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Old 06-12-2011, 12:36 AM   #1
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Towing with a Honda Pilot

I currently have a Fun Finder X-139, dry weight between 2000 and 2200 lbs., depending on which website you believe. I have a 2006 Honda Pilot, tow capacity with 3 occupants is 3500 lbs. The towing is comfortable. Of course, I'm towing, so I drive conservatively, but unless I'm climbing, it's easy towing.

My wife and I are thinking of buying a larger trailer, dry weight up to 2700 lbs. It's still below the 3500 threshold, and we don't have much gear. maybe 200 lbs. tops, including food and firewood. Would I notice a huge increase in difficulty in towing with possibly up to 500-700 lbs. extra? I'm already towing. Would an increase from 2000...2200 - 2700 pounds be that noticeable with 3500 lbs. towing capacity? Total weight would be under 3000. I hate to have a situation where I feel uncomfortable towing an overweight trailer. How would that extra weight be climbing? Much different than now, where I must shift into 3rd anyway?

And what about a sway bar? One dealer said I needed one. I don't use one with the X-139. Is it necessary, or is he trying to sell a sway bar?

Also, is towing an 18-foot trailer much different than towing a 14-foot trailer, in terms of driving, backing in, changing lanes, etc...? Does that extra 4 feet make a noticeable difference?

Or is this all a psychological change? All in my head, and I would get used to it in the first few miles?
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Old 06-12-2011, 07:59 AM   #2
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Pauli, Rule #1... The dealer is trying to sell you EVERYTHING he can !!!!

Seems as long as you're not over weight , the aerodynamics of the trailer makes all the difference....
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Old 06-12-2011, 09:07 AM   #3
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A 18 foot trailer will normally be more stable than a 14 foot trailer.
All things be equal.
And longer trailers back better because they don't change direction so quick.
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Old 06-12-2011, 09:37 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulitzlee2 View Post
I currently have a Fun Finder X-139, dry weight between 2000 and 2200 lbs., depending on which website you believe. I have a 2006 Honda Pilot, tow capacity with 3 occupants is 3500 lbs. The towing is comfortable. Of course, I'm towing, so I drive conservatively, but unless I'm climbing, it's easy towing.

My wife and I are thinking of buying a larger trailer, dry weight up to 2700 lbs. It's still below the 3500 threshold, and we don't have much gear. maybe 200 lbs. tops, including food and firewood. Would I notice a huge increase in difficulty in towing with possibly up to 500-700 lbs. extra? I'm already towing. Would an increase from 2000...2200 - 2700 pounds be that noticeable with 3500 lbs. towing capacity? Total weight would be under 3000. I hate to have a situation where I feel uncomfortable towing an overweight trailer. How would that extra weight be climbing? Much different than now, where I must shift into 3rd anyway?

And what about a sway bar? One dealer said I needed one. I don't use one with the X-139. Is it necessary, or is he trying to sell a sway bar?

Also, is towing an 18-foot trailer much different than towing a 14-foot trailer, in terms of driving, backing in, changing lanes, etc...? Does that extra 4 feet make a noticeable difference?

Or is this all a psychological change? All in my head, and I would get used to it in the first few miles?
I tow a 15 foot trailer with 2-2up ATV's with a total weight 2700 lbs loaded with my 06 Pilot. I do have the Honda factory towing package and my trailer has electric brakes. We usally tow it with the MH but have taken several 200 mile round trips to the Desert very comfortably and with no problems. If I towed long distances alot I would go with American muscle.
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Old 06-19-2011, 10:57 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulitzlee2 View Post
I currently have a Fun Finder X-139, dry weight between 2000 and 2200 lbs., depending on which website you believe. I have a 2006 Honda Pilot, tow capacity with 3 occupants is 3500 lbs. The towing is comfortable. Of course, I'm towing, so I drive conservatively, but unless I'm climbing, it's easy towing.

First, the dry weight is not a good number to hang your hat on. Use the GVWR only. Most people are at or over the GVWR when traveling.


My wife and I are thinking of buying a larger trailer, dry weight up to 2700 lbs. It's still below the 3500 threshold, and we don't have much gear. maybe 200 lbs. tops, including food and firewood. Would I notice a huge increase in difficulty in towing with possibly up to 500-700 lbs. extra? I'm already towing. Would an increase from 2000...2200 - 2700 pounds be that noticeable with 3500 lbs. towing capacity? Total weight would be under 3000. I hate to have a situation where I feel uncomfortable towing an overweight trailer. How would that extra weight be climbing? Much different than now, where I must shift into 3rd anyway?

And what about a sway bar? One dealer said I needed one. I don't use one with the X-139. Is it necessary, or is he trying to sell a sway bar?

I wouldn't tow any TT without a WD hitch and sway bar with less than a 3/4T TV and I would use them on 3/4T if over 18'.


Also, is towing an 18-foot trailer much different than towing a 14-foot trailer, in terms of driving, backing in, changing lanes, etc...? Does that extra 4 feet make a noticeable difference?

Or is this all a psychological change? All in my head, and I would get used to it in the first few miles?
I admit I don't anything about your Pilot but from what you discribe I would say you are over it's ability. Have you had to make sudden lane change (like avoiding a rock)? If so how did it handle? As the trailer gets bigger, it is more able to be the tail that wags the dog and that is no fun.
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Old 06-23-2011, 09:45 AM   #6
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Hi ... I had a 2010 Ridgeline ... Tow capacity 5000lbs ... Rented a rPod last year ... Dry weight 2500lbs ... It did the job ... But I didn't feel secure at all ... The fuel consumption was tripled !!!

We decided to change the truck to a F150 ... We bought a 6000lbs dry weight trailer and I feel more secure with the Ford ... And the fuel consumption is less then the Honda with a 2500lbs trailer ... With all the technology incorporated in the F150 ... trailer brake controller, sway control, rear camera, heavy duty suspension, transmission ratio ... It's day & night !!

If you go ahead with the 18 feet , and keep the pilot ... I would get a 'Equalizer' weight distribution system that include sway control !!

These systems are incredible !!

Hope this help your decision !
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Old 06-23-2011, 09:55 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Esamso View Post
Hi ... I had a 2010 Ridgeline ... Tow capacity 5000lbs ... Rented a rPod last year ... Dry weight 2500lbs ... It did the job ... But I didn't feel secure at all ... The fuel consumption was tripled !!!

We decided to change the truck to a F150 ... We bought a 6000lbs dry weight trailer and I feel more secure with the Ford ... And the fuel consumption is less then the Honda with a 2500lbs trailer ... With all the technology incorporated in the F150 ... trailer brake controller, sway control, rear camera, heavy duty suspension, transmission ratio ... It's day & night !!

If you go ahead with the 18 feet , and keep the pilot ... I would get a 'Equalizer' weight distribution system that include sway control !!

These systems are incredible !!

Hope this help your decision !
I'm not suggesting you should do it. but if you tried a F250 you would say why did I do that (get a F150). Been there done that.
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Old 06-23-2011, 10:24 AM   #8
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When you're scratching your head on this, be sure to factor in the weight of your hitching solution and the weight of the gear in your trailer. Even if you tow with empty tanks, you'll most likely have food, clothes and gear in the trailer. The weight adds up fast.

Also be sure to check on the tongue weight of your prospective trailer. I don't think you will see much stability difference in tracking and backing unless you are going to a trailer with two axles. Single axles trailers are harder to back.

Finally - you mentioned that the capacity of the Pilot with 3 passengers is 3500. Really? Usually the stated numbers are for the total cargo weight including the passengers. I think you're toying with trouble.
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Old 06-23-2011, 02:40 PM   #9
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Yes Of course The bigger The better !
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Old 08-10-2011, 12:58 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulitzlee2 View Post
It's still below the 3500 threshold, and we don't have much gear. maybe 200 lbs. tops, including food and firewood.
I was going to wait until later in my post to nag you about the firewood, but Iíll just take these things in order. I donít know where you live, but in many parts of the country (hardwood forests) you should not transport firewood, at least not firewood with the bark attached. This is because of numerous pests. In our area it is the Emerald Ash Borer.

Rangers in Indiana will ticket you and confiscate your wood if they catch you. Know what they do with it? Burn it. Go figure.


Quote:
Originally Posted by paulitzlee2 View Post
Would I notice a huge increase in difficulty in towing with possibly up to 500-700 lbs. extra? I'm already towing. Would an increase from 2000...2200 - 2700 pounds be that noticeable with 3500 lbs. towing capacity? Total weight would be under 3000. I hate to have a situation where I feel uncomfortable towing an overweight trailer. How would that extra weight be climbing? Much different than now, where I must shift into 3rd anyway?
You will undoubtedly notice a difference in towing the increased weight, especially when climbing. Itís a 23-35% increase in weight.

That is not to say that your Pilot will be overloaded. It obviously wonít be. Whether you feel uncomfortable or not is too subjective to really address. If it were me, I would do it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by paulitzlee2 View Post
And what about a sway bar? One dealer said I needed one. I don't use one with the X-139. Is it necessary, or is he trying to sell a sway bar?
Heís trying to sell a sway bar.

You should tow the new trailer with your preferred set-up and see if you need sway control. If the trailer is well designed, you probably wonít.
If you do, I agree with Esamso about the Equal-i-zer hitches. They are excellent and reasonably priced.
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by paulitzlee2 View Post
Also, is towing an 18-foot trailer much different than towing a 14-foot trailer, in terms of driving, backing in, changing lanes, etc...? Does that extra 4 feet make a noticeable difference?
Yes, itís a bit different, but not hugely so. The extra four feet is about a 30% increase. Youíll notice it, but adjust quickly.

As Mekanic stated, itís easier (up to a point) to back a longer trailer than a shorter one. It wonít be as maneuverable, but it will be easier to control.


Quote:
Originally Posted by paulitzlee2 View Post
Or is this all a psychological change? All in my head, and I would get used to it in the first few miles?
Yes.
 
Enjoy the new rig.
Ė Loren
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