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Old 05-05-2016, 12:55 PM   #15
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No one makes an aluminum frame with aluminum siding ?
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Old 05-06-2016, 11:15 AM   #16
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No one makes an aluminum frame with aluminum siding ?

I don't think so. The alum siding is usually stapled to the wood frame along the bottom of each panel. Seems it would be hard to do that with an alum frame.
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Old 05-06-2016, 12:22 PM   #17
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I don't think so. The alum siding is usually stapled to the wood frame along the bottom of each panel. Seems it would be hard to do that with an alum frame.
I guess you could rivet the alum siding to an alum frame.
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Old 05-06-2016, 01:52 PM   #18
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I don't think it would be too effective. If you ever get to see a piece of the siding, there's only a small flat to anchor on the bottom. The rivet would be so small and the movement going down the road wold hollar it out so quick. That's my opinion.
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Old 05-06-2016, 06:42 PM   #19
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No one makes an aluminum frame with aluminum siding ?
Holiday rambler did back in the mid 70's to early eighties. My grandparents had a 78 imperial limited fifhtwheel which was high end in those days. They were better than the majority of what is built today.

HOWEVER aluminum frames with aluminum siding are subject to ELECTROLOSIS. The two metals have a chemical reaction when water gets between the two and some sort of corrosion happens.
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Old 05-06-2016, 06:54 PM   #20
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After owning both, actually currently owning both, I will never purchase a fiberglass sided rv again. Several years ago, the back of our metal sided 5'er got smashed. It looked bad and i could see an insurance adjuster totaling it. I got it home, and carefully figured out how to remove the siding. I was able to completely remove the entire back, straiten the metal pretty good, rebuild all the wood wall and put it all back together. The wife got home and she said she could hardly tell. The metal wasn't perfect but its fine. On ours, the bottom piece is screwed in place. Then the bottom of the next piece is stapled and the top is snapped to the bottom of the next piece. And so on. It's really very easy to remove and put back. I've even wondered if it were to be possible to order a replacement piece of metal siding. On our fiberglass sided TT, when it was new had a leak and the water got behind the siding and made a bubble. Just about impossible to fix. it hasn't grown but recently in a new area another one came up. As soon as the rain stops for some time here, I'm going to tackle this. I may have to open it up from the inside to fix it but I have seen a glue system that IF the bubble is close enough to the edge or a window or hatch that can be removed, you can insert a small tube and inject new glue and then you fabricate a large panel to apply pressure to hold it flat overnight.

If it came down to it, I can see someone taking their time and completely taking all the metal off and rebuilding the entire metal sided rv. I can't see that with a fiberglass sided rig, although I have seen one guy on youtube replace the entire side of his fiberglass sided TT at home.

Bubbles on the side of a fiberglass rig take all of the resale value right out of it and most buyers will walk away if they see a bubble.
I come from a working class fix all, do all background but I surely don't buy a camper based on which is easier to rebuild walls and replace studs in the walls. Keeping it dry is what makes them last and if the insurance co totals it because of an accident then we would be rv shopping. I think it's great what you were able to do to yours but I wouldn't buy based on that.
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Old 05-06-2016, 08:53 PM   #21
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Wow, a lot of good info here and it has given me a lot to think about. I really like the idea of alum. frame and alum siding. I wonder why they could not use color matching/decorative, self-tapping sheet metal screws, to attach the alum siding to a metal frame? Kind of like building a metal building.
I am going to be doing a LOT of looking at various makes and models, and how they are assembled, before buying, that is for sure.
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Old 05-06-2016, 09:01 PM   #22
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Generally the cheaper / lower price point RV trailers have the aluminum siding.
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Old 05-07-2016, 07:47 AM   #23
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My vote:
Love the Airstreams, but could easily live with a "stick built" alum. over wood frame trailer.

For long term, I would avoid any of the so called "bonded" or "sandwich" construction types. They're kinda like a cardboard box. If they get wet internally, they just kinda melt, and from an economic standpoint, are nearly impossible to fix after the fact.

2500HD - As a former RV tech (19 years) and currently active do it your selfer, easy "repairability" is pretty high on my list. Different strokes, you know? When talking long term ownership as the OP suggests in his post, MANY might view simpler/easier "repairability" as a way to control costs, even if they aren't doing the work themselves.
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Old 05-07-2016, 08:16 AM   #24
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Holiday rambler did back in the mid 70's to early eighties. My grandparents had a 78 imperial limited fifhtwheel which was high end in those days. They were better than the majority of what is built today.

HOWEVER aluminum frames with aluminum siding are subject to ELECTROLOSIS. The two metals have a chemical reaction when water gets between the two and some sort of corrosion happens.
Electrolsis (sic) happens with two different metals are mated together. Aluminum and aluminum are still aluminum. Airplanes are aluminum riveted to aluminum and the last for 80 years or more.
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Old 05-07-2016, 08:29 AM   #25
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' if the insurance co totals it because of an accident"

We never had the insurance company or anyone look at it. What happend was we ere towing our boat behind it, and in one of those go here, no go here, no go here discussions with the wife as your telling her we cant just go down any road or turn with this boat back there for the 17,000th time, you just go down one and to get out the turn was so sharp it pushed the steps on the front of the pontoon boat trailer into the back of the camper. I say it looked totaled as an expression of how bad it looked. But it wasn't really that bad. I also used that opportunity to re arrange how some of the bathroom was laid out to give us a little more room and to remove a cabinet that we really didn't use in there. Plus, I'm a guy that prefers to do things myself so I know how they are done. We have 2 rv dealers near us and they are not known for service and I would imagine they wouldn't have even tried to fix this.

I'm about to take all the metal skin off of our slide. I can see a outward belly in the wall and when doing the lift on it, I removed the fender skirts and can see that the slide has been skinned with a very thin plywood under the metal. I imagine that that plywood has become un attached to the studs in the wall of the slide, so it needs attention.

And to top all that off, this thing is paid for. I can do an awful lot of work on it before I come anywhere near the cost of a new trailer.
All this is also my supporting reasons to never buy a fiberglass sided rv again, unless we magically win the lottery and I have 500k I just needed to spend suddenly on a 50foot motorhome.
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Old 05-07-2016, 08:39 AM   #26
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Electrolsis (sic) happens with two different metals are mated together. Aluminum and aluminum are still aluminum. Airplanes are aluminum riveted to aluminum and the last for 80 years or more.
Can also happen, and frequently does, when the alum. is bonded to luan backing with a "water proofing" agent that was never intended to be used in close proximity to alum.

There was an entire generation of coaches built that had this issue, due mostly to the coach manf's (including Fleetwod, HR, and even some high end coaches, like Vogue) having been sold a false bill of goods by the luan manf's..... resulting in a bunch of customers left holding the results.
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Old 05-07-2016, 04:25 PM   #27
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Can also happen, and frequently does, when the alum. is bonded to luan backing with a "water proofing" agent that was never intended to be used in close proximity to alum.

There was an entire generation of coaches built that had this issue, due mostly to the coach manf's (including Fleetwod, HR, and even some high end coaches, like Vogue) having been sold a false bill of goods by the luan manf's..... resulting in a bunch of customers left holding the results.
exactly we had one and I saw it. Not sure of the exact science behind it but I have see it happen. Has nothing to do with airplanes like the other poster was saying.
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Old 05-08-2016, 07:41 AM   #28
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Can also happen, and frequently does, when the alum. is bonded to luan backing with a "water proofing" agent that was never intended to be used in close proximity to alum.

There was an entire generation of coaches built that had this issue, due mostly to the coach manf's (including Fleetwod, HR, and even some high end coaches, like Vogue) having been sold a false bill of goods by the luan manf's..... resulting in a bunch of customers left holding the results.
Sports coach and Open Road were both involved with this. Many Sports coaches had to be resided. According to Sportscoach and Open Road, it was the glue that attacked the aluminum. When they glued the luan to the aluminum the glue, over time, corroded the aluminum.
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