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Old 07-17-2013, 04:24 PM   #1
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What does this A.R.I. standard mean?

Translate this please.

Running Watts A.R.I Standard Condition (80 F. DB 67 F. WB Indoor, 95 F. DB Outdoor)

Jeff
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Old 07-17-2013, 04:51 PM   #2
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Air Refrigeration Institute ratings
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Old 07-17-2013, 04:53 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trackman View Post
Air Refrigeration Institute
Ok thanks but what does 80 F. DB 67 F. WB Indoor, 95 F. DB Outdoor mean. I'm thinking maintaining 80 degrees F. indoors while its 95 degrees F. outdoors.
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Old 07-17-2013, 06:09 PM   #4
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DB stands for 'dry bulb.' Comparing the difference in temperature of two thermometers, one with a dry bulb, the other a wet bulb (Thermometer end covered in wet cloth) slung around in the air, you can determine the percent of relative humidity. Relative humidity is the amount of water moisture the air can hold at a given temperature. Weather terms.
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Old 07-17-2013, 06:16 PM   #5
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Ok bflinn thank you I believe we're making progress that was interesting. What do the numbers mean? They state dry blub and wet bulb indoor then only dry bulb outdoor.
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Old 07-17-2013, 06:53 PM   #6
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Relative Humidity is mainly important in weather predicting and human comfort. You being from Cheyenne, you probably don't know humidity. One of the factors of air conditioning is how much it 'dries out' the air. The lower the relative humidity, the more comfortable it feels on our skin. At high humidity we can't evaporate perspiration and feel hotter. (we sweat) The Air Refrigeration Institute is giving information (to those who can interpret it) on how efficient an A/C is at a specific temperature. Wet/Dry Bulb temps. are used to give relative humidity levels. The outside air's humidity doesn't matter to an A/C unit, it only effects how hot it feels to our skin, so they only report outside dry bulb temps.

I once had a $50 bet with a college roommate who insisted on putting a blanket on his car engine when the wind chill got low. I said it wouldn't help because engines aren't effected by wind chill since it is a combination of relative humidity and temperature, he insisted it did. I won, inanimate objects like car engines and air conditioners aren't affected by relative humidity, which is usually reported as 'heat index' in summer and 'wind chill' in winter.

Sorry I was so long winded, I'm a retired science teacher.
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Old 07-17-2013, 07:01 PM   #7
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Thank you sir and no problem with the length of the post, l like to understand vs memorize. I still don't understand the numbers. Are they saying it will cool a given amount of space, removing humidity along the way, to 80 degrees with an outside temp of 95?
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Old 07-17-2013, 07:39 PM   #8
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I don't see any notation for volume of space in the quote you posted, although that should be also a variable in sizing an A/C.
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Old 07-17-2013, 07:48 PM   #9
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So we're at a dead end
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Old 07-17-2013, 08:12 PM   #10
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When cooling air, the A/C unit has to cool in two different ways...sensible and latent.
The sensible cooing is simply cooling the air with no regard to the moisture in the air or humidity. The sensible cooling is measured with a dry bulb thermometer.



For the wet bulb or WB temperature you use a sling psychrometer or a hygrometer. You can convert a regular drybulb thermometer to a wet bulb thermometer by installing a cotton or gauze sock over the bulb and wet it with water. Now you sling the thermometer around for a period of time. The air passing over the wetbulb will evaporate the water and cool the air to near the dew point (another new term) and cool the bulb.

With the DB and WB temperatures, you use a psychometric chart to read the relative humidity or how many grains of moisture is in the air. From this chart, you can also plot the heating or cooling process. In the case of cooling you can also determine the coil (evaporator) dew point.

Google Image Result for http://www.truetex.com/psychrometric_chart.gif

What ARI does is to provide a standard set of conditions to establish a rating point. The unit that is ARI certified means the unit was tested at the standard inlet conditions for the air on the evaporator coil (the cold one) and the standard air on the condenser coil. Based on these standard conditions, the manufacturer rates the unit to provide XXX BTU/Hr cooling capacity. What this does for the consumer is that any manufacturer providing a 15,000 BTU/Hr rating is the same as any other manufacturer claiming the same capacity.

In order to use the ARI rating seal, the manufacture has to design and built a standard unit, or just a condenser or evaporator and then submit the equipment to the testing lab. The lab will confirm the actual test data and the rated capacity of the equipment. The manufacturer has to pay the lab time and materials to run the test.

I believe that they allow a variance on the test of +/- 5%.

Now you probably know more than you ever expected to know about for ARI certification.

Ken
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Old 07-17-2013, 08:21 PM   #11
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Ok, this is bad ass, I'm going to absorb for a bit. Very interesting. Thank you all for your patience.
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