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Old 05-17-2012, 02:27 AM   #1
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Question Which equalizer hitch?

Hi all new to the forum so I hope this is the right place for this question. I have a new to me 26ft travel trailer. Weighed it today and with just the tires on the scale and it was 4200lbs and with just the tongue on the scale it was 450lbs. This was empty minus 1 full propane tank. The trailer is rated up to around 6200 lbs totally loaded I believe. I have read that many people are fond of the Equalizer setup and that it works really well at eliminating sway. I am curious which weight equalizer would be correct for my weights and potential weights. The tongue alone will be 500-600 lbs with just the addition of additional propane and the equalizer itself.

I would also like opinons on the equalizer in general.

Here is the link to the hitches I am looking at.
Equal-i-zer Travel Trailer Hitches - RVWholesalers.com RV Parts

Thanks.
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Old 05-17-2012, 07:48 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OregonTRX4 View Post
The trailer is rated up to around 6200 lbs totally loaded I believe... I am curious which weight equalizer would be correct for my weights and potential weights.
Then you want a hitch that can handle a minimum of 15 percent hitch weight of a 6,200 pound max trailer weight. Or 930 pounds max hitch weight.

Equal-I-Zer makes hitches that will handle 400, 600, 1000, 1200, or 1400 pounds of hitch weight. You need the one that can handle 1000.

Quote:
I have read that many people are fond of the Equalizer setup and that it works really well at eliminating sway.
Sales hype. Equal-I-Zer is as good as any of the other cheap WD hitches that cost less than $1000. But they do not eliminate sway. They reduce the sway, and if you are never in a severe condition that can cause severe and deadly sway then it will probably be okay. Lots of folks are satisfied with their Reese or Curt or Valley or Drawtite or Equal-I-Zer WD hitch, because they have never been in a condition where they needed a better hitch.

If you want a hitch that will eliminate sway, then you must spend a lot more money. Over $2,000. You want a ProPride, or a Hensley Arrow, or a PullRite. They eliminate sway. But they cost a lot more than an Equal-I-Zer.
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Old 05-17-2012, 02:35 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by SmokeyWren View Post
Then you want a hitch that can handle a minimum of 15 percent hitch weight of a 6,200 pound max trailer weight. Or 930 pounds max hitch weight.

Equal-I-Zer makes hitches that will handle 400, 600, 1000, 1200, or 1400 pounds of hitch weight. You need the one that can handle 1000.



Sales hype. Equal-I-Zer is as good as any of the other cheap WD hitches that cost less than $1000. But they do not eliminate sway. They reduce the sway, and if you are never in a severe condition that can cause severe and deadly sway then it will probably be okay. Lots of folks are satisfied with their Reese or Curt or Valley or Drawtite or Equal-I-Zer WD hitch, because they have never been in a condition where they needed a better hitch.

If you want a hitch that will eliminate sway, then you must spend a lot more money. Over $2,000. You want a ProPride, or a Hensley Arrow, or a PullRite. They eliminate sway. But they cost a lot more than an Equal-I-Zer.
Thanks for your reply. I guess eliminate was a poor choice of words.
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Old 05-17-2012, 06:46 PM   #4
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I've used the Equalizer hitch for about 10 years now. As a matter of fact, the unit is on its' third trailer. I like the unit because of ease of use. No chain links to count. I've been in 30 MPH cross winds, and didn't feel unsafe at any time.

Yes, there are very expensive hithes that would do a better job, however, for weekend and two week vacation trips, the Equalizer, set up correctly, should be OK.

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Old 05-17-2012, 07:23 PM   #5
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I agree with above, but do not forget to get an anti sway bar. i have a Valley WD and Valley anti sway bar. Works great.
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Old 05-17-2012, 07:56 PM   #6
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I would place the Reese Dual Cam Straightline well above the conventional hitches for controlling sway. It is a well proven design. It takes a bit more time to set up, but us well worth the effort.

Reese Strait-Line Dual Cam Weight Distribution Hitch 1000# - $475..

Ken
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Old 05-17-2012, 09:14 PM   #7
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I would place the Reese Dual Cam Straightline well above the conventional hitches for controlling sway. It is a well proven design. It takes a bit more time to set up, but us well worth the effort.

Reese Strait-Line Dual Cam Weight Distribution Hitch 1000# - $475..

Ken
Reese makes a great unit, and their customer service is good, too. I used a Reese unit for a long time. As a matter of fact, I can remember my Dad using it on his 1964 International Travelall, and a 1960 Holiday Rambler Trailer.

We switched to the Equalizer because of its ease of use, and I think it does a better job.

Just remember if you use the Reese unit, disconnect the anti sway unit before you back up! Opps, I've had that happen.

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Old 05-18-2012, 07:35 AM   #8
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I can only comment on what I have. I am using a equil-i-zer. Simple setup no sway at all. My TT is 590/7200 maxed. I pulls with ease. Cross winds tracktor trailers blowing by no problem. I am sure most of the products are good but I can tell you the equal-I-zer works. It is noisy as hell though, but that is it working.
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Old 05-18-2012, 10:05 AM   #9
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The Blue-Ox Sway Pro is a simple, clean, and effective hitch. Very happy with mine.
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Old 05-18-2012, 11:15 AM   #10
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I may give the Reese a chance. I was wondering. Sometimes I will have a quad in the bed of my truck and sometimes I wont. Would that count as tounge weight and I would want it at the stock ride height prior to quad and trailer or would I only want it adjusted for the trailer and not the quad?

Thanks for the help guys. This whole hitch topic can be difficult to grasp for a newb.
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Old 05-18-2012, 12:01 PM   #11
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The quad does not count a tonge weight but it is part of the load the truck can carry. So of you know the weight of your loaded truck and know how much room you have for carrying capacity, the weight of the quad, plus the tongue weight goes against your cargo capacity.

Ken
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Old 05-18-2012, 06:35 PM   #12
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Sometimes I will have a quad in the bed of my truck and sometimes I wont. Would that count as tounge weight ...
It counts as part of the wet and loaded weight of the tow vehicle. So it reduces the unused payload capacity available for hitch weight (or tongue weight).

It's simple. Load the tow vehicle with everything and everyone that will be in it when towing. Including the quad. Go to a truckstop with a CAT scale and fill up with fuel. Then weigh the wet and loaded vehicle. Subtract that weight from the GVWR of the vehicle and the result is the max hitch weight you can have without being overloaded.

Divide that max hitch weight by 0.12 and the result is an estimate of the max weight of any tag trailer you can tow without being overloaded.

Quote:
...and I would want it at the stock ride height prior to quad and trailer or would I only want it adjusted for the trailer and not the quad?
The weight-distributing hitch distributes hitch weight, regardless of what you are hauling in the bed. It distributes some of the hitch weight to the front axle of the tow vehicle, and some back to the trailer axles, and leaves about half of the original hitch weight on the ball of the hitch.

Because it moves weight off the ball of the hitch, then the rear suspension will come up some as the weight-disbributing bars are tightened and weight on the rear axle is reduced. But don't try to use the weight-distributing hitch as a device to level an overloaded truck.

Ideally, the front suspension and the rear suspension of the truck would both compress about the same when the weight-distributing hitch is properly adjusted. So both the front and rear ride height of the truck will be lower when the trailer is properly connected.

The tongue weight on my nearly-empty TT was 650 pounds. My weight-distributing hitch distributed that weight as follows:
240 to front axle = ~37%
140 to trailer axles = ~21%
290 left on the ball = ~45%
----
650 total hitch weight
===

So as those numbers show, you probably won't get the hitch adjusted so the same amount of hitch weight is on the rear axle as on the front axle. So in that example, the rear suspension of the truck with 290 pounds extra weight will compress a bit more than the front suspension of the truck which has 240 pounds extra weight.
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