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Old 09-30-2013, 09:44 AM   #15
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Wish you were next to us in ky 10 days ago. You would have a whole new outlook. And yes I have pics. Personally never had a problem since 1972 ; always the first time.
On a whole I don't think fridge fires are common but they do happen and if you look at places / websites that sell salvage RVs, a large portion of them are from fridge fires.
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Old 09-30-2013, 09:45 AM   #16
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Just asking to see if I have this straight in my brain. I have 30 amp service in the class A. A 3,000 watt inverter would essentially provide 30amp 110v. Right?

I know it would suck down the batteries in short order, but I'm just trying to understand if it is the functional equivalent.

Also, are inverters "on demand"? In other words would running a 3000 watt inverter with no load drain the batteries faster than say a 400 watt inverter?
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Old 09-30-2013, 10:47 AM   #17
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Just asking to see if I have this straight in my brain. I have 30 amp service in the class A. A 3,000 watt inverter would essentially provide 30amp 110v. Right?

I know it would suck down the batteries in short order, but I'm just trying to understand if it is the functional equivalent.

Also, are inverters "on demand"? In other words would running a 3000 watt inverter with no load drain the batteries faster than say a 400 watt inverter?
The 30 amp rating of your RV has nothing to do with the output of the inverter. 30 is the amperage supplied to the coach from the campground If I figured it right the 3000W can supply about 25A max. Electrical guys/gals may correct me. It does surprise me to see a 30 amp coach with a inverter that large and residential fridge though. Usually they are in big rigs unless it is a small fridge.

A 400W inverter will not have enough power to run any decent size fridge. It all depends on the amp draw that should be stated in description or tech information. It's all about Ohm's law. Simply stated it will draw what it needs from a larger inverter. Our 2000 watt has no trouble with our fridge so the 3000 should be fine. If there is no load the inverter should be in stand by but the fridge will pull something whenever it is on. Keep in mind that unless the inverter is solely purposed for the fridge there will be other things connected that even though small may have lights or electronics on. Our microwave/convection oven is on ours but I don't think we could do more than heat a cup of coffee on the batteries.

Not to confuse the issue but some fridges will require a pure sine wave inverter, not a modified sine wave. If you really want to blow the salesman's mind ask him about that The fridge manufacturer should be able to tell you if you need one though.
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Old 09-30-2013, 10:56 AM   #18
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Samsung has stated in writing that at least some of its refrigerators will run on a modified sine wave inverter. Our RF197 ran fine with one until we replaced it with a pure sine wave unit. Samsung does state that an inverter used with the RF197 has to be able to supply ~11 A during certain operating situations (compressor startup, etc). This means that the safest approach would be to use an inverter rated at ~1,000 watts or more.
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Old 09-30-2013, 11:00 AM   #19
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On a whole I don't think fridge fires are common but they do happen and if you look at places / websites that sell salvage RVs, a large portion of them are from fridge fires.
Dont know what common would be but!!!!!! We are number 8565 according to norcold.
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Old 09-30-2013, 11:22 AM   #20
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This tells me exactly what I needed to know

"We replaced our Norcold with a residential but the inverter is big enough to run it. It won't go very long on the batteries".

That says it all as far as I'm concerned. If you're going to go places where there is no power you may want to pass this one up. I too have never witnessed a refer fire in the 40+ years we've been RVing. Seen plenty of other fires though. Don't give in to the chicken little voices. Not all Norcolds are part of a recall. Same for Dometic. And there is now a new player (Atwood) in the evaporative marketplace that uses Helium in the coil rather than Hydrogen.

We boondock several times a year. Music festivals in particular. Running a generator is frowned upon. Did I say frowned upon? I meant it will inspire the rabid scorn of nearly everyone who even hears rumors that there is a RV 'out there' with a running generator.

This despite that the sound systems & lights are all powered by generators. Apparently it's OK to sing & preach about saving the planet using power from diesel generators but anyone running one for 'personal' reasons is the devil incarnate. Not to mention the 'stars' who arrive in private helicopters. I just love the irony of it!
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Old 09-30-2013, 11:23 AM   #21
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Anotherone,

Unfortunately, there are RVer's that have both the lack of knowledge and the mentality that it CANNOT and WILL NOT happen to them.

Those are the ones that are in the category of what I call the "ostrich" effect.

No matter what has been said and shown as proof, they won't believe you.

It's like preaching to a brick wall.

I finally gave up after having been told that I am full of BS too many times.

Now if someone is genuinely interested in switching from their fire trap RV fridge to a residential fridge I will offer as much advice as they need but for anyone else they can go blow smoke.

Dr4Film ----- Richard
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Old 09-30-2013, 11:30 AM   #22
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So DH and I are looking to buy our 1st MH. We have a rough idea about the benefits of a residential fridge, such as bigger size and better insulation in hot climate. But a sales person told us that since a residential fridge doesn't run on propane, when the MH is on the road, we should try not to open the fridge, because the fridge is shut off. But if the rig has an inverter, wouldn't that solve the problem so that we can use the residential fridge as we would at home? Any pointers? Thx!
Truth is , the salesman may be right. Not all RV's have original equipment in them and have been modified (replaced frig) by previous owners. I believe I spotted an earlier post that made comment the he/she exchanged theirs without using an inverter. Once that MH leaves the factory you cannot be sure that what you are getting is the same as what the manual says. Adding an inverter that is large enough to keep the frig running may require more batteries as well. My coach came with a 2800W inverter because it has the Residential frig option. The ones that did not came with a 2000W and had fewer house batteries. Let the buyer beware! I think that is the saying! Unplug the coach, turn on the inverter, open the door and see if it lights up. At least you will know if it is plugged into a hot circuit.
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Old 09-30-2013, 03:37 PM   #23
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Anotherone,

Unfortunately, there are RVer's that have both the lack of knowledge and the mentality that it CANNOT and WILL NOT happen to them.

Those are the ones that are in the category of what I call the "ostrich" effect.

No matter what has been said and shown as proof, they won't believe you.

It's like preaching to a brick wall.

I finally gave up after having been told that I am full of BS too many times.

Now if someone is genuinely interested in switching from their fire trap RV fridge to a residential fridge I will offer as much advice as they need but for anyone else they can go blow smoke.

Dr4Film ----- Richard
Better stick to an all electric water heater, stove and bbq as they all can cause fires if not maintained or used properly and with caution.
Sorry been in the gas business for more than 35 yrs and it's amazing what I have seen and heard. Love the people that tell me they have smelled gas around their appliances or meter setups and have done nothing for years but wait till they see the gas company guy before reporting anything
All "accidents" waiting to happen
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Old 09-30-2013, 03:56 PM   #24
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Truth is , the salesman may be right. Not all RV's have original equipment in them and have been modified (replaced frig) by previous owners. I believe I spotted an earlier post that made comment the he/she exchanged theirs without using an inverter. Once that MH leaves the factory you cannot be sure that what you are getting is the same as what the manual says. Adding an inverter that is large enough to keep the frig running may require more batteries as well. My coach came with a 2800W inverter because it has the Residential frig option. The ones that did not came with a 2000W and had fewer house batteries. Let the buyer beware! I think that is the saying! Unplug the coach, turn on the inverter, open the door and see if it lights up. At least you will know if it is plugged into a hot circuit.

Yup .... I'm one of those. Reefer is on genset/shore power 120vac only. Inverter is 2000w MSW and is/was never wired to supply 120vac to the reefer cabinet. I don't care ... never needed it. Reefer stays cold 4 - 6 hours with no power. If traveling I make frequent stops to walk around and I start the genset which brings the reefer down about 3 degrees in 15 minutes. About the time it takes to walk, check the vehicles, get a drink/snack. Works for me ... not for everyone.

If I was a boondocker I might add a 1000W PSW inverter for the reefer.
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Old 09-30-2013, 06:50 PM   #25
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So DH and I are looking to buy our 1st MH. We have a rough idea about the benefits of a residential fridge, such as bigger size and better insulation in hot climate. But a sales person told us that since a residential fridge doesn't run on propane, when the MH is on the road, we should try not to open the fridge, because the fridge is shut off. But if the rig has an inverter, wouldn't that solve the problem so that we can use the residential fridge as we would at home? Any pointers? Thx!
If the coach has a residential fridge, it probably has an inverter/charger, and may even have an increased battery bank. You do have to make sure that the fridge is plugged into a receptacle with power provided by the inverter. On the road, the engine alternator will provide the power to the inverter/charger, so not only will the fridge have power, when you arrive at your destination your battery bank will be fully charged.

When our Norcold quit, we simply installed a residential fridge. Imagine our shock when we found out when overnight boondocking that in the morning our battery usage had not changed! I had assumed that when the Norcold was on propane that it didn't use any electricity. I also realize that the new fridge may be better insulated and sealed and probably a lot more efficient than our old Norcold.

We are gospel musicians, and boondocking is a lot of what we do. To assure our independence on the road, I have doubled our house battery bank. That was easy, simply added two more batteries. I have ordered a generator auto start to keep the batteries charged if we're away from the coach for a few days. Eventually I'd like to add some solar, which hopefully may eliminate the need to run the generator as much when we're parked in a crowded environment for several days, such as a music festival.

The bottom line for me is that our generator seems to run about the same amount of time to keep the batteries charged now compared to when we had the Norcold fridge. We find that the fridge plays a very minor role in our power usage. My wife and I use CPAP machines, which guarantees that the batteries will be down some in the morning. If it happens to be a cold night, the propane furnace makes sure that the batteries will need a good charging early in the morning. We need our coffee maker, toaster, and likely the microwave first thing in the morning, so the first thing that happens anyway when we wake up is we start the generator.
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Old 09-30-2013, 08:02 PM   #26
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Sorry

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Dont know what common would be but!!!!!! We are number 8565 according to norcold.
Post a link to the source of that information.
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Old 10-01-2013, 12:55 AM   #27
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in reply to HD4Mark, I'm looking at Georgetown 351DS (not the xl version), 2014 model by forest River. I'm trying to decide whether to get this one or the XL version, which doesn't have a residential fridge, but the XL version has a bigger chassis. Aghhhh!!!! So it comes down to whether to go for a bigger fridge (res.) or a bigger chassis. The res. fridge looks real nice.
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Old 10-01-2013, 01:05 AM   #28
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If you are looking at a new RV and the residential fridge is an option then you can bet there is an upgrade to make sure the fridge will work correctly. Most will have a inverter that will work with it and may even have more batteries. If it is a used RV and the fridge was replaced with a residential then I would make sure it works somehow when not plugged in.
We looked at a 2012 Dutch Star (should have bought it!!), had 10 or 12 house batteries and a bigger SW inverter, also a 10,000 watt gen set but that was due to the 3 heat pumps it also had.
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