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Old 06-06-2013, 11:49 PM   #29
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Smokeywren, I ran into the same problem with that vendor. Got all excited that I found them only to get a message that they cancelled my order. I recently found the RB511 brackets at Heavy Duty Truck Parts Online, Brake Parts, Light & Medium Duty Truck Parts, Transit & School Bus, Coach, Trailer, Forklift & Semi Parts-Find it Parts Maybe they have access to the RB512 brackets.
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Old 06-07-2013, 09:11 AM   #30
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Quote:
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Maybe they have access to the RB512 brackets.
Nope. "Your search returned 0 results!"

But Stengel Brothers accepted the order yesterday and haven't cancelled yet, so here's hoping the next e-mail will say they shipped.
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Old 06-07-2013, 12:37 PM   #31
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E-mail from Stengle this morning:

"Sorry – this kit has been discontinued by Monroe. They don’t have any more in stock. We will cancel the order and void the charge to your credit card."
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Old 06-17-2013, 10:06 AM   #32
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My 99 Jayco has them under each axle. I was rather surprised to see them...
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Old 06-17-2013, 09:23 PM   #33
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Travel trailers travel down the highway like any other vehicle..... Why don't they have stock absorbers as standard equipment? Wouldn't it give the rig a more stable ride? Does anyone out there know the answer?
IMO for several reasons.
One I'm familiar with is the length of the spring (26") say on a 6k std leaf spring suspension axle has little compression and rebound compared to our trucks 70" long plus spring length with lots of compression/rebound. Also another reason trailer tires don't need or come balanced unless their is a balance problem. Those heavy short trailer springs limit lots of tire bounce/suspension travel vs the trucks suspension. Apples vs oranges.
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Old 06-18-2013, 08:03 AM   #34
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JIMNLIN,
I do understand, as you pointed out, the fact that a shorter leaf spring does limit the compression and rebound overall distance as a TT moves down the highway, but it still does move up and down. The same forces that are involved in a 70" spring are present in a 26" spring. If, years ago the automotive builders deemed it necessary to dampen these movements to improve ride, chassis movement and tire life then common sense and reason requires that it be dampened in a TT which may have a shorter spring as well. The adverse effect of un-dampened spring movement that does cause excessive TT sway, and tires loosing pressure with the ground as they bounce are present with any suspension system. Since all suspension systems: leaf, coil and torsion bounce and all other vehicles on our highways utilize shock absorbers to dampen and reduce the effect of that bouncing that bouncing needs to be dampened. It is my professional belief (35 years teaching automotive) that the TT industry decided years ago that since most utility trailers and boat trailers didn't use shocks that they could save a few bucks by not using them as well. That idea has persisted today except for some higher end units and a few others as well.

To be accurate suspension systems (leaf, coil & torsion bars) do not dampen anything. Suspension systems suspend the weight of a vehicle. Shock absorbers dampen a springs movement by converting the energy of a compressed spring into heat energy. There is a law of physics that states: "Energy can be neither created nor destroyed merely transformed from one form into another." When you use your brakes you are converting the energy of motion into heat energy. The energy in a compressed spring is converted into heat energy unless there is no shock absorber then it merely bounces until the energy is dissipated. Even if that bouncing is less with a shorter spring it still bounces and therefore adversely effect the ride quality and life of all suspension components.

The same is true for tire balance. Any tire that is slightly out of balance will increase tire wear, reduce suspension bushing life because of the constant hammering of the minute vibration. What we don't realize is that even small vibrations that we can't feel do negatively effect all of these things.

Just because we don't ride in our campers or can't feel the vibrations and frame bounce does not mean that it is not present and effecting the life of these components.
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Old 06-18-2013, 12:53 PM   #35
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Why do more expensive TT/5er's have shocks and the cheaper ones don't? It's not because cheaper ones don't need them or expensive ones need them. They all need them. It's strictly a cost item. And the cheaper they make them the cheaper they can sell them for. If spring travel was the issue then why put shocks on an F450? I doubt the rear springs travel up and down more than a TT/5'er. In fact unloaded I'd be willing to be that the F450's springs travel less than a loaded TT'5er.
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Old 06-18-2013, 04:22 PM   #36
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Thanks for the support on the shocks issue. Sometimes I feel like the only one blowing this horn.

This has got to be my shortest response.

TeJay
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Old 06-19-2013, 01:47 AM   #37
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The length of a trailer and the distance of the axles from the hitch should have some bearing on the amount of bounce in a trailer. For those with rear kitchens (like us), with the rear of the trailer feeling the greatest effect of bouncing, cupboard doors and drawers can easily fly open with contents ending up on the floor (like us). Sure you can tie handles together and stuff padding in the cabinets, but why would they not put shocks at least in their rear kitchen models knowing that bounce is an issue. Our last TT was about 20' long and had the kitchen over the axles. Bounce was never an issue. You could leave anything in the sink.

Another factor contributing to bounce I think, is the spring bar rating in a weight distributing hitch. We were having significant bounce in the rear of our trailer which got me thinking about shocks in the first place. I discovered recently that our 800 lb rated bars were too small for our 960 lb tongue weight. I have now installed 1200 lb bars and there is a lot less bounce in the rear of our trailer.

What effect do leaf spring equalizers have on bounce? Do they increase or decrease bounce?

Is there any benefit to installing an extra leaf in your springs (if you can)? Or could it cause more problems?

What does a higher amount of bounce do to the structure of a trailer? Will there be less vertical movement resulting in less wear and tear and damage to a trailer frame and structure above it if shocks are added? I assume the water tank supports would benefit a lot from shocks?

I think shocks are a good idea for a trailer. If a manufacturer installed them upfront, it wouldn't add much cost.
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Old 06-19-2013, 10:40 AM   #38
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myredracer,
Sorry to hear about your frame issues. There's lots of posts about bad frames and it's a sad commentary on the TT industry. I posted yesterday to somebody looking for a full time TT. I suggested that they buy a cheap digital caliper and measure the frame metal thickness. I've never done it but that would give you a good idea of the possible quality and stiffness of the frame.
Our last TT had the Dexter Tor-Flex independent axles. I think they are real good. You've got the independent action which has got to be better than straight axles. You don't have bushings or leaf spring shackles to grease or to replace. In our first TT after only one 2,000 mile trip I decided to rebuild the leaf springs and all the nylon bushing were bad. I added new bushings and wet-bolts so I could grease the bushings. The Tor-Flex axles also have brake self-adjusters.

I don't know what leaf spring equalizers are but I know this. Nothing that you do to a set of axles will replace what a shock absorber will do, which is to dampen/reduce the spring movement. That's the bottom line. TT's need shocks to improve all aspects of your TT: ride, tires, internal cabinets, axles, bushings, bearings, etc, etc. It's just common sense to me.

If you want some real good information on how to add shocks go to the Forest River forums and do a search for a poster with the name of, "OLD COOTt." He did a great job with his and is willing to share. He'll even send you some drawings and has posted a lot of pictures of what he did. If you have access to some shop equipment it's not difficult to build mounts and your cost would not exceed $150-$200. Your shocks will be the biggest expense.

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Old 06-20-2013, 08:19 AM   #39
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The Trail-Air Equaflex suspension is a good low cost add-on to help dampen road vibration and jolts. It will definitely add some stability your setup. Probably not as good as adding shock absorbers, but for some people shocks aren't an option due to frame design. The equaflex is the next best thing. Many people without shocks having stability problems will notice a night and day difference after adding equaflex. There are plenty of reviews of people that have installed them. Some people have them from the factory and don't even know it, and i see they are getting more popular coming standard on mid-level priced travel trailers.
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Old 06-21-2013, 11:46 AM   #40
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We are only 2 years into RVing......and learn every day how little we know.
I've already learned that our made in China tires are rated just a tiney bit over our max weight.........where do I look to see what the axles are rated at.
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Old 06-21-2013, 01:25 PM   #41
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Well, as it happens, you have answered your own question:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Freedom View Post
Wouldn't it give the rig a more stable ride?
Why yes it would, However in some places if you are RIDING in the trailer, you get an invitation to meet one of the area's more distinguished and honorable citizens.. The one you call "Your Honor" in fact.

Shock absorbers perform TWO functions on the automobile (Tow vehicle) they give a smoother ride (or firmer) and they improve handling (one or the other but alas, smooter ride is not best for handling).

The trailer however, has little choice but to "Trail" behind the tow vehicle so handling is not the issue. and you should NOT be riding in the trailer, that is considered dangerous, careless, or reckless depending on how badly the person in the trailer gets hurt.
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Old 06-22-2013, 10:29 AM   #42
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Controlling the ride comfort of the TT is not the intended purpose of installing shocks. Controlling the TT movement and therefore its effects on the tow vehicle are its intended purpose.
Think about it this way. Shocks help to control bounce and also sway or roll of your TV. If you encounter a bump on one wheel the shock dampens that bump and its effect on the bounce and sway of the TV. It would do the same on a TT. Ever drive an old pickup with straight axles? Hit a bump with the right wheel and it throws the truck to the left. Why not try to control those actions with the addition of shocks.

NOBODY IS ADVOCATING RIDING IN YOUR TT.

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