Go Back   iRV2 Forums > TRAVEL TRAILER, 5th WHEEL & TRUCK CAMPER FORUMS > Travel Trailer Discussion
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-30-2005, 09:42 AM   #1
Community Administrator
 
NLOVNIT's Avatar


 
Pond Piggies Club
Fleetwood Owners Club
Ford Super Duty Owner
LA Gulf Coast Campers
Outdoors RV Owners Club
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 22,267
Blog Entries: 1
Can the extremely dry ground make my camper frame more electrified? That's what I was told by an electrician this past weekend. Here's the story...
We pulled into a CG & hooked up as usual. I noticed the caution light lit on our surge supressor panel. Dave opened the bay & checked the other lights on the actual supressor & nothing was amiss. A while later, I went to open the twist locks on one of our bay doors & got a buzz through my fingers. Nothing really bad, but enough to make it uncomfortable. Hadn't noticed this when we were hooking up when I was constantly in & out of different bay doors. I realized that what was different this time was I was barefoot - before I had shoes on & those twist locks come in contact with the frame. We couldn't locate our circuit tester, so I went to the CG office to report the issue. They stated other units had reported the same & that they were checking into it. An electrician came out, tested the box we were hooked into, & tested our camper circuit. All was fine - no shorts showing up. He said that because the ground was extrememly dry, it was conducting electricity more than normal. He also told me there is some current that runs through the frame since the 12v is grounded to the frame (didn't say anthing about 120v, though) & that it's more noticeable since we've had so little rain & the ground is so dry, plus that the ground rod with the electric might not be long enough (must be 8') to conduct any current down deep enough. He didn't seem to think it was anything to be concerned about - just told me to be sure I had shoes on when I came in contact with anything touching the frame. All electronic equipment was ok - no damage.

Was this guy giving me a valid explaination? Is this something that can happen?
Signed-Shocked in OH
L-
__________________

__________________
Lori & Dave - FMA #3415 | FMCA #F419886 | RV/MH Hall of Fame Lifetime Member
2006 Fleetwood Bounder 36Z & 2014 Honda CRV EX-L AWD, My iRV2 Photo Albums
How is it one careless match can start a forest fire but it takes a whole box to start a campfire?
NLOVNIT is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 08-30-2005, 09:42 AM   #2
Community Administrator
 
NLOVNIT's Avatar


 
Pond Piggies Club
Fleetwood Owners Club
Ford Super Duty Owner
LA Gulf Coast Campers
Outdoors RV Owners Club
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 22,267
Blog Entries: 1
Can the extremely dry ground make my camper frame more electrified? That's what I was told by an electrician this past weekend. Here's the story...
We pulled into a CG & hooked up as usual. I noticed the caution light lit on our surge supressor panel. Dave opened the bay & checked the other lights on the actual supressor & nothing was amiss. A while later, I went to open the twist locks on one of our bay doors & got a buzz through my fingers. Nothing really bad, but enough to make it uncomfortable. Hadn't noticed this when we were hooking up when I was constantly in & out of different bay doors. I realized that what was different this time was I was barefoot - before I had shoes on & those twist locks come in contact with the frame. We couldn't locate our circuit tester, so I went to the CG office to report the issue. They stated other units had reported the same & that they were checking into it. An electrician came out, tested the box we were hooked into, & tested our camper circuit. All was fine - no shorts showing up. He said that because the ground was extrememly dry, it was conducting electricity more than normal. He also told me there is some current that runs through the frame since the 12v is grounded to the frame (didn't say anthing about 120v, though) & that it's more noticeable since we've had so little rain & the ground is so dry, plus that the ground rod with the electric might not be long enough (must be 8') to conduct any current down deep enough. He didn't seem to think it was anything to be concerned about - just told me to be sure I had shoes on when I came in contact with anything touching the frame. All electronic equipment was ok - no damage.

Was this guy giving me a valid explaination? Is this something that can happen?
Signed-Shocked in OH
L-
__________________

__________________
Lori & Dave - FMA #3415 | FMCA #F419886 | RV/MH Hall of Fame Lifetime Member
2006 Fleetwood Bounder 36Z & 2014 Honda CRV EX-L AWD, My iRV2 Photo Albums
How is it one careless match can start a forest fire but it takes a whole box to start a campfire?
NLOVNIT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2005, 09:47 AM   #3
Member
 
BigPackFan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Endicott, NY USA
Posts: 47
Doesn't water conduct electricity better than the Earth? (Get out of the lake during a thunderstorm.) That being the case, wet dirt would conduct electricity better than dry dirt, not the other way around.

At least that makes sense to me
__________________
BPF

1998 TowLite 18TD
BigPackFan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2005, 10:04 AM   #4
Moderator Emeritus
 
RustyJC's Avatar


 
Texas Boomers Club
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Cypress, Texas USA
Posts: 8,854
For optimum grounding, the earth around the ground rod that should have been located at the shore power breaker box should be moist. Dry earth can create high resistance between the grounding rod and the earth. This can create some voltage potential (aka a "ground loop") between the RV frame and the ground where you were standing. If your feet are a lower resistance path to earth than the grounding circuit, then you can get shocked!

Rusty
__________________
2016 Ram Longhorn 3500 Dually 4x4 CCLB, 385/900 Cummins, Aisin AS69RC, 4.10
2014.5 DRV Mobile Suites 38RSSA #6972
Come join us on a TEXAS BOOMERS rally!
RustyJC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2005, 10:07 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
ruppr's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Texas Boomers Club
Workhorse Chassis Owner
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Boerne, TX. USA
Posts: 701
No, he was 100 % wrong, and I can't beleive he said "just to have shoes on"!!!!!!!

Wonder where he got hislearner's permit???

Best,
__________________
Ruppr|Kris|2005 Itasca SunCruiser|Ultrapower
(toad) 2007 Ford Focus|Aventa LX|Brakebuddy
WIT|FMCA
ruppr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2005, 10:13 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Two Bit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Texas hillcountry USA
Posts: 530
The electrician was on the right track but he was backwards in what he said. The ground rods are not able to ground as well in dry ground. Dry dirt is not a good conductor. They either need to be deeper(longer)or the earth around them needs to be watered so it soaks down deep. What happened when you got the tingle was that you were a better ground than the ground rod. They need to fix the problem before someone gets a fatal shock (the risk is not severe but possible) or it messes up someone's pacemaker since it seems to be happening at more than one sight. Your 12 volt DC was not the cause. It was the park AC. No good electrician would dismiss a poorly grounded system as just a comfort issue. It needs shut off till fixed (and they need another electrician).
__________________
Robert & Nancy with "Murphy the EOG"
Murphy has passed on, but Micah and Bogie have assumed the watch! 02 Holiday Rambler 5ver, 2015 Indian Chief Vintage. 98 Coachmen truck camper.
Two Bit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2005, 12:00 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
DavidMc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: On-The-Road
Posts: 134
To my ears also, it sounds like that campground needs to spend some more money -
a. on an equipment renovation/replacement/repair process, and
b. on a better electrician.

However, some of the RVs themselves may be contributing to the problem.
RVs are supposed to be "appliances" -- the neutral and the (safety) ground are not to be interconnected inside the RV when it is receiving 120-volt AC from outside (ie the campground service). I have seen instances where someone has wired the RV internal circuit breaker panel like a house (where the neutral and ground are bonded - inter-connected).
If an RV has the neutral connected to the ground internally -- some of the potential current will attempt to flow back to the service entrance via the ground wire (current that normally flows back only via the neutral wire). The ground wire is probably connected to the frame of the RV and your body can supply a yet shorter path to the ground.

Regarding inverters and generators -- most of these should be forcing the inter-connect of the neutral and ground only when they are supplying the power.

You might want to check your RV to be certain it is acting like an 'appliance' when plugged in to outside power.
__________________
David

My signature used to include a link to my personal web-site - - - however:
DavidMc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2005, 12:20 PM   #8
Community Administrator
 
NLOVNIT's Avatar


 
Pond Piggies Club
Fleetwood Owners Club
Ford Super Duty Owner
LA Gulf Coast Campers
Outdoors RV Owners Club
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 22,267
Blog Entries: 1
Thank you, for your quick responses. I've e-mailed the campground the information & asked them to remedy the situation before someone gets seriously hurt. I will keep you posted if/when I hear back from them.
L-
P.S. to DavidMc: I will have my husband check the camper circuit breaker. Thanks!
__________________

__________________
Lori & Dave - FMA #3415 | FMCA #F419886 | RV/MH Hall of Fame Lifetime Member
2006 Fleetwood Bounder 36Z & 2014 Honda CRV EX-L AWD, My iRV2 Photo Albums
How is it one careless match can start a forest fire but it takes a whole box to start a campfire?
NLOVNIT is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
"Pulling the Pin" DonnaB Toads and Motorhome Related Towing 4 12-01-2008 06:54 PM
Rating of Safety chain? roger2 5th Wheel Discussion 5 07-15-2008 07:28 PM
Pulling a 6% or 8% grade. skipsor Workhorse and Chevrolet Chassis Motorhome Forum 3 03-31-2006 05:35 PM
New Pulling Question 020202 Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion 5 11-03-2005 07:19 PM
Pulling my hair out minnow69 Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion 9 06-21-2005 08:02 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.