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Old 12-27-2013, 07:01 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by New Hobby View Post
I have a friend that owns a very large chain of tire and repair centers. I called him and asked him where I could find a 4 corner scale to weigh my coach and he asked why. I told him so I could set a proper psi in my tires. He asked me about my tires, size, brand, ply and so on. He then told me that I have the best tire made for my coach and to run the max tire pressure and leave it. He said that tires run cooler at max pressure and my tire will handle it.
Im not saying he is right but I do trust him very much, so I will be running 115psi until something gives me a reason to change.

Thanks again for all this great info.
Did you ask him why the tire manufacturers spend the time, effort and money to publish tire pressure/load charts for each tire they produce?
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Old 12-27-2013, 08:20 AM   #16
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New Hobby,

Go for it dude, it's your RV. You have every right to choose what is best for you.

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Old 12-28-2013, 06:35 AM   #17
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I think I would listen to the tire manufactures and go with their instructions as they are the ones that built the tire and give you the guarantee.
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Old 12-28-2013, 09:14 AM   #18
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I use a Wheel Master guage,got it at Camping world.Seems to be spot on
all the time.
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Old 12-28-2013, 09:27 AM   #19
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Posted by Tireman9
Gauge Accuracy - I was wrong.


Previously in my post on gauge accuracy I suggested that you could get your pressure gauge checked by visiting a tire store from a tire manufacturer or very large dealer. Well after doing more investigations it turns out I was expecting more from dealers than they actually provide.

Tire dealers are primarily in the business of selling tires and vehicle service. They use gauges every day to inflate hundreds of tires but they do not have ISO calibrated gauges as this would be very expensive and the difference between the gauges they use every day and a calibrated gauge might be measurable but is not really meaningful.

Now this doesn't mean you should not make an effort to confirm your gauge is reasonable accurate the question is "How accurate is accurate enough"? If your gauge is +/- five percent of the inflation pressure you're measuring then you are probably okay, especially if you're running at least five percent above the minimum inflation needed to carry your load as measured in individual tire load scales.

Still, I would suggest you get a digital gauge for your personal "master gauge." They cost as less than $15. Then use that master gauge to check your everyday gauge. Keep your master packed away and not rattling around the bottom of your tool box under the hammer and wrenches where it will get dirty and damaged.

If you check a front tire with the digital master and then your every day gauge and note the difference then when you compare them again maybe a month later you should see the same difference. It is very unlikely for both gauges to go bad the same amount in the same direction at the same time.

If both gauges are within two to three percent when you first get the new digital master you are probably okay. If there is more than a three percent difference then I would check both against some other gauge to learn which is wrong.

Hope this clears things up and sorry if I mislead anyone.

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Labels: Cold Inflation, Gauge, Pressure
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Old 12-28-2013, 09:48 AM   #20
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Quote: "Still, I would suggest you get a digital gauge for your personal master gauge. They cost as less than $15."

Is there assurance this type of gauge is accurate?
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Old 12-28-2013, 09:50 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by New Hobby View Post
... He then told me that I have the best tire made for my coach and to run the max tire pressure and leave it. He said that tires run cooler at max pressure and my tire will handle it. Im not saying he is right but I do trust him very much, so I will be running 115psi until something gives me a reason to change.
Doing this may reduce the contact patch of rubber that meets the road, resulting in greater stopping distance. It
may also make the coach ride much rougher making you feel more bumps and vibration. Hitting the "sweet spot"
where the inflation pressure is "just right" usually improves handling and stopping ability.
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Old 12-28-2013, 10:14 AM   #22
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OK Boys and Girls. What you are really after is the correct pressure in the tire, irrespective of what the tire gage indicates.

It is very easy to do this. What is needed is to find that magic pressure whereby the entire surface of the tire is being wore evenly when driving in a straight line, and this also is very easy to ascertain, again irrespective of what the tire gage indicates.

First step is to use the chalk line on the tire trick. If you don't know this procedure, just look it up on Goggle, or the like, rather than a paragraph or two from me here. There are multiple sites explaining the procedure. Second step is to use your favorite gage to read the pressure once you have equal ware, and mark that gage to easily identify that gage for that vehicle and at that pressure. You see, its all relative at this point.

Personally, I run a little higher pressure than that which I found to be the magic pressure of equal ware as I like a little higher pressure for various reasons, and seeing as how the RV tires will be replaced due to time, rather than ware on the tire, a higher pressure is not financially prohibitive.

Just be sure to use that gage with that vehicle and it doesn't really matter if it's in sink with a proven "right on" gage because that gage is tuned for that particular vehicle, and maybe no other.

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Old 12-28-2013, 10:19 AM   #23
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Woops, make ware read wear!

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Old 12-28-2013, 10:41 AM   #24
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When I was crewing a race car, I assembled my own liquid filled gauge and was the only one that checked tires.
May I suggest going to a site like Omega.com and checking on gauge quality and just make your own.
The digitals are nice but I think the analogs work just fine.
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Old 12-28-2013, 11:39 AM   #25
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I guess most people like digital but I still love my Milton old fashioned type. It is very accurate and easy to read:
Milton S986 Service Gauge - Straight Foot Dual Head Chuck : Amazon.com : Automotive
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Old 12-28-2013, 01:20 PM   #26
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Had that Accutire and it seemed to work ok until the hose exploded. Now I have three gauges; a Slime digital, a cheap Accutire that reads 2 psi higher, and the Pressure Pro sensors that read 3 psi lower except that two of them are only 2 psi lower. So I just call the Slime gauge accurate and go with it.
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Old 12-28-2013, 06:21 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Airstreamer6 View Post
Quote: "Still, I would suggest you get a digital gauge for your personal master gauge. They cost as less than $15."

Is there assurance this type of gauge is accurate?

Yes. I have checked my two master gauges against laboratory certified to automotive industry standards QS9000 ISO/IEC 17025 that was checked at 80.0 psi.
My $9 Accutire MS-4021B gave 80.5 and 79.5 psi readings. After 4 years they still read 1psi different from each other.
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Old 12-28-2013, 06:38 PM   #28
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Yes, unless you get a defective one any digital gauge is likely to be +/- 1.5 psi max. and that is plenty good enough. A decent analog gauge will cost a lot more and struggle to be as good so a digital is the way to go, why fight it...
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