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Old 07-01-2012, 10:11 AM   #43
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So.... what would have happened if he hadn't noticed and just started down the road? Obviously it would have been very bad but would it be fire and brimstone bad... like in the engine catching fire or worse?

Rick
Years ago I was working for a farmer. When the fuel man delivered fuel, he filled a half full diesel barrel with gas. Later I filled the diesel tractor with it and headed for the field. After about a 100yds. it started smoking and lost power. I turned around and made it back in 1st. gear (and that was on level ground). Based on that I would guess that the most that would happen is it wouldn't run. I have run into the green gas nozzles but saw it before pumping (I was lucky). I think it was BP.
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Old 07-01-2012, 10:29 AM   #44
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I also have added about 10% gasoline to diesel ratio in the coldest of winter month to my diesel tank during fillup. this came after a fuel gelling incident and the recommendations of a diesel mechanic for a fleet company. 30 years of many 200k mile diesel vehicles, many different motors brands and the evolution of the diesel motor injection system and not a issue yet. also have never had injector or fuel pump issue in all these years and miles so i doubt if the ratio effects these items. that was my last fuel gel issue too. not sure in higher temps if detonation would be a factor and at what ratio of fuel does it get harmful to the motor. I do know of 2 of the early gm diesels that where gas to diesel engine blocks that gm installed in the olds/buick cars that where ruined by 100% gasoline injestion during a incorrect gasoline fillup.
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Old 07-01-2012, 10:37 AM   #45
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I Googled the question and at several sites, including a Dodge diesel web site, where there were two pages of speculation. No actual experience as to what did happen.
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Old 07-01-2012, 03:23 PM   #46
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I have no experience with "modern electronic controlled diesel engines, however, on older diesels with mechanical pumps and injectors, the harm from using high dosages of gasoline is caused by the lack of lubricity in the gasoline. Really close tolerances in both injection pumps, and mechanical injectors required the lubrication qualities offered by the diesel fuel that passed thru them for these components to have a long life. Gasoline as a lubricant is pretty dry. On the older pre-electronic Mercedes Benz diesels, gasoline was often used as an anti gelling agent for severe winter climate operation.A 10% or less concentratin of gasoline worked well for this purpose and caused no harm to the injection system. Mercedes owners manuals up until around 1970, stated it was OK to use 1 gallon of gasoline diluted with one quart of engine oil as an emergency fuel supply in their diesel engines.
I have had quite a bit of experience with owners mistakenly filling their diesels with gasoline. The result was a distinct lack of power, a much quieter running engine, (no diesel knock), usually very, very hard to start, or would not start or run at all. All that was required to fix the situation was to drain the tank change the fuel filters, and add fuel to the tank. As far as causing damage to the engine, I never ever ran in to a mis-fuel situation that caused any harm, other than inconvenience to the driver, and maybe a little embarrassment .
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Old 07-01-2012, 04:07 PM   #47
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I have no experience with "modern electronic controlled diesel engines, however, on older diesels with mechanical pumps and injectors, the harm from using high dosages of gasoline is caused by the lack of lubricity in the gasoline. Really close tolerances in both injection pumps, and mechanical injectors required the lubrication qualities offered by the diesel fuel that passed thru them for these components to have a long life. Gasoline as a lubricant is pretty dry. On the older pre-electronic Mercedes Benz diesels, gasoline was often used as an anti gelling agent for severe winter climate operation.A 10% or less concentratin of gasoline worked well for this purpose and caused no harm to the injection system. Mercedes owners manuals up until around 1970, stated it was OK to use 1 gallon of gasoline diluted with one quart of engine oil as an emergency fuel supply in their diesel engines.
I have had quite a bit of experience with owners mistakenly filling their diesels with gasoline. The result was a distinct lack of power, a much quieter running engine, (no diesel knock), usually very, very hard to start, or would not start or run at all. All that was required to fix the situation was to drain the tank change the fuel filters, and add fuel to the tank. As far as causing damage to the engine, I never ever ran in to a mis-fuel situation that caused any harm, other than inconvenience to the driver, and maybe a little embarrassment .
Well that's reassuring! I'd sure as heck hate to ruin my engine because I made the mistake of adding the wrong fuel to my engine!! This thread really was an eye opener for me because I can see me making that mistake by not paying attention to the proper fuel nozzle or worse yet, the attendant adds the wrong fuel and I drive away blissfully unaware until something goes wrong!
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Old 07-01-2012, 06:07 PM   #48
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That was my intent, to let others be aware and pay attention when fueling or having someone else fuel your coach.
Lots of good responce to my "not paying attention" but most importantly was that I DID NOT turn the key to start the fuel pump or start the engine. That in itself saved purging the fuel pump, the fuel lines and replacing fuel filters or any engine problems. My discussion with Cummins was " A few gallons would not be a problem" any more "could" have resulted in damage to several components . Hopefully this thread at least provided an awareness to others.
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Old 07-02-2012, 06:46 AM   #49
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No, no, no ...

The "official" colors he's talking about are for the markings on tank caps, so the delivery drivers don't put the wrong fuel in the wrong tank. The pump nozzle colors are NOT subject to the same rules, and should never be expected to be uniform. Bottom line, read the words on the pump, don't assume anything from the color.

And you will not find anything but ultra-low-sulfur diesel fuel at a gas station or truck stop pump islands. Anything else, like kerosene or off-highway fuel, will be isolated and clearly labeled.
Thanks for clearing that up for me Crabby Mike!
Because all of this is new to me, I do take my time to make certain that I pump the right fuel into the tank. This thread helped reinforce that. I have noticed while pumping my fuel that it does say "Low Sulfur" right there on the pump.
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Old 07-02-2012, 07:14 AM   #50
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I never knew gas pumps were color coded. I thought the pumps were their color to match the company logo/color.
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Old 07-02-2012, 10:47 AM   #51
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Isn't the actual nozzle on the diesel pump a little bigger than the regular gas pump? We are headin to Oregon and I will keep a close eye on the fella pumping diesel into my truck.
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Old 07-02-2012, 05:02 PM   #52
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It is bigger "Usually" at Truck stops but not at gas stations I have found. They do that of course because most Semi's have 150 gal tanks and it reduces the time they are at the pumps. But gas stations mostly are the normal size nozzels.
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Old 07-06-2012, 02:30 PM   #53
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Why 90% of the time I go around to the truck pumps....
those can fill up a large tank in a few minutes...
my little tank is just a squirt to those pumps
and then I'm off !

I actually asked some truckers if they minded my rv on 'their' side...
most said no because they knew I would be quick
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Old 07-06-2012, 02:35 PM   #54
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I filled up my rig this morning( because I waited for it to go up 10 cents/gal last night) that you guys got me looking. I put Diesel in my Harley because I got to talking with everybody, I wasn't paying attention. Lucky it was just a squirt.
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Old 07-06-2012, 07:12 PM   #55
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fuel

I notice the difference in pumps. The diesel is usually a separate pump and smelly and dirty.
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Old 07-06-2012, 07:53 PM   #56
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And you will not find anything but ultra-low-sulfur diesel fuel at a gas station or truck stop pump islands. Anything else, like kerosene or off-highway fuel, will be isolated and clearly labeled.
Not totally true either. I know of at least one Shell station close to home that has the high sulfur off road diesel in pumps right next to the low sulfur lane.
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