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Old 05-01-2014, 02:15 PM   #15
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What ever you do . If you have C rating tires move to a E rating if possible
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Old 05-02-2014, 08:33 AM   #16
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Agreed. I had D rated, the ones on order are E rated (10 ply)
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Old 10-02-2014, 04:33 PM   #17
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Tires, tires, tires,

What a pain in the behind....and with everyone begging for a quality USA manufactured trailer tire....like the old Goodyear Marathons once were. It seems that blowouts and flats are just a part of towing. How sad. Wouldn't we all pay double or more for a quality tire that would last 25 or 30,000 miles? Talk about false economy!

Anyhow we tow a bunch. 32,000 miles in the last 30 months. Pulling a little 17ft. Kodiak Hybrid with a 2012 G. Cherokee...360 hp hemi, gas engine. The little hybrid only weighs 3,500 at gross wt. We love the camper and use it to death....but tires are a constant problem.

When we first bought it I ran about 5,000 miles on the new Carslies which both went flat shortly thereafter, with no real damage. Then I put new Maxxis tires on it. It is a single axle. Both tires blew out within 10,000 miles and the ripping tread did over $2,200.00 damage to the camper and wheel wells.

So I spent endless hours researching the supject and settled on the Kumho

I put the Kumho 857 Radial 205R 14-C tires on it. Beautiful looking tires with a much higher speed rating. Did a 4,000 mile trip and a 4,700 mile trip at highway speeds with no problems. O.K. Just finished a 6,538 mile trip. The passenger side Kumho went flat while sitting in a campsite the last day of our trip. No blowout. The inside sidewall seperated in an area the size of my palm and just went flat. The tires had about 15,000 total miles on them.

I am still disappointed but just ordered a new set of Kumho 857s as they seem to be the best thing out there in 14 inch wheels and bested the Maxxis by over 50%. My local dealer says that Kumho has ended production on the tire and he was not able to find them. So I bought from an internet dealer. Since we do thousands of dollar a year business with our local guy....he offered to mount them no charge. Nice part of living in rural Missouri.

So...for the future I am slowing to 65 mph(from 70+ average) and will throw away the tires after 15,000 or so miles. Guess it is just a cost of towing. Never imagined such.... having based my ignorance on car tires which often go 75,000 plus.

Still think that it sucks....but hey were are not about to stop camping and hiking all over this glorious nation.

Bob
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Old 10-03-2014, 10:05 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by bubbajean View Post
Tires, tires, tires,

What a pain in the behind....and with everyone begging for a quality USA manufactured trailer tire....like the old Goodyear Marathons once were. It seems that blowouts and flats are just a part of towing. How sad. Wouldn't we all pay double or more for a quality tire that would last 25 or 30,000 miles? Talk about false economy!

Anyhow we tow a bunch. 32,000 miles in the last 30 months. Pulling a little 17ft. Kodiak Hybrid with a 2012 G. Cherokee...360 hp hemi, gas engine. The little hybrid only weighs 3,500 at gross wt. We love the camper and use it to death....but tires are a constant problem.

When we first bought it I ran about 5,000 miles on the new Carslies which both went flat shortly thereafter, with no real damage. Then I put new Maxxis tires on it. It is a single axle. Both tires blew out within 10,000 miles and the ripping tread did over $2,200.00 damage to the camper and wheel wells.

So I spent endless hours researching the supject and settled on the Kumho

I put the Kumho 857 Radial 205R 14-C tires on it. Beautiful looking tires with a much higher speed rating. Did a 4,000 mile trip and a 4,700 mile trip at highway speeds with no problems. O.K. Just finished a 6,538 mile trip. The passenger side Kumho went flat while sitting in a campsite the last day of our trip. No blowout. The inside sidewall seperated in an area the size of my palm and just went flat. The tires had about 15,000 total miles on them.

I am still disappointed but just ordered a new set of Kumho 857s as they seem to be the best thing out there in 14 inch wheels and bested the Maxxis by over 50%. My local dealer says that Kumho has ended production on the tire and he was not able to find them. So I bought from an internet dealer. Since we do thousands of dollar a year business with our local guy....he offered to mount them no charge. Nice part of living in rural Missouri.

So...for the future I am slowing to 65 mph(from 70+ average) and will throw away the tires after 15,000 or so miles. Guess it is just a cost of towing. Never imagined such.... having based my ignorance on car tires which often go 75,000 plus.

Still think that it sucks....but hey were are not about to stop camping and hiking all over this glorious nation.

Bob

Yokohama makes a 185R14D light truck tire rated at 1850# at 65 psi. They are at the Tire Rack for about a hundred bucks each.

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Old 10-04-2014, 11:18 AM   #19
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Yokohama makes a 185R14D light truck tire rated at 1850# at 65 psi. They are at the Tire Rack for about a hundred bucks each.

FastEagle
Those are LT tires, not rated for trailer service.

But that same page says Kumho Radial 857 is also available in size 185R14. Look it up on the Kumho website and you'll see that the Kumho is a commercial truck tire rated for all position service, which includes trailer service. And they are also available in sizes 195R14 and 205R14.

My TT came with ST195/75R14C Goodyear Marathon, weight capacity 1710@50 PSI. I've had bad luck with Marathons in the past. So I intended to wait for the first blowout, then replace all 5 with something bigger/better/stronger. But with over 10,000 miles on those tires now, and not even one flat tire, I suspect Goodyear has improved the quality of the Marathon.

But I still want more weight capacity to give me more margin. The Kumho in size 195R14 has 1984 pounds weight capacity @65 PSI, or 16 percent increase in weight capacity. That adds a nice margin and they are exactly the same diameter as the stock tires, so no problem with them fitting on my trailer. The Kumho in size 205R14 has 2150 pounds weight capacity and less than an inch increase in diameter. So I'll bet it will fit inside the wheel wells with no problem. That would give me over 25% margin, so that's the one I'll measure carefully and buy those if I think they will fit in the wheel wells without rubbing.
Kumho Tire USA, Inc.

The only fly in the ointment might be the weight capacity of the stock wheels on my trailer. If the wheels are not rated for at least 2,150 pounds weight, then I'll have to buy new wheels, too. But that's no big deal. New wheels are available from Southwest Wheel for about $40 each, or $200 for all 5 wheels.
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Old 10-04-2014, 11:31 AM   #20
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Speaking in generalities most pull behind units have an axle(s), & tires rated to just barely carry the expected weight. That's the first premise. If you can find a PBU (pull behind unit) TT, 5ver, etc that has axles/tires rated to carry say 25% more than the expected weight I'd like to know the name and model. I don't believe you will find one.

Here's the problem. The greater the weight of the unit the bigger the axle capacity and tire weight capacity. BUT and this is a REALLY BIG but you will still not find the extra weight capacities enough to give you very much of a safety margin. Do your own research.

I looked but can't find a simple tire rating chart to show the differences. In simple terms it's this.

If your PBU has 14" tires there is a maximum rated tire that will be available. The manufacturers will only make a tired rated so big for that rim size. If you want greater weight capacity you have to have a bigger rim. Lets say it's 2,100 lbs at 65 lbs of pressure . If your TT is rated to carry 8,000 lbs maximum your 4 tires will safely carry 8,400 lbs at 65 PSI. Your margin of safety is 400 lbs. You can't find a tire rated to carry more weight than 2,100 or 8,400 for four tires. That's what the TT industry has done for you.

Maybe you'd like 4 tires rated for 3,000 lbs each for a max of 12,000 lbs. Wow that would be nice. But you can't do it. Either they won't make them or they won't fit.

If you wanted a greater margin of safety, or just a larger capacity tire so you felt better about the weight you would have to go to a 15" or 16" rim and tire. Well guess what??? Most TT manufacturers will tell you that the bigger axles won't fit. Or you can't put 15" tires on your unit for what ever reason. They will also tell you if you want bigger rims go to a bigger TT. But that's not the problem. The problem is the safety margin.

I have read of many who have spent upwards of $8,000 to $10,000 to have it done or to do it themselves.

The bottom line is simply this. The TT industry is building these units on the edge of destruction. You can not very easily get tires large enough so the existing tires will give you very many safe miles. The lager the unit the larger the axles and tires but there is still not much room for safety.

Here's another way of looking at it. If you weigh 200 lbs and are going to take a 2,000 mile hike you would not try it in loafers. However you would find yourself the best hiking boots you could find. Well you just can't do that with your PBU. The industry just does not give you that option. Either use the loafers they put on the TT or upgrade to a decent sneaker but you just can not buy those high quality hiking boots that will last through your 2,000 mile hike.

TeJay
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Old 10-04-2014, 02:33 PM   #21
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I went from 205 C rated to 225 E rated tires on the last trailer. Didn't need to change rims.
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Old 10-04-2014, 02:42 PM   #22
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If you can find a PBU (pull behind unit) TT, 5ver, etc that has axles/tires rated to carry say 25% more than the expected weight I'd like to know the name and model. I don't believe you will find one.
The axles are pretty well standardized in the RV industry. So the "expected weight" of the trailer should never be more than the combined GAWR of the trailer axles.

So it's tire weight capacity that is the variable. I couldn't find 15" trailer tires with more weight capacity without going to bigger size tire, for my 5er that came with ST205/75R15C tires. And the stock tires had barely enough weight capacity to haul the 5er when the 5er was loaded to the combined GAWR.

But for my TT, the stock-size ST205/75R14C tires have 1,760 pounds weight capacity, and the GAWR is 2,800 per axle, or 1,400 per tire. 1760 minus 1400 = 360, divided by 1400 = 25.7% "safety margin", or excess weight capacity.. My goal is 25%, so those stock tires meet my druthers. And they now have about 10,000 miles on the trailer tires without even one flat, so the tires must be adequately sized for the max load on that trailer.

2012 SkyLine Nomad Joey 196S
Product Page | Skyline Recreational Vehicles

And if I want even more margin, Kumho makes that tire in size 205R14 with 2150 weight capacity per tire. That's over 50% safety margin, which should be enough for anyone.
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Old 10-04-2014, 03:11 PM   #23
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My TT came with ST195/75R14C ...
Oops! Wrong trailer. My TT came with ST205/75R14c. Weight capacity 1,760 per tire @ 50PSI. But that doesn't change the point of my quoted post.
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Old 10-04-2014, 03:25 PM   #24
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I went from 205 C rated to 225 E rated tires on the last trailer. Didn't need to change rims.
Did you check the width of the rims? When I went to 225s, the stock rims were not wide enough for the bigger tires. 225s require 6" wide rims, and my stock trailer rims were only 5.5" wide.
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Old 10-04-2014, 10:35 PM   #25
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Did you check the width of the rims? When I went to 225s, the stock rims were not wide enough for the bigger tires. 225s require 6" wide rims, and my stock trailer rims were only 5.5" wide.
Yes, it came OE with 6" alloy wheels.
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Old 10-06-2014, 08:24 PM   #26
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Tires

Gents,

The Kumho 857 R205 14-C which I put on our little trailer is rated 2150 lbs at 65 psi. and a speed rating of 109 mph. That gives me an extra margin of 800 lbs. on my single axle trailer with a gross wt. of 3,500 lbs and plenty of speed protection. That is the highest rated tire I can find in the 14 inch size. They are an inch taller that the factory tires or the Maxxis I once had. But there is plenty of room in the wheel well.

I bought new rims rated to carry 60 psi, the highest I could find in a 14in. rim. My tire dealer claims the 65 psi in the tire will not harm the rims. Unfortunately it seems that Kumho has discontinued the tire.

I was able to get a new set from Tirerack which arrived today. $125.00 each. They will be mounted tomorrow. Am hoping to get at least the 15,000 miles that I got from the last set.

Happy travels.

Bob
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Old 10-06-2014, 08:41 PM   #27
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Out of curiosity have you checked the weight on each wheel with a scale or had the alignment checked? Any strange wear patterns on the tires?
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Old 10-06-2014, 09:03 PM   #28
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I have a question that has probably been answered,, so please forgive me for asking again.... Why would you not want to use a LT tire on a TT instead of all these trailer tires that seem to have problems ???? I love our Cooper (made in the USA) tires we have on our class A... 16" .. Why not go to a heavier rated tire ??? No, not the size,, but the rating,, as in ST verses LT... etc... ????
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