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Old 11-05-2013, 09:24 PM   #1
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Tongue weight and Truck bed cargo

I have looked, but cannot seem to find an answer to my question about tongue weight.

I am looking at a 2014 Chevy 1500 Silverado, 4X4, 5.3L EcoTec3 V8 engine 355hp, 383 torque, 6 speed AT with tow/haul mode.
Standard Cab, 6.5 foot bed, Tow package, integrated tow brake systems.

Curb Weight 4,707 lbs
GWVR 6,800 lbs
Payload 2,068 lbs
Max Towing with 3.42 rear 9,100 lbs
GCWR 14,000
GAWR front 3,950 lbs
GAWR rear 3,850 lbs
Max Tongue Weight with WDH 1,200 lbs

I'm looking at a trailer with GVWR of 7000 max, so I figure 700 to 900 tongue weight max.

From all the reading I have been doing, seems Iím under all the max ratings.

I would like to get an ATV and put it in the bed of the truck. I know you have to add cargo and tongue weight to come under payload. 650 lbs for ATV (wet), 350 lbs for the Missus and me and 800 lbs for tongue weight. Which is under the 2068 payload.

650 lbs for the ATV in the bed plus the 800 lbs tongue weight would put me 250 lbs over the 1,200 max tongue weight if that is the case.

My question is do you have to add the cargo weight in the bed of the truck to the total tongue weight?
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Old 11-06-2013, 01:05 AM   #2
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Your tongue weight limit is set by the receivers rating. Has nothing to do with payload. Your max tongue weight is 1250lbs whether you have anything in the truck or not.
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Old 11-06-2013, 06:46 AM   #3
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Actually your tongue weight limit si set by the lower of the

GVWR
GAWR
and Hitch rating.


Your weight limit is set by the equation (assuming the hitch has a high enough rating):
GVWR - truck loaded curb weight = max loaded trailer hitch weight (or paylaod capacity).
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Old 11-06-2013, 10:57 AM   #4
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Usually travel trailers have a tongue weight that is about 15% of the gross weight (manufacturers don't account for propane, batteries or anything in the front storage compartments).

7000 lbs would realistically be around 1000lb tongue weight. Don't forget the weight of the hitch as well.

The other limit that can easily be exceeded is the truck's axle weight limits.
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Old 11-06-2013, 07:16 PM   #5
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Your doing the right thing coming here. I am learning so much from everyone. Anyhow I was looking to buy the same truck but went with the Ram because it has a higher towing capacity. However Silverado is coming out the end of this year with a new 6.2 liter engine that will allow to pull up to 12,000 pounds. Which is higher than all the other 1/2 ton trucks going. Just go with the higher gear ratio which greatly helps what your truck can handle. All in all best wishes!
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Old 11-06-2013, 08:21 PM   #6
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First off you need to weigh the truck loaded with all passengers,fuel and normal camping cargo plus the hitch. This is you actual curb weight, not the dry truck curb weight.

GVWR -loaded truck = max loaded trailer hitch weight.

GCWR - loaded truck = max loaded trailer weight.

Hitch weigh on a travel trailer will run between 10 and 15% of th trailers GVWR.

Ken
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Old 11-07-2013, 07:44 AM   #7
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Keep in mind that the ATV and cargo will be carried near the rear of the truck. The tongue weight will be even beyond the rear. With this setup you might be within the specs but still push down the rear too much. The WD bars will help with that but you might have to preload them more than you should. Anything that you can do to keep the weight forward in the truck will help.
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Old 11-07-2013, 09:45 AM   #8
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Thank you for all your responses. I understand that the ATV and the tongue weight cannot go over the payload weight of the truck and axel weight. From what I take from the responses, the tongue weight max does not include the truck bed cargo, it only matters in the GVWR, GAWR and GCWR.

What I did do is have my dealer take photos of the stickers of a truck on their lot with the exact same configuration as mine except for the 4x4 (Yes I know this changes some numbers). The door sticker with GVWR, GAWR front and rear and hitch stickerís tongue weight and GCWR numbers were all EXACTLY the same as the brochure and internet for a 2x4. I feel pretty confident that the numbers will be the same, but I will check my truckís stickers before paying for it.

I ordered a factory build so the truck will not be her until Dec. It has a 6800 GVWR and the curb weight of 4707 which the internet states a 2068 payload. (Of course I have to weigh the truck when I get it to see if the 4707 is correct.)

My game plan is to buy the truck, then look for trailers. Once again ensuring that the GVWR Sticker on the TT doesnít exceed 7000 lbs. After purchasing, I will weigh it if all looks good, drive it on a few trips to see how it drives. If everything is good, then I will get 700 lbs of some sort of weight, place it in the truck bed and drive the trailer again. If all is good, then I will purchase the ATV.

Thanks again.
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Old 11-07-2013, 03:14 PM   #9
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If I'm thinking right, the tongue weight is added to the truck and anything else in the truck to determine GVW, hence GVWR. In other words it would be like hooking up your trailer and pulling only the truck on to the scales.
GCW (GCWR) would be pulling both the truck and trailer on to the scales.
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Old 12-13-2013, 03:10 PM   #10
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I gonna put my 2 cents in here, although its probably only worth 1. When chevy comes out with its 6.2 new motor and more towing power in a 1500 truck it aint gonna let ya put more in the bed of the truck or give you more lbs to add to the tounge. Pulling a 12000 trailer with a tounge weight of 1300 lbs or so aint gonna make it on a 1500 truck. Maybe i'm wrong?
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Old 12-14-2013, 11:14 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moe-rich View Post
I gonna put my 2 cents in here, although its probably only worth 1. When chevy comes out with its 6.2 new motor and more towing power in a 1500 truck it aint gonna let ya put more in the bed of the truck or give you more lbs to add to the tounge. Pulling a 12000 trailer with a tounge weight of 1300 lbs or so aint gonna make it on a 1500 truck. Maybe i'm wrong?
Your exactly right. All the new 1/2 ton trucks are overrated for towing. It's all for marketing purposes. A good example is to go to the Ram towing guide. It uses a sliding bar that shows how much you can tow with what weight is in the truck. Start increasing the payload and the towed weight decreases. Most new TT/5th wheel buyers don't realize that adding 1000lbs to the truck decreases the available amount to tow by 1000lbs.

Let alone that having 12,000lbs behind a 1/2 ton on a windy day would not be anyone's drive in the park.

It's really funny how you never read about anyone complaining that they have too much truck and need to seriously think about downsizing.
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Old 12-14-2013, 12:19 PM   #12
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I guess its too late to recommend an 8' bed. ATV's and side x sides are getting larger. I've hauled both 1,000's of miles and I can't close my 1-tons tailgate with the RZR in the bed but no problem with an Outlander Max. Have fun.
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Old 01-26-2014, 10:56 PM   #13
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Thank you all for your responses and information. Here is an update on the trailer and truck.

We purchased an Outdoors RV Mfg. Creek Side 23RKS 27 feet. The GVW of the trailer is 7700. We loaded it with full water at 66 gallons and our things and the trailer came in at 7400. The problem is, the company designed the trailer with the fresh water tank in the front of the trailer. With full water we have to pull weight out of the front storage compartment to keep the tongue weight under 1200.

We have an Equalizer 1200/12000 WD hitch and the truckís hitch is rated at 1200/12000. We will travel with only 1/3 fresh water unless we boondock, then it will be weight management. So needless to say there will be no ATV.

We have 1,390 miles on the trailer now. The truck pulls it great. We pulled it up the Grapevine, I-5 going north in California. I believe itís a 5% to 6% grade. We made it at 60mph easy. Weíve pulled it up the Cajon pass on the I-15 and did great. It drives great up to 70mph and only get little nudges as class A motor homes and trucks pass us from behind.

Canít be happier with the truck and trailer.
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Old 01-26-2014, 11:04 PM   #14
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Congrats! Have fun...
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