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Old 10-14-2016, 09:26 PM   #15
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My TT came with "Akuret" Chinese tires. When I replaced them, just in time, the same size and load range Maxxis must have come close to weighing twice as much. That told me a lot about why the run of the mill cheapie tires don't hold up.
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Old 10-14-2016, 09:30 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post
Maybe the best answer is- "all of the above"?
Are there any STs made in the USA?
Do they have any history of failures?
Inquiring minds want to know.
Non are made in the USA now.
However I've towed GN/pintle hitch/bumper 7k gvwr up to 22k gvwr trailers of all types (non rv) for a living full and part time starting in the late '60s up until around '90
Back then all ST tires were made in the USA...and we had the same problems with them then as we do now. They were good for about 12-15k miles at the most in that type of work.

Goodyear stopped prorating their Marathons under warranty for me because I was ruining to many. They left me holding the bag so to speak.
This was back when the speed limit was 55 mph. Having a dot number I didn't speed. The company I contracted with had a policy of two speeding tickets within a year and your gone.

IMO the orig ST tire wasn't a good design . They had that basket ball shape sidewall with a narrow tread. This left the sidewall bulge way out past the tires tread like a half flat tire. This leaves the tires sidewall more suspect to cuts and bruising from pot holes or obstacles in the road and just rolling up and over a curb.
Carlisle and Goodyear are our oldest ST tire makers. They said the rounded profile gave the trailer a smoother ride which may be true but at what cost to long term reliability.

The new gen load C and D and E ST tires like Carlisle HD or the Provider and a couple of others have lost that rounded profile. They have a flatter sidewall profile more like a big rig trailer tire and come with a higher speed rating.

ST tires like the 16" G load range Sailun S637 or Gladiator QR35-tr are a commercial grade all steel ply carcass tire and other than being black and round have no kinship to the smaller ST tires.

Back in the day (decades before china made our P and LT and ST tires) ST tires were called ST bombs. Today their called china bombs which IMO isn't fair to the many very good high quality P and LT tires we use that are made in china.


There are many reasons ST tires "lets go". Many have been mentioned.
Todays new gen ST tires are hands down much better tires than those old ST tires from years past which looked closer like a wheel barrow tire.....JMO
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Old 10-14-2016, 09:44 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by JIMNLIN View Post
Non are made in the USA now.
However I've towed GN/pintle hitch/bumper 7k gvwr up to 22k gvwr trailers of all types (non rv) for a living full and part time starting in the late '60s up until around '90
Back then all ST tires were made in the USA...and we had the same problems with them then as we do now. They were good for about 12-15k miles at the most in that type of work.

Goodyear stopped prorating their Marathons under warranty for me because I was ruining to many. They left me holding the bag so to speak.
This was back when the speed limit was 55 mph. Having a dot number I didn't speed. The company I contracted with had a policy of two speeding tickets within a year and your gone.

IMO the orig ST tire wasn't a good design . They had that basket ball shape sidewall with a narrow tread. This left the sidewall bulge way out past the tires tread like a half flat tire. This leaves the tires sidewall more suspect to cuts and bruising from pot holes or obstacles in the road and just rolling up and over a curb.
Carlisle and Goodyear are our oldest ST tire makers. They said the rounded profile gave the trailer a smoother ride which may be true but at what cost to long term reliability.

The new gen load C and D and E ST tires like Carlisle HD or the Provider and a couple of others have lost that rounded profile. They have a flatter sidewall profile more like a big rig trailer tire and come with a higher speed rating.

ST tires like the 16" G load range Sailun S637 or Gladiator QR35-tr are a commercial grade all steel ply carcass tire and other than being black and round have no kinship to the smaller ST tires.

Back in the day (decades before china made our P and LT and ST tires) ST tires were called ST bombs. Today their called china bombs which IMO isn't fair to the many very good high quality P and LT tires we use that are made in china.


There are many reasons ST tires "lets go". Many have been mentioned.
Todays new gen ST tires are hands down much better tires than those old ST tires from years past which looked closer like a wheel barrow tire.....JMO
I went with the 17.5 H rated Sailun S637 not knowing much about them. My 5th wheel maxes at 16500lbs with tandem 7k axles. Wish me luck!
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Old 10-14-2016, 09:57 PM   #18
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MoNothing which was said is applicable to me:
1. I always check the pressure before going and inflate to 50 psi if necessary.
2. I never go above 65
3. The trailer is not overloaded
4. I have TPMS
Nevertheless, 34 months after purchase one of the original TowMax tires simply gave up during slow speed maneuver on the parking lot, developed about 4 inch tear on the sidewall and started rapidly lose air.
We put a spare on its place with ZERO miles on it. On the next day my TPMS started beeping, I stopped and found this brand new spare completely free from thread!
I believe, the only answer is substandard rubber which does not withstand UV, the elements even if not used, hangs on bumper covered by a tire case.
I will try Maxxis next time
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Old 10-14-2016, 10:01 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by parkerbill View Post
If you have a TPMS that also monitors temps I wouldn't think you would need to manually check tire temps at rest stops would you?
I would. Things often get warm before they go critical. I mostly look for differences from side to side on each axle and between side by side duals. I check tires and hubs where applicable.
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Old 10-15-2016, 08:47 AM   #20
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We've had great experience with Maxxis as well.
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Old 10-15-2016, 10:03 AM   #21
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Hmmm. Another story like my satisfaction with Marathon tires. While there are certainly issues with tires, I kinda wonder about the ratio of problem-to-no-problem for various brands. I suggest the preponderance of negative comments are because people, including myself, tend to do this far more than people who are satisfied with something. In a perfect world, we would have real data for the percentage of failures for each brand. Of course, this is just dreaming, but does anyone want to start a poll?. I have seen these on IRV2, but don't know how to do this. Maybe something like this and make it a sticky that could be updated as people respond:

1. Tire brand
2. Motorhome use
3. Trailer use
4. No problem
5. Have had failures, blowouts, tread separation, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gigattime View Post
We've had great experience with Maxxis as well.
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Old 10-15-2016, 12:18 PM   #22
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If you have a brand that has sold 100,000 tires in the US, and 10% fail with no clear reason, and each and every owner of those failed tires tells their story on the internet, there will be 10,000 stories to read about the crap tires they have/had.

Sell 1,000,000 tires and 10% fail, you'll have 100,000 stories about how the tires are crap.

Sell 40,000 tires, and 10% fail, there will be 4,000 stories about how they are crap.

There would always be far less stories about how the tires have been great and reliable. People rarely get on the internet to rail about how great a product is.

So, which tires are crap? Well, if my little hypothetical was reflected in real life, they would all be. Good luck, folks.
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Old 10-16-2016, 08:07 AM   #23
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Fishalaska1,
Have had 17.5 Sailuns on my Suites for 2 travel seasons--this last season included a trip to Alaska. They are holding up very well at over 24k miles, and rarely need air. I do use a TPMS. I have more weight on my tires than you do.
I think you just made your own good luck.
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Old 10-16-2016, 09:26 AM   #24
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Fishalaska1,
Have had 17.5 Sailuns on my Suites for 2 travel seasons--this last season included a trip to Alaska. They are holding up very well at over 24k miles, and rarely need air. I do use a TPMS. I have more weight on my tires than you do.
I think you just made your own good luck.
Joe
Sounds good. I was concerned if the stiff ride was going to rattle my trailer to death. Hopefully not.
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Old 10-17-2016, 10:38 AM   #25
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I thought I would add to this topic.

Our HR 187qb single axle which has equaflex hangers on the leaf springs.

Came from factory with freestar china tires on it for three years never gave me a days issue.

Always inflated to 50 pounds of air never covered and looked great.

This year we had a big trip coming up so I thought I will change the tires to the maxxis m8008 tires and get them balanced, our trailer has factory aluminum wheels. So did this in the month of sept 2016.

We started the road trip first time with the new tires. On the Hwy cruise set at 60mph I could not help but notice how much nicer the trailer was pulling and even trucks passing us the trailer did not move much at all.

When we got to our first stop which was about 2hrs down the road I got out to check the wheel temps. And yes I still check by hand. To my surprise both were cold. So not sure in this case if wheel balancing may have been the help. But 1800 miles later we were back home safe and sound.

So even though the China tires never gave me a issue. I think in my next trailer I will switch right away to a set of maxxis tires.
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Old 10-18-2016, 10:46 AM   #26
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Some low end tires aren't designed to last much more than 5,000 to 10,000 miles. It's not a number I'm making up, but a number I saw during company training on tire sales. My jaw dropped on seeing it, but then again it matches personal experience.

When I got my used trailer, it had four brand new tires on it. I worn them out quickly, about 6000 miles until bald, even though they weren't loaded to their max capacity. I replaced them with a different brand tire that now have over 10,000 miles on them and plenty of tread still left.
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Old 10-18-2016, 11:27 AM   #27
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I think one of the major problems is that the trailers are so close to the weight limit of the tires that any additional factor can cause them to fail. You are technically within the weight limit of the design, but maybe by 20 lbs or less once you have the water in and your black and grey tanks are also partially or totally full. So you go a little over the speed rating, or you go a little under the 50 psi rating, and boom!

The manufacturers of the trailers are also doing everything they can to get costs down. So if one brand of tire is $1 cheaper than another, they switch to that one. When you build tens of thousands of trailers and each of them have at least 5 tires (including the spare), that's $5 per trailer saved, and many thousands saved over the year.

Quality control isn't likely as stringent as it should be either. The ST tire may be designed in the US with very specific parameters, and tested and certified to meet the standards with an initial run done in a low volume production line. Then they make more molds and send them to China to have millions of tires made. They no longer have the quality control to see if every batch of rubber has the same exact ratio of ingredients. They can't tell if every tire is made in the right way, with the correct number of layers of rubber, or if the rubber is wound in the correct way, if the sidewall is correctly connected to the tread, or if the steel belts are of the same quality, and are free of rust. Once the tire is formed, placed in the mold, and cooked, is every tire inspected? Do inspectors really reject every tire that should fail inspection, or are there borderline tires that in theory should fail, but are either turning a blind eye, or are told to turn a blind eye by the plant owners to prevent losses?

In my research, very very few, if any, ST tires are made in the US. Why are they made overseas (and mostly in China)? Because it's cheaper! Why is it cheaper? Because even when you factor in the shipping cost, the extremely low labor cost makes it worth it. I am also convinced (as I said above), that beyond the cheap labor, the quality of ingredients and construction are not there.

Most trailer tires aren't a big recognizable brand, besides Goodyear. There is no "brand reputation" to worry about. If my "Constancy" tires I have on my trailer start to develop a bad reputation in the industry, the manufacturer just changes the brand name, because it's easy to do when you don't actually have a brand to worry about. Nobody would be the wiser, because nobody knows who "Constancy" is anyway, and would have no idea that "West Lake", "Vail Sport", "Ridgway Sport", and "Castle Rock" are all the same manufacturer of ST tires as "Constancy", and likely are all made at the same factory, with the same ingredients, by the same workers, but just in a different mold. If a major brand like Michelin made trailer tires, then they would have more stringent controls on the quality, because their name relies on it.
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Old 10-18-2016, 10:15 PM   #28
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China bombs

I am not defending China tires. They are lacking but I never see anyone mentioning the hitch height as a contributing factor to tire failures. I see dual wheel TT's and 5er's speeding down the highway with the trailers not being towed level. Many are hitch high or low. This puts weight on the rear axle(hitch high) or front axle(hitch low). The tires on those axle's are under more stress from loads that are not balanced as they should be. I often see this and wonder why the tire gets blamed after being abused this way.
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