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Old 06-21-2012, 08:01 AM   #15
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Yeah, I know. I'm a day late and a dollar short, but I'll reply anyway.

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The tires on the trailer now are Carlisle branded ST205/75R15 from 2006. The wheels are 15x5.0. ...
I've had two different trailers with ST205/75R15C tires. For an 8,000-pound trailer, those tires are at the limits of their weight capacity when inflated to their max of 50 PSI. So they're likely to blow out on long, high-speed trips towing at the tire's max speed of 65 MPH.

After blowing out three different tires on my 5er, I replaced the wheels with 15x6 wheels and the tires with Maxxis ST225/75R15D, which have 2,540 weight capacity at 65 PSI. So 4 tires are rated to handle combined trailer axle weight over 10,000 pounds. That's enough fudge factor that I've never had a blowout on those tires on my 8,000-pound 5er in about 100,000 towing miles over 11 years.
M8008 ST Radial

On another trailer, I went even further and replaced the ST205/75R15C tires with Maxxis ST225/75R15E (so-called 10 ply), with 2,830 pounds weight capacity per tire @ 80 PSI. Over 11,000 pounds combined axle weight capacity, which is overkill for that trailer. But I don't want to take a chance on a blowout on the trailer when a hundred miles from the nearest Discount Tire store late on a Saturday night when the store is closed anyway.

Quote:
I have looked into getting 16" rims, but am not sure it is the best option. If I stick with the 15" rims, can I still put on LT tires, or am I limited to STs?
The space in the wheelwells of the trailer may not allow 16" tires. And you may not even have enough room to go from ST205 to ST225 tires. But if you have room for them, ST and LT tires require the same rims.

In the past, LT tires were used by trailer manufacturers if the size required was not available in an ST tire. So until recently, trailers with 15" tires usually came with ST tires, but heavier trailers with 16" tires usually came with LT tires because ST tires were not available in 16" sizes.

However, not all LT tires are created equal. If you put LT tires on a trailer, you want to be sure the tire is rated for commercial truck service as an "all position" tire. All position means rated for either the steer axle, the drive axle, or the trailer axle. Most LT tires are not rated as an all-position tire. And the few that are are expensive. For example, Michelin XPS is the only LT Michelin that's included on the MichelinTruck website and rated as an all-position tire. The Michelin LTX tires are wonderful tires for a pickup, but not for a trailer. Goodyear also makes one expensive 16" tire that's rated as an all-position truck tire, but I'm not a Goodyear fan so I don't remember the exact name of it. The key is all-steel construction, with not only steel belts but also steel cords in the sidewall.

For your use, there is no need for a tire with more weight capacity than ST225/75R15E. And Michelin XPS tires cost even more than Maxxis trailer tires. So order new 15x6" wheels from
TrailerParts.com Rims & Wheels
and order the Maxxis ST225/75R15D or E from Discount tire and you'll be good to go.

However, there is one condition where the Michelin XPS 16" tires could be justified. Around here the interstate speed limit is 75, and a few miles further west it's 80 MPH. And I often see idiots towing RV trailers or horse trailers or race trailers at over 80 MPH. For those speeds, ST tires are not good. So spend the big bucks for new wheels and Michelin XPS tires which have a speed rating of "Q", which is 99 MPH.

MichelinMan website, for LT tires:
XPS Rib | Michelin Tires

MichelinTruck website, for commercial truck tires:
http://www.michelintruck.com/micheli...?tread=XPS RIB
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Old 06-21-2012, 09:45 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by SmokeyWren
Yeah, I know. I'm a day late and a dollar short, but I'll reply anyway.
Always good to have different views and info sir.
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Old 06-21-2012, 10:12 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by SmokeyWren View Post
Yeah, I know. I'm a day late and a dollar short...
Maybe, since I told them to order the rim in the 15x5 size for me yesterday. If I stay with that size rim, they mentioned an 8 ply Carlisle in my size (ST205/75R15) that will take 2150lbs at 65psi. Am I right in thinking that this would be the cheapest and safest way to go without changing rims?

Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokeyWren View Post
The space in the wheelwells of the trailer may not allow 16" tires. And you may not even have enough room to go from ST205 to ST225 tires.
This is part of the reason I decided on keeping the same size. There seems to be only ~2.5" above the current tires as it is, and ~1" between the tire and the inside of the outer fender (albeit a plastic one, so I could probably bend it out a bit...).

Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokeyWren View Post
I often see idiots towing RV trailers or horse trailers or race trailers at over 80 MPH. For those speeds, ST tires are not good.
Luckily, I'm one of those guys who prefers better gas mileage than saving a few minutes. I have been known to get up to 65mph(and once hit 70 before realizing), but prefer the MPG at 55mph. I plan my trips at the slower speed and let everyone else pass me by while I enjoy the trip.

Sounds like ST tires are safe enough, but with a higher load capacity than I have currently.
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Old 06-21-2012, 12:05 PM   #18
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A good 16" LT Truck tire will have 50% or more capacity than the St's, will last longer, and be way less prone to blow out.

Your tire dealer will be able to guide you in selection, but you'll need 16x6" rims that will bolt to your exdisting hubs, and most likely 215, or maybe 225 - 70- 16 tires.

A lot will depend on the clearance available in the wheelwell.
Though smaller both of the light trailers I had had tire blow-out issues, in both cases going one size larger on the rim (yes there was room, I checked that before getting the new, larger, rims) solved the problem.

In fact on the oldest trailer the last TWO blow outs were due to defective valve stems, No damage to the tire, the other one the tire died of old age. ... On the way to General RV.... To pick up six new, larger, tires (22.5") complete with a brand new Class A upon which they were already mounted.

(If you gonna have a flat, that's the time to flat it)
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Old 06-21-2012, 01:17 PM   #19
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I just replaced tires on my utility trailer, it was last licensed in 2008, the take offs were at least 15 years old and were LT tires too. So LT's have been around for quite a while.
The 1967 Ford F150 that I bought new had LT tires on it, so yes LT tires have been around for a while.
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Old 06-21-2012, 04:45 PM   #20
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Maybe, since I told them to order the rim in the 15x5 size for me yesterday. If I stay with that size rim, they mentioned an 8 ply Carlisle in my size (ST205/75R15) that will take 2150lbs at 65psi. Am I right in thinking that this would be the cheapest and safest way to go without changing rims?
Two important things to remember about Carlisle ST tires. 1. Carlisle requires their ST tires to be aired to full sidewall pressures...No exceptions. 2. Carlisle recommends 60 MPH for their ST tires.

That information can be confirmed by browsing their web site provided below.

http://www.carlisletire.com/



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Old 06-21-2012, 04:55 PM   #21
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Plus with the larger 16" rims/tires you will have a slower turning tire (less RPM's) and less wear and tear-even on the wheel bearings.
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Old 06-21-2012, 09:14 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrivinMyHome View Post
If I stay with that size rim, they mentioned an 8 ply Carlisle in my size (ST205/75R15) that will take 2150lbs at 65psi. Am I right in thinking that this would be the cheapest and safest way to go without changing rims?
Carlisle makes an ST205/75R15D in their Radial Trail trailer tires. And those are rated for 2,150 pounds, or about 18 percent more weight capacity than their load range C tire. That may be all you need.
Carlisle Tire & Wheel Company
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Old 06-21-2012, 09:41 PM   #23
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Do not buy the junk You just had blow they are for wheels not to go on a road in my mind JUNK get LT s may save Your life or others and no china bombs they have that name for a reason I have BFG commercial LT 10 ply ...good luck Bush
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Old 06-22-2012, 09:40 AM   #24
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2. Carlisle recommends 60 MPH for their ST tires.
Not just their brand of trailer tires, but any brand.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlisle website
High speed towing in hot conditions degrades Trailer Tires significantly. As heat builds up during driving, the tire’s internal structure starts to breakdown compromising the strength of the tire. It is recommended to not exceed 60 Miles per hour (MPH) while towing a trailer.


3 to 5 years is the average life expectancy of a Trailer Tire. After three years you should consider replacing your Trailer tires with new ones even if the tires have adequate tread depth left. After five years Trailer Tires are considered worn out and should be replaced.


· Keep your tires air pressure at the Maximum PSI recommended on the sidewall of the tire

As to inflation of trailer tires, the main thing is to be sure you have more than enough PSI to handle the load on the tires. The easiest way to do that is to inflate to the max PSI on the sidewall of the tire. Because trailers are almost always loaded to the gills when on the road, the Carlisle folks take the easy way out and say "· Keep your tires air pressure at the Maximum PSI recommended on the sidewall of the tire."

But for educated folks that have more than two brain cells to rub together, you can go by a load/inflation table for the exact spec of tire on your trailer. Just be sure your inflation PSI is more than the load on the tire requires. Maxxis publishes a load/inflation table for their trailer tires, and the info in that table was developed and published by the Tire and Rim Assn (TRA), so it applies to all brand of tires with the same specs.
http://www.maxxistires.com/Repositor.../m8008load.pdf

My trailer tires are load range E with 80 PSI on the sidewall, but I usually inflate them to 65 PSI, which is more than the 50 PSI of smaller the stock tires.
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Old 06-22-2012, 03:41 PM   #25
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You can lead a horse...etc...etc...

The document referenced below has a lot of important messages. The one most overlooked and abused is in big red letters at the bottom of page 2.

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&frm=1&source=web&cd=2&ved =0CFwQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nhtsa.gov%2FDOT%2F NHTSA%2FVehicle%2520Safety%2FArticles%2FAssociated %2520Files%2Fbrochure.pdf&ei=eVnhT8HtLoSo8QS5vaG2A w&usg=AFQjCNHsusKzWwa_yNBovsMt29l2PmOmzg


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Old 06-22-2012, 06:08 PM   #26
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Be aware that it is recommended changing tires every 6 years from DOT date on sidewall no matter the tread wear.
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Old 06-24-2012, 07:58 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokeyWren

Carlisle makes an ST205/75R15D in their Radial Trail trailer tires. And those are rated for 2,150 pounds, or about 18 percent more weight capacity than their load range C tire. That may be all you need.
Carlisle Tire & Wheel Company
Several years ago I experienced a side wall blowout on my original ST205/75R15C Carlisle trailer tires in Waco, Texas.

I pull my travel trailer coast to coast about 6,000 miles a year.

I pulled into the Discount Tire on I-10 in Waco to have 4 new tires mounted. I requested replacement tires which were C rated. $600 later, I am tooling down the road again.

I kept having people tell me my tires were going flat. I would check the air pressures which were correct for that tire.

So time goes on and I decide to replace my tires again before they fail.

So I go into a Discount Tire in Alpharetta, GA and get a quote: 4 - ST205/75R15C tires mounted and balanced. They wanted $675 to do the job.

I decided to shop around and found a company that would sell me the exact same tire except D rated, mounted and balanced for $425. They got the job! I get a higher rated same Carlisle tire at a lower cost.

When they mounted my new "higher rated" tires, they called me over to show me that the tires I had on my trailer were "B" rated.

I learned my lesson about "Discount" Tire.

I like the idea of upgrading to 16" wheels....
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Old 06-24-2012, 09:24 AM   #28
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Update

Thanks everyone for your input!

I decided to keep the 15" rims I have on the trailer and put the 205/75R15D Carlisles on them.

When getting ready for the trip last weekend, I made the decision that the tires were sunrot sufficiently enough to need to be replaced. I figured I would replace them when I got back. The tires currently on the trailer (for the next 2-3 days) are the original tires installed from 2006. They have held up well and, when I bought the trailer in March of last year, had no noticeable UV damage and had lots of tread left. The trailer was used in Michigan until it came to Arizona in November of 2010. They still have plenty of tread on them today but, because of the Arizona sun, they have sun cracks all over (sidewalls and tread).

I was surprised that, when the tire let go, I wasn't able to tell... AT ALL! We were driving West on I-8, up the mountains from El Centro towards San Diego (CA), so maybe the extra power required for the climb masked the extra required for the tire failure. Someone flashed me with their brights when they passed me but I ignored it, thinking they were just trying to let me know they were there. About 7-10 miles later, someone else did the same then signalled me to pull over (Thanks to the good samaritan who took the extra time to REALLY alert me!!). He said he saw us throwing sparks for about a mile before he pulled up beside me. By the time I stopped, the tire was virtually gone and the rim destroyed on the front axle. Luckily, the rear axle handled the weight (and obvious attack by flying bits of tire!) without shredding its tire. About 45 minutes later, we were back on the road with a mangled rim on the rear.

The rest of the trip went well. We got the chance to catch up with some friends we haven't seen in 8 years, and made it to the beach (haven't been there in a couple of years, either). Got the mismatched spare on Monday morning and made the trip back to AZ with no more tire problems.

We will be going back on a similar trip for the last week of July, and will get the chance to test the new tires pretty well on that trip. With the higher weight capacity, they should stand up well. And, this time(and this is NOT an advertisement) we have the certificates that Discount Tire offers. If anything happens to the tire (for the life of the tire, measured in tread depth), it will be replaced for a few dollars. I've had these before, and they are awesome if you need them. If not, it's just ~$16/tire for the insurance.

For better or worse (I hope better!), we'll be putting some ST shoes back on our trailers feet. Hopefully they won't need a resole for a few years to come.

And now you know the rest of the story!!!
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