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Old 02-04-2016, 09:17 AM   #1
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Tire pressure again,what about radials?

I see a lot about running 50 p.s.I.on tires.
50 seams WAY high for raidal tires.
Most new TT now have radials.
Haven't bought the TT we want yet, trying to
get as much info. as I can before pulling the trigger. We finally found what we want Lance 2295, have to pay off truck & put down together.
Trying to be as informed as possible.
Thanks.
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Old 02-04-2016, 09:33 AM   #2
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Typically, ST trailer tires are run at max PSI per sidewall. Carries the weight and they run cooler. I usually go a size or two larger and E rated tires on a new trailer. Have fun with it.
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Old 02-04-2016, 09:52 AM   #3
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Yep just follow what the max cold printed on the sidewall says and don't worry about it.

Our creekside came with goodyear radials and they want 55 psi.
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Old 02-04-2016, 09:54 AM   #4
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I have heard that some trailers come with 14 inch wheels, and that those aren't able to carry the weight of many travel trailers.

I have heard that some trailers are advertised at a dry weight, and this is before any options are added, and before batteries, propane, and any liquids are installed in it. Some owners are very surprised when they weight their rigs and find out what they really weigh, especially compared to what they are rated to carry.

My particular trailer suspension components are overbuilt for the the weight of the trailer, and this includes the tires. I don't need to, but I run the tires at their max pressure, because I am hoping that at the very least it gives me a cushion to spot a slow leak on my TPMS before a disaster. I don't need to, but I do.

TPMS is a great accessory for peace of mind and to try to head of a disaster.

Also know the speed rating for the tires, and never exceed it.

More information than you might ever want to know about RV tires can be found at RV Tire Safety
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Old 02-04-2016, 12:14 PM   #5
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The mismatched bias and radial ply tires that came on my boat trailer were both rated for 50psi max. And back to towed RVs, most people and the tire mfgrs. recommend running max psi on STs regardless of the RV's weight.
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Old 02-04-2016, 02:05 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scrapperjohn View Post
I see a lot about running 50 p.s.I.on tires.
50 seams WAY high for raidal tires.
Most new TT now have radials.
Haven't bought the TT we want yet, trying to
get as much info. as I can before pulling the trigger. We finally found what we want Lance 2295, have to pay off truck & put down together.
Trying to be as informed as possible.
Thanks.
Radial tires vary in AT pressure from 35 psi to even 130 psi so it yust depends on the loadrating of the tires.
So not yust the fact that they are radials means that 50 psi is to high.
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Old 02-04-2016, 05:38 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scrapperjohn View Post
I see a lot about running 50 p.s.I.on tires.
50 seams WAY high for raidal tires.
Most new TT now have radials.
Haven't bought the TT we want yet, trying to
get as much info. as I can before pulling the trigger. We finally found what we want Lance 2295, have to pay off truck & put down together.
Trying to be as informed as possible.
Thanks.
All new trailers have a federal certification label. It is permanently
affixed to the forward LH external portion of the trailer. It lists the tire & rim size and the manufacturer's recommended (correct) tire inflation pressures for the Original Equipment tires. It also has the trailer's GVWR and all GAWR values.
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Old 02-08-2016, 08:55 PM   #8
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Your TT manual should cover tire inflation plus the cold pressure is usually printed on the side of the tire.
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Old 02-09-2016, 08:30 AM   #9
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I use a math formula for my tires. Being all manufactures tend to have different specs of PSI vs. weight. So doing the formula will get you where you need to be even if you upgrade from lets say from Load Range D's to E's. Still can hit the mark.

http://i59.tinypic.com/2cqfx9w.jpg

I will say in the all the HUNDREDS of THOUSANDS of miles I've driven I've NEVER had even one tire explosive failure or blowout. Liker my current two trucks my 02 Dodge Ram 2500 is at 258k miles and 96 Dodge Ram 1500 is at 160k miles. I've only used my spare tire twice so far and both times where because of forest debris. One was a large stob on a log riped the side wall and the other was a sharp rock.

As for tire wear I can use a depth gauge and measure from outside to inside and never get much more than 1/32" variance. Means I've got the right pressures for the weight.

Even for ST tires I've never experienced a tire blow out yet either. Even with all the trailers I've own over the years. There is few things to remember ST tires typically have a speed rating below what most think. Also be aware of how much weight you load on your trailer. As you see in my pic link I scale my truck and trailer at least twice a year to verify weights and formula numbers. As for Trailers I don't use axle weight but the GVWR of the trailer since trailers are variable and do change weights.

Also take notice both the truck and trailer have Load Range E's. Neither truck or trailer is inflated to 80 PSI. Very damaging to do this. The trailer is only GVWR rated for 8,500 but if I was to inflate to MAX the tires would carry 11,920 pounds. That is 2 TONS over the mark. Same with the truck it only rated for 8,800 pound but if I inflated to MAX it would carry 12,168 pounds again 2 tons over the mark.
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Old 02-09-2016, 04:08 PM   #10
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Inflation pressures for trucks and trailers are apples and oranges. They are developed differently.

Look at the total GAWR for your truck. It will be much higher than the GVWR.

Do the same for your trailer. the total GAWR will be less than the trailer's GVWR.

Vehicle manufacturers have the sole responsibility for setting recommended cold inflation pressures for both vehicle's Original Equipment tires. After that it's up to the owner to become familiar with tire industry standards and apply them as they see fit, hopefully in a safe and recommended fashion.

Note: Without a certified modification a vehicle's GVWR will remain the same for the life of the vehicle.
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Old 02-09-2016, 06:08 PM   #11
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Do the same for your trailer. the total GAWR will be less than the trailer's GVWR.
Generally, yes, because part of the GVWR is hitch weight and not carried by the axles. However, there are campers out there with optional upgraded axles that don't necessarily get an upgrade in GVWR.

And then there's my trailer. It has a 5k GVWR, but two 2600 lb axles. Previous year GVWR was 5400. Listed dry weight is 3400 lbs, but empty it scales over 4000 lbs - without the battery or propane tanks. Tires are rated at 1480 lbs per - 2960 per axle, 5920 for the trailer. Wet and loaded its 5000 lbs, with the equalizer bars, it carrys a bit over 4k on the two axles. I put the heavy stuff at the front of the trailer because its tows best that way for me.
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Old 03-12-2016, 11:16 PM   #12
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Your manual tells you what the tire pressure should be. They design the TT with it in mind.
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Old 03-13-2016, 04:53 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mopar1973Man View Post
I use a math formula for my tires. Being all manufactures tend to have different specs of PSI vs. weight. So doing the formula will get you where you need to be even if you upgrade from lets say from Load Range D's to E's. Still can hit the mark.

http://i59.tinypic.com/2cqfx9w.jpg

I will say in the all the HUNDREDS of THOUSANDS of miles I've driven I've NEVER had even one tire explosive failure or blowout. Liker my current two trucks my 02 Dodge Ram 2500 is at 258k miles and 96 Dodge Ram 1500 is at 160k miles. I've only used my spare tire twice so far and both times where because of forest debris. One was a large stob on a log riped the side wall and the other was a sharp rock.

As for tire wear I can use a depth gauge and measure from outside to inside and never get much more than 1/32" variance. Means I've got the right pressures for the weight.

Even for ST tires I've never experienced a tire blow out yet either. Even with all the trailers I've own over the years. There is few things to remember ST tires typically have a speed rating below what most think. Also be aware of how much weight you load on your trailer. As you see in my pic link I scale my truck and trailer at least twice a year to verify weights and formula numbers. As for Trailers I don't use axle weight but the GVWR of the trailer since trailers are variable and do change weights.

Also take notice both the truck and trailer have Load Range E's. Neither truck or trailer is inflated to 80 PSI. Very damaging to do this. The trailer is only GVWR rated for 8,500 but if I was to inflate to MAX the tires would carry 11,920 pounds. That is 2 TONS over the mark. Same with the truck it only rated for 8,800 pound but if I inflated to MAX it would carry 12,168 pounds again 2 tons over the mark.
Added you to my contacts list and sended you a Friends request, but could not find a way to sent you a personal message in this forum.
Wanted to discuss about your tirepressure calculation and think I contacted you on Moparts man forum about it in the past.
You can contact me at my hotmail.com adress with same username as in this forum ( jadatis) about it if you want contact.

I dont totally agree with Fast Eagle , in basics pressure advice determination for Trailers and motorhomes is the same, but maximum load is for ST tires calculated for lower speed then motorhome tires.
ST tires because of that should be calculated in pressure for same deflection a motorhome tire would have , this will give still no bumping, but maximum savety margin and live time of tires.

Also motorhome tires the loads per tire can be added 10% reserve before calculating pressure , also for maximum reserve, and still acceptable gripp and comfort.
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Old 03-13-2016, 08:43 PM   #14
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Our new MPG2800qb says 65psi cold. We had one low tire this morning. I put 65 in it...��
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