given that a great deal of thought before.

Terry
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Old 07-28-2015, 02:30 PM   #44
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Well I would guess that the most important thing to consider, which is true of any project, is the cost of materials, and that would have to include shipping costs. While tools can be rented or purchased if inexpensive enough, material can be costly. If it would cost that much money to ship EPDM material (and since I am on the west coast and the company that sells that is on the East coast), it could put a roof rebuild into the too expensive to do category. At least for now. Something to consider. And thank you for pointing that out to me. I have to be diligent in costing everything out no matter which path I go down.

Many thanks, Terry
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Old 07-28-2015, 02:31 PM   #45
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GeneCop...I should have added to my earlier post to your reply...have you ever rebuilt a roof before? Or did you find the material (with shipping costs) simply too expensive to consider?

Thanks again, Terry
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Old 07-28-2015, 02:34 PM   #46
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Vallance, I too liked the idea of a carport. Unfortunately, the cost might be prohibitive unless someone can suggest a method for building one that is relatively inexpensive. The ones I have looked at (the metal ones) appeared to be close to $1000. But I will continue to explore the idea. I do know there is a carport outside my daughter's home, but I don't believe it was constructed with anything but for car parking, so is probably not tall enough. I will ask her if she can measure it though. You never know.

But I too liked the notion.

Thanks for your vote...LOL

Terry
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Old 07-28-2015, 08:09 PM   #47
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Another, simpler, way to construct the roof would be to purchase 2x4x8' wood from lowes and simply use a template and jigsaw to cut arches in them. Then simply drill large holes to accommodate wires. Use hardy boards on the inside and OSB on the top. Cover with a rubber membrane and seal. Would probably cost less and be much stronger that my first suggestion. It would shave a lot of time off of the product as well as cost.

Don't look at your roof as some technically engineered, complex component. If you look at it as a cheaply designed yet function structure engineered purely with as little cost and materials in mind, then you can approach a rebuild process from a "anything I do will be better and stronger than what they did" perspective.
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Old 07-28-2015, 08:23 PM   #48
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Yes I have rebuilt many a roof, in addition to the obvious costs there are several misc costs that add up quickly, large Heavy items like EPDM will be shipped, shipping these heavy items will cost....
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Old 07-29-2015, 01:01 AM   #49
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Thank you for you suggestion with regard to a simpler less expensive approach to building a roof. I do appreciate it IronCobra. But I also must consider what GeneCop says with regard to the costs. You have both apparently built new roofs while I have not. So your experience is not to be questioned. However, I must go into this project with eyes wide open and pocketbook wide open as well (as it were). So, before I attempt to even contemplate either a patch repair type of job or a completely new roof, I must contemplate seriously all of the costs involved. While a new roof might be ideal, my budget might not allow for that kind of expense. I will need to find out how much it would cost for the EPDM material...including shipping. I contacted the manufacturer of EPDM to discuss repairing the roof. They helped me to understand what I was up against and felt it could be repaired. However, since I have a Fleetwood with an Alpha roof, I will need to make sure to use a primer before using a rubber roofing material. So, another step and cost I will need to undertake. Whew...not easy this task, especially for a newbie such as myself.

Thanks as always for your comments and suggestions.

Terry
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Old 08-23-2015, 05:47 PM   #50
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Updating on last month's post

Hello everyone...I wanted to provide an update on things with regard to repairing my roof.

First, I just want to say that I really really appreciate all of the helpful comments to my post.

Being a newbie to the RV world has been thrilling AND EXHAUSTING.

I am taking pictures as I progress, but RV repair work came to a screeching halt sue to a family tragedy (my nephew was murdered...I can barely say the words) and now my daughter has experienced a dire emergency. So, that means I have to shortcut my RV repairs and travel to Eastern Washington with the trailer (such as it is). I have the ceiling and half of the walls in the bedroom dismantled but have not removed the OSB in the ceiling, unless it crumbled off. My neighbor who was going to help me with the roof got sidelined so I went ahead and started on the interior.

So, here is what I am dealing with:

1) Bedroom interior - I have ripped out the ceiling sections until I got to good OSB. I ripped out the sidewalls and within the side cabinets until I got past the bad sections. As you can see from the pictures, the worst sections are at the front of the trailer. The side walls are in pretty good shape except again near the front.

...As you can see, I am dealing with wood rot and some mold (some of the insulation I pulled out was wet and blackened). I was planning on using a wood rot repair. I have priced out two products (Elmers Wood Repair System - $19 for 12 oz and Git Rot Epoxy $22 for 4 oz). Any suggestions or recommendations? I also will have to repair one or two of the braces with support.

...As for the mold - Do you recommend I scrub this all down before rebuilding it?

...Do you have any recommendations on insulation? I pulled out some stuff that looked like cotton batting, some plain old insulation and some that looked to have a plastic backing on it. Since I will be living in this rig during bad weather, I want to use as good of an insulation as possible.

...Then I will need to add insulation board and finally paneling. Not sure if that should be glued or stapled. The paneling on the ceiling and walls seemed to be the same stuff.

Roof Repair - On the positive side, the section of bad roof in the bedroom is much smaller than I had expected. I had anticipated a 4' x 8' section but it is more like 2' x 8'.

...However, the roof damage seems to extend under the cap which I guess I will need to peel back to affect repairs. Right?

...My plan for a temporary fix is to clean the roof and patch the holes, including this large one. I was going to either peel back the EPDM, cut out and replace the damaged OSB and then glue the EPDM back down or I will have to replace that section of roof with a new piece of rubber roof. I hope it is the former as I don't know how to replace a section of the EPDM (if that is possible for such a large spot). Any thoughts on this approach?

...There may be a small hole in the back which will need repairing. Hopefully the wood under it is still sound.

...The rest of the roof is not that bad actually. Surprised the heck out of me. Mostly just the seams are bad. So I was going to clean that all up and use Eternabond tape over them.

...Reapplying a rubber roof will need to come later as the weather is catching up to me.

I have about two weeks to accomplish as much as possible before I have to leave and my pocket book is sadly depleted because of the aforementioned crises. I can continue repairs once I get to Eastern WA (and hope I don't encounter any wildfires).

So, I am going back to an earlier suggestion, which is to tarp it.

...Not knowing how bad the roof might be in other sections, although nothing stands out, I want to cover it to make sure that I don't aggravate any of those conditions. And I am going to need to be able to live in it...at least for a while. Housing in a college town is notoriously overpriced...if you can even find it.

...Any suggestions on what tarp to use?

As for approach - I have to decide if I can continue working on the interior, so that it is liveable and delay the roof work or focus first on patching the roof before doing interior work?

Any thoughts on that?

Any thoughts, ideas or suggestion are as always not only very much appreciated but also very much needed.

Warm regards and Happy RVing to you all for the remainder of the summer,

Terry
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Old 08-23-2015, 10:26 PM   #51
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Terry,
Not sure how to handle all your serious family problems--terrible situation.
Also not sure how you can get the trailer into traveling condition in just 2 weeks.
I just did some rotten wood work with the Elmers product--found it very hard to work with, not pliable enough to force into plywood layers. Perhaps the other product might be better. Also, check into the MinWax type of wood restoration products. As far as the the OSB replacement--you just have to have good support under the new wood, each side of a panel has to be on a rafter or a crossmember.
Hope it all works out.
Joe
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Old 08-23-2015, 11:05 PM   #52
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Thanks Joe for the feedback. Taking one day at a time. I figure that if the rainy weather can hold back a bit then I can tarp the roof and finish up the interior work within two weeks, then tackle the roof.

Thanks for your input on the Elmers product. I had read good things about Git Rot so I might try that. I will also check out the MinWax stuff.

Yeah, I figure that the OSB needs good support under it. Not sure what you meant about each side of a panel being on a brace or crossbar. I thought the layers if you viewed it beginning from the top would be: rubber roof, OSB, wood support bracing, insulation, insulation board and then paneling.

This is a lot of work alright but fortunately I will be able to continue working on the trailer at my daughter's house.

Best to you, Terry
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Old 08-24-2015, 07:56 AM   #53
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Terry,
I meant that each EDGE of an OSB panel needs to be supported--sorry that I said 'side', I think you have this covered by "I figure that the OSB needs good support under it"
Joe
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Old 08-24-2015, 03:17 PM   #54
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I have a quick question regarding this whole entire mess of a trailer. Since it appears that my main problem started with a leak right over the bedroom which is located at the front of the trailer, which then leaked into the ceiling and down into the interior walls...what are the chances that there is rotten wood and wet insulation on the exterior walls as well? I am thinking better than 50/50.
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